Track 2: Well-being and health. Al-Fereej: caring for living conditions Virtual Room 1
Oct 29, 2021 02:00 PM - 04:00 PM(Asia/Qatar)
20211029T1400 20211029T1600 Asia/Qatar Virtual Only | Track 2 | Session 2. Urban planning for public health

Some close links between town planning and public health always existed, to varying degrees, depending on time and place, but rather around measures, still useful today, intended to limit the spread of infectious diseases. More recently, in European and North American countries, facing the epidemic of chronic diseases linked to changes in lifestyles and the aging of the population, the area of intersection between urban development and public health has widened. The following presentations will present how cities can be more favorable to health, in its physical, mental and social aspects. 

Virtual Room 1 57th ISOCARP World Planning Congress in Doha, Qatar congress@isocarp.org

Some close links between town planning and public health always existed, to varying degrees, depending on time and place, but rather around measures, still useful today, intended to limit the spread of infectious diseases. More recently, in European and North American countries, facing the epidemic of chronic diseases linked to changes in lifestyles and the aging of the population, the area of intersection between urban development and public health has widened. The following presentations will present how cities can be more favorable to health, in its physical, mental and social aspects. 

From the City of Patholopolis to City of Hygeia: Unlocking Planning and Health challenges in Cities in NigeriaView Abstract
Case Study Report 01:00 PM - 02:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/10/29 10:00:00 UTC - 2021/10/29 11:30:00 UTC
Global cities have become cities of patholopolis, containers of disease, including COVID-19. Cities were temporarily incapacitated during COVID-19 lockdown and stay-at-home measures. The city retreated into its shell like a snail and remained quiet to the dictates of the invisible COVID-19 disease. From board rooms to streets, the city paused breathing, gasping for air literally. As of May 24, 2020, there are 166,019 cases and 2067 deaths in Nigeria (NCDC, 2021). The number of cases and deaths defies logic when compared to the rest of the world even with the non-compliance with lockdown measures. Urban areas have become the epicentre of the pandemic with an estimated 90 percent of all reported COVID-19 cases (UN-Habitat, 2020). In Nigeria, the transmissibility of COVID-19 was exacerbated by non-compliance with social distancing, inadequate infrastructure to support pandemic-related preparedness in living conditions, and crowded slum dwellings. There has been blatant disregard or non-compliance especially in public places and spaces. Widespread disbelief of the existential threat of COVID-19 and the lack of trust in the Nigerian Government is also noticeable. This paper discusses the impacts of city form, crowding and community (living conditions) on the health of residents and vulnerability to COVID-19 in Nigeria. Lack of appropriate infrastructures and poor accessibility in slums and high-density neighbourhoods makes residents in these areas susceptible to communicable diseases. Paper adopts the healthy cities concept and discusses the principles related to health needs and actions in post-pandemic preparedness. Paper explores sustainable and resilient planning and health approaches for a safe post-pandemic future. A theoretical paper with practical illustrations from cities in Nigeria. Data from secondary sources, literature review, textbooks, journal articles will be utilised and anecdotal examples will be drawn from cities in Nigeria. Patrick Geddes characterized the “stages of urban existence in Rome in the First century B.C as parasitopolis and patholopolis: the city of parasites and the city of diseases” (Mumford, 1961/1989:230). The city of Hygeia, though utopia, can be applied in building back better and post-pandemic preparedness. To avert the human and environmental catastrophes of a future pandemic, cities have to move from patholopolis, city of diseases, to Hygeia, the city of health. A healthy city is one that is continually creating and improving those physical and social environments and expanding those community resources which enable people to mutually support each other in performing all the functions of life and in developing to their maximum potential (Hancock and Duhl, 1988). COVID-19 lockdowns exposed the inequities and inequalities in the city form, crowding and communal living. Restrictions and proximity resulted in increased gender-based violence, spread of other communicable diseases, and interstate border restriction preventing the flow of food and other resources. Formlessness and uncontained city sprawl compounds accessibility and makes social and physical distancing unrealistic. COVID-19 transmissibility is increased in high density neighbourhoods with rooming types and traditional compound housing types with no space to isolate. Shared sanitary facilities and lack of hand washing basins precludes the spread of disease in these housing typologies. The culture of congregating in open markets, religious places, schools, streets, and motor parks/garages, all constitute magnets for crowding and disease spread. Post-pandemic preparedness is fundamental in achieving the city of Hygeia. Unlocking the planning and health challenges in Nigerian cities or other cities globally entails building and maintaining resilient infrastructure-soft and hard- in sustainable ways leaving no one behind. Our living environments must be healthy, resilient, inclusive, and strengthened for community placemaking that enhances biophilia and embraces community engagement.
Presenters
OO
Olusola Olufemi
Associate, Society For Good Health, Sustainable Development And Environmental Awareness, Nigeria
Co-authors
OO
Omotola Olufemi
Private
PO
Pinremola Olufemi
Government
Towards Healthier Cities: Urban Green Spaces (UGS) in the Neighbourhood Benfica, LisbonView Abstract
Research Paper 01:00 PM - 02:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/10/29 10:00:00 UTC - 2021/10/29 11:30:00 UTC
The World Health Organisation and the European Healthy Cities Network recommend that urban planning and designing focus on the communities and increase their well-being. In recent years, urban planning and design have provided urban rehabilitation in once peripheral or cross-border areas. It has offered the opportunity to redesign the public realm towards sustainable and healthier Cities. Benfica is a Lisbon district that evolved from an overlap of a rural town and a suburbanization process led by a railway line. It has its own character, great urban livelihood, and a high centrality potential. A whole span of green spaces can be found in the Benfica district found: formerly rural areas like Granja Estate, urban pocket spaces, the Monsanto Forest Park, and the rehabilitation of heritage that allowed the gardens of the Baldaya Palace to be open to the public. The study explores the role and impact of green spaces towards healthier cities through a mixed methodology, applied to the Lisbon Green Capital 2020 and Benfica, which is seen as a representative neighbourhood (1) Review of literature, policies, urban planning, (2) observation methods, mapping, and spatial analyses of green space types and their correlation with different indicators; and, possibly (3) interviews. References Madanipour, Ali. 2018. 'Temporary Use of Space: Urban Processes between Flexibility, Opportunity and Precarity'. Urban Studies 55 (5): 1093–11 Batty, M. (2021) ‘Science and design in the age of COVID-19’, Environment and Planning B: Urban Analytics and City Science, 48(1), pp. 3–8. doi: 10.1177/2399808321989131. Louro, A., Marques da Costa, N. and Marques da Costa, E. (2021) ‘From Livable Communities to Livable Metropolis: Challenges for Urban Mobility in Lisbon Metropolitan Area (Portugal)’, International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 18(7), p. 3525. doi: 10.3390/ijerph18073525. Pineo, H. (2020) ‘Towards healthy urbanism: inclusive, equitable and sustainable (THRIVES) – an urban design and planning framework from theory to praxis’, Cities & Health, 0(0), pp. 1–19. doi: 10.1080/23748834.2020.1769527. Vikas Mehta, Danilo Palazzo, ed. 2020. Companion to Public Space. 1st ed. Routledge Taylor & Francis Group.
Presenters
SM
Sofia MORGADO
Professora Aux. Agreg., Faculdade De Arquitetura, Universidade De Lisboa
Co-authors
JD
Jeanna De Campos Cunha
Post-Graduate, IGOT, Universidade De Lisboa
EM
Eduarda Marques Da Costa
Associate Professor, CEG - IGOT, Universidade De Lisboa
Towards Preventative Urban Health Resilience: A Case Study of Cairo's HeliopolisView Abstract
Research Paper 01:00 PM - 02:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/10/29 10:00:00 UTC - 2021/10/29 11:30:00 UTC
The increasing prevalence of diseases in urban populations caused by poor living conditions and social inequities is a major concern for cities and their dwellers alike. This concern has become even more relevant after the COVID-19 pandemic, which highlighted a significant vulnerability to health disasters. This research aims to examine and fill the gap between urban health and urban resilience through the analysis of urban health determinants, particularly focusing on mobility and greenery, and investigates the inclusion of preventative urban health measures in the Cities Resilience Index (CRI) framework. These aims were achieved through a literature review and empirical research, the latter through a case study of physical and social determinants of health and semi-structured interviews with residents of Heliopolis in Cairo. Heliopolis is undergoing an urban mobility project intending to turn it into a large mobility axis. The findings underlined a major reduction in walkable spaces, percentages of greenery, and sense of safety; affecting the residents' lifestyles and space-use patterns and potentially leading to increased health risks, pollution and disaster vulnerability. This thesis closes by providing recommendations relinking urban health and resilience, adopting a more preventative approach to health promotion, especially in global south cities.
Presenters Mohamed Abdelmoneim
Consultant | Urban Researcher | Architect, Universitat Internacional De Catalunya / Technische Universität Darmstadt
Enlightenment on Modern Urban Planning of the Traditional Construction Wisdom in Lingnan RegionView Abstract
Research Paper 01:00 PM - 02:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/10/29 10:00:00 UTC - 2021/10/29 11:30:00 UTC
This paper explores how the traditional construction wisdom of Lingnan region deals with urban planning to gain better human comfort. The traditional construction wisdom of Lingnan region adopts unique design techniques such as layout, ventilation and heat insulation, which not only adapts to the hot and humid summer climate in southern China, but also realizes the effect of “natural air conditioning” in urban planning. The traditional construction wisdom has a history of thousands of years and are the quintessence of the wisdom of Chinese traditional culture. This author makes a field measurement of the thermal environment in Donghuali community, Foshan city (in Guangdong province, PRC), extracting such the thermophysical parameters as air velocity, wind direction, temperature, relative humidity, and conducting an analysis of human comfort, to discuss through the data how the traditional construction wisdom of Lingnan works. The paper focuses on whether the traditional wisdom can be tested in a scientific way, and what kind of design inspiration it brings to contemporary urban planning. The breakout of COVID-19 is not only a test for all mankind, but also a reflection on urban planning. In the post-coronavirus era, urban planning should not only stay in the temporary state of simply preventing the recurrence of the epidemic. The potential risks that blocks, communities and cities may face should be analyzed more systematically to comprehensively improve the sustainable development of the building. The conclusion of this paper is that the traditional construction wisdom of Lingnan region can effectively solve the problem of hot and humid climate in summer in southern China without active energy sources assistance, better meet the requirements of human comfort, and play a positive role in the sustainable development of urban planning in the post-epidemic era.
Presenters
FL
FENGYAN LI
GuangZhou,China, South China University Of Technology
Co-authors
QL
QI LU
South China University Of Technology
Evaluation on well-being and urban development: a case study on 33 cities of mainland ChinaView Abstract
Research Paper 01:00 PM - 02:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/10/29 10:00:00 UTC - 2021/10/29 11:30:00 UTC
Over the past 40 years, the social economy of China has achieved leapfrog development and the urbanization level has been continuously improved. According to the seventh national census, the urbanization rate has reached 63.89%, which means China has entered the urban era. With the achievement of prosperity in all respects, what we now face is the contradiction between unbalanced and inadequate development and the people's ever-growing needs for a better life. The focus of the governance changes from increase GDP and accelerate urban construction to improve people’s well-being. There is no doubt that improving the urban development environment based on meeting the various needs of residents is closely related to people’s well-being. We summarized the cognition of well-being in Chinese traditional culture and the concerns of contemporary Chinese to ensure that the follow-up research is applicable to the local situation in China. On the one hand, based on the Happiness Sphere Theory, time geography and Maslow Demand Theory, the study built a happiness evaluation system with 3 spheres which included 50 index items. On the other hand, the study analyzed the mapping relationships between the subjective and objective factors and the difference between east China and west China through the nationwide questionnaire survey. What's more, the study applied the data of 33 cities in China to the evaluation system to make a preliminary analysis and demonstrated the future application possibilities. The conclusion concentrated on a summary of well-being features and a discussion of both advantages and disadvantages of the urban development environment. In addition, we conducted a specific analysis of key cities like Beijing and Hangzhou and so on. Among them, we could find out that although the high house price and long-distance commutes to work daily decreased the well-being of residents in Beijing, the high quality of medical care and education, the prosperous culture, the diverse types of employment in Beijing also made many people satisfied. Differently, Hangzhou let residents feel well because it performed well in all aspects and improved the convenience of city life through intelligent governance. What needs to be illustrated is that the high accessibility and operability of the statistical data and big data provides a clear perspective for researchers and practitioners in other countries undergoing society transition.
Presenters
QX
Qing XIA
Research Assistant, Institute For China Sustainable Urbanization, Tsinghua University
Co-authors
XL
Xiaohe LYU
Institute For China Sustainable Urbanization, Tsinghua University
Shaping Air Negative Ion Life Circles in the Coastal Space for Healthy CitiesView Abstract
Research Paper 01:00 PM - 02:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/10/29 10:00:00 UTC - 2021/10/29 11:30:00 UTC
Air quality is an important factor affecting human health. Air negative ions are one of the elements of the air, with functions such as health care and air purification. As one of the important indicators of urban air quality, its impact on public health is profound. Firstly, the coastal area of Dalian, China is selected as the research object. Based on the division of land functional units, combined with spatial layout, building density, green space and other factors, the measured sampling points of each unit are determined, and the air ion concentration is actually monitored. The monitored data is used to analyze the temporal and spatial distribution characteristics of air negative ions, and use ArcGis interpolation to analyze their distribution laws. At the same time, according to the corresponding evaluation standards, the level of air quality in the area is obtained. Secondly, the correlation analysis between air negative ions and microclimates such as temperature, humidity, wind speed, etc., based on the correlation significance, draws a conclusion that wind speed has a greater impact on air negative ions. Based on the correlation significance, it is determined that wind speed has a greater impact on air negative ions. Use phonics (one of the Computational Fluid Dynamics analysis software) to simulate wind environment, and compare the simulation results with the distribution of air negative ions, spatial layout, and clusters of people. The superposition and comparative analysis can then intuitively find the built-up space elements that affect the distribution of negative air ions, which provides a direction for the optimization of the coastal area. Finally, combined with public health needs, summarized the coastal area space optimization strategy, using water system and green space as the organizational function, constructing high negative ion living units, and combining the prevailing wind direction, opening the "wind-negative ion" channel, etc., to create a rich and fresh air , Healthy and comfortable space environment.
Presenters
HX
HAOTIAN XU
Dalian University Of Technology
Co-authors
CW
CHENLING WU
Tianjin University,School Of ARCHitecture
Research on the Construction of “15-Minute ” Cities under the Health Impact AssessmentView Abstract
Research Paper 01:00 PM - 02:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/10/29 10:00:00 UTC - 2021/10/29 11:30:00 UTC
Abstract :China's urban development has entered a new stage of development. With the emergence of urban development needs and problems in the post-epidemic period, health impact assessment is an important topic for future urban development. There are a large number of small towns in China, the current level of construction and development is uneven, the level of public service facilities is uneven, and there is a strong internal need for renewal and transformation. At the same time, small towns are important construction sites for building a walking and healthy “15-minute” cities due to their small urban scale. This article takes Quyang County, Hebei Province as an example, through multi-source data collection such as questionnaire surveys, big data collection, individual behavior logs, combined with data on the behavior characteristics of small towns residents, the distribution of public service facilities, and residents’ individual behavioral needs, scientifically evaluate the current situation of the layout of related facilities in the city, and then put forward targeted construction and optimization measures. From the travel range of residents of different ages, the “15-minute” cities are delineated, and from the perspective of public health, the three aspects of healthy framework—transportation system, healthy patches—public service facilities, healthy substrate—leisure space, construct a Specific “15-minute” citiy.
Presenters
HZ
Hao Zhang
North China University Of Technology
Co-authors
JL
Jing Li
North China University Of Technology
Research on feature recognition and optimization of public space in winter city based on the promotion of physical activity-A case study of HarbinView Abstract
Research Paper 01:00 PM - 02:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/10/29 10:00:00 UTC - 2021/10/29 11:30:00 UTC
Urban public space is an important space carrier of residents' physical activity. In winter city, residents' physical activities may present different patterns. With the development of digital media, it is possible to collect large-scale data of residents. Taking Harbin as an example, we collected the users’ data and their physical activity types and intensity from Sina Weibo, and mapped to GIS to explore its spatial and temporal distribution, and analyze the influencing factors and spatial composition. The results show that: residents’ physical activity show obvious weekend, holiday and seasonal fluctuations, and the space of individual and group activity preference is significantly different; climate conditions affect the time choice of activities; the type of public spaces has a significant impact on activities. Based on this, a method for promoting the layout and optimization of urban cold public space based on physical activity characteristic is proposed, which provides new insights for promoting the potential health benefits of urban public space in cold climates.
Presenters
SL
Shuai Liang
Harbin Institute Of Technology (HIT)
Co-authors
HL
Hong Leng
Harbin Institute Of Technology
Value Unlocked:Strategies on Connection between Green Open Space and Healthy Activity in Conghua,GuangzhouView Abstract
Research Paper 01:00 PM - 02:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/10/29 10:00:00 UTC - 2021/10/29 11:30:00 UTC
The COVID-19 epidemic has affected people's life activities, which makes the pursuit of health an important starting point for life behavior choices. Guangzhou Conghua is located in the northern part of the Guangdong-Hong Kong-Macao Greater Bay Area in China. This is an urban community area with diverse ecological elements and high-quality ecological environment. Mountains, rivers, forests, fields, lakes and other ecological elements are abundant in this area and its comprehensive air quality index ranks first in all districts in Guangzhou. After the COVID-19 epidemic, the green open space of Conghua has seen higher activity flow and activity intensity. During the Spring Festival holiday of 2021, the total number of tourists received in the region increased by 20.7% and tourism revenue increased by 48.04% compared with 2019 before the epidemic. Green open space has achieved a significant link with people's healthy life and it has played a more positive value in promoting health. This article analyzes the three characteristics of Conghua's green open space. First of these is the environmental quality. In 2020, the comprehensive ecological environment index reaches 86.7 in Conghua, ranking the forefront of the Pearl River Delta. The air quality, water environmental quality and acoustic environmental quality all reflect extremely high levels. The second is the scale. Large-scale ecological patches account for a large proportion, with a forest coverage rate of 69%, ranking first in Guangzhou. The third one is the distribution. Large-scale green patches are mainly concentrated in the northern mountain areas and urban parks and street parks are concentrated in the middle and the southern urban areas Both of them are connected through linear spaces such as ancient post roads, greenways, and fitness trails which shows ecological environment is well connected. After the COVID-19 epidemic, Conghua’s green open space activities have shown new characteristics. First, daily leisure activities prefer community parks with high convenience for sports activities, and weekend leisure activities prefer urban parks with high traffic accessibility and well-open space. Compared with the suburban ecological parks, the third is that vacation activities prefer the outer suburbs ecological parks with good environmental quality. Combining the above-mentioned preference relationship between green open space and living activities, this article proposes that after the COVID-19 epidemic, planning measures can be used to realize the link between green open space and healthy lifestyle, unlock the diversified value of green open space and create a distinctive healthy life model.
Presenters
WY
Weikai Yu
Senior Urban Planner , Guangzhou Urban Planning Design & Survey Research Institute
Co-authors
KY
Kejian Yu
Urban Planner, Guangzhou Urban Planning Design & Survey Research Institute
Envisioning Eco-scapes for Healthy Urban Environments: a future to indemnify the past through passive measuresView Abstract
Research Paper 01:00 PM - 02:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/10/29 10:00:00 UTC - 2021/10/29 11:30:00 UTC
India globally ranks 3rd and 1st for the percentage of Diabetic population and annual death rate due to Type 2 Diabetes respectively (Institute of Health Metrics and Evaluation, 2019). Similar physical and physiological health conditions have crept into the lives of urban residents across the globe, which is a matter of concern. The urban environments have been proven to be responsible through the encouragement of sedentary lifestyles, neglect of ecological resources, social exclusion etc. leading to fatal health challenges such as Hypertension, Obesity, Typhoid (State of Health of Delhi 2019) in the planned and unplanned neighbourhoods of Delhi. Envisioning for a future of health positive Indian cities, the research establishes fresh grounds of connections between space and illness, through an understanding of active and passive urban contributors to health, and the need for cities to reconsider the effect of the built and unbuilt environments on the residents rather than depending on health infrastructure. The focus on health in city planning in India can be dated back to 1956, with the engagement of the Ministry of Health with the Town Planning Organization to create the Interim General Plan for Greater Delhi. A U.S.A-read team of planners, headed by Albert Meyers, planned neighbourhoods such as Lajpat Nagar, Defence Colony, Patel Nagar, for the large influx of refugees post-partition, based on borrowed international standards. This top-down approach of creating uniformly planned health-centric neighbourhoods in terms of infrastructure and morphology has not been efficient enough due to neglect towards the non-uniform contexts they were placed in. International frameworks, such as the European Healthy Cities Network (WHO) has been successful in establishing healthy environments, by providing neighbourhood centric solutions, acknowledging the socio-economic groups. Also, authors like Cecily Maller and Dr. Howard Frumkin has delved into qualitative meanings of ‘Healthy Urban Environments’ and ‘Public Health’ respectively developing conceptual frameworks regarding the impact of physical, social and service environments on health. In the Indian context, there exist visibly diverse neighbourhoods, ranging from densely populated bastis housing low-income groups to the sparsely populated neighbourhoods housing high-income group which directly translates to the morphology and lifestyles of residents, leading to varied kinds of health problems. While most of these neighbourhoods meet the quantitative standards of the Master Plan, concerning the number of Mohalla Clinics, open-built ratio etc, certain unwritten aspects have still lead to deteriorated health. The research aims to enhance the health of individuals and the community as a whole through the upliftment of active and passive contributors to physical, social and ecological health, using urban design interventions focusing on the middle and upper-middle-income neighbourhood of Nizamuddin and Jangpura. The research on enhancing Public Health through Urban environments has gained momentum globally in recent times, with legislative bodies involving ecologists, transport planners, sociologists and other related experts, to make manuals applicable on different scales. Not limited to addressing today’s health and ecological concerns, Healthy Cities shall be a way of living for the Indian population. This cohesive understanding of individual, community and environment to understand and make more-than-human Healthy Urban Environments is exactly what the Indian cities have the potential to exhibit.
Presenters Saisha Mattoo
PhD In Urban Planning Student, University Of Southern California
Spatial distribution characteristics of cardiovascular disease (CVD) among urban residents and analysis of multiple environmental influencesView Abstract
Research Paper 01:00 PM - 02:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/10/29 10:00:00 UTC - 2021/10/29 11:30:00 UTC
With the development of urbanization, cardiovascular disease (CVD) poses a serious threat to urban health.The factors affecting health in CVD are multifaceted and comprehensive, and clarifying the spatial distribution characteristics of CVD and multiple environmental influences is conducive to improving proactive health interventions in urban environments and promoting sustainable urban development. In this study, we explored the spatial distribution characteristics of CVD mortality in Bengbu City, Huaihe River Basin, China, to investigate the correlation between multiple environmental influences and CVD mortality in 2019, and to reveal the mechanism of multiple environmental factors affecting mortality risk. Related studies showed that (1) the basic characteristics of the CVD death population are: males are higher than females; the older the age group, the higher the mortality rate; mostly unemployed; cardiac and cerebral infarction is the main cause of death; and mainly concentrated near the central city and old city. (2) Increased density of restaurants and tobacco stores around residential areas, higher traffic volume, dense residential and spatial forms, low green space coverage, and distance from rivers all increase CVD mortality. Therefore, adopting appropriate urban planning and policies can improve proactive health interventions in cities and reduce CVD mortality.
Presenters
BW
Beichen Wang
Anhui Jianzhu University
YL
Yuwei Li
Anhui Jianzhu University
JT
Jingjing Tang
Anhui Jianzhu University
A Framework for Constructing Biophilic Urban Nature——Based on the Analysis of Biophilic Aesthetics Cognition and Its Landscape Space CarriersView Abstract
Research Paper 01:00 PM - 02:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/10/29 10:00:00 UTC - 2021/10/29 11:30:00 UTC
Aesthetic cognition is an important component of landscape cognition and the development of human consciousness. The ecological dimension presented by the public in aesthetic cognition is often the key factor to measure the level of social ecological civilization construction. Compared with the ecological construction and regulation of physical space, it is also an important aspect to promote the leapfrog development of ecological civilization construction by bringing the public ecological consciousness to a deep ecological level of natural care and ethical justice through the construction of aesthetic cognition. Rooted in the basic cognition that "there is an innate emotional connection between human beings and life and life processes", biophilia emphasizes that human beings can maintain positive emotional response and behavioral expression to direct or indirect life stimuli. Based on people's inherent biophilic nature, guiding people to form biophilic aesthetic cognition through the biophilic landscape space identification, planning and design, is an effective means to enhance public ecological awareness. The research and practice related to the biophilic concept has always been a hot spot in international research, and mostly focused on the pure natural science and the micro and medium space scale, such as finding evidence in neuroscience, traceability of evolutionary ecology, measurement of environmental ecological psychology, architectural design and evaluation, and exploration of the aesthetic preferences of landscape experiencers for certain landscape features, however, there is relatively scarce research on a comprehensive framework of the planning and design methods of biophilic landscape space based on the urban scale. Taking the concept of biophilia as a new viewpoint, and based on the analysis of biophilia and biophilic aesthetic cognition, as well as the empirical research on biophilia promoting environmental preference, put up that nature, wilderness nature and urban nature are respectively the totality, origin and living landscape spaces supporting the occurrence of biophilic aesthetic cognition. Meanwhile, through three contents of design points, planning pictures and living visions, and with the urban biophilic green network, urban biophilic green community, and one-step away from nature as a scale framework, the living landscape space construction bearing the cognition of the biophilic aesthetics, namely the biophilic urban nature construction, was mainly explored. The aim is to provide useful reference for the construction of biophilic aesthetic cognition and the identification, planning and design of its landscape space carrier.
Presenters
YM
Yanhong MA
Assistant Professor, Chongqing University
Co-authors
XC
Xi CHEN
PhD Candidate, Harbin Institute Of Technology
Associate
,
Society for Good Health, Sustainable Development and Environmental Awareness, Nigeria
Professora Aux. Agreg.
,
Faculdade de Arquitetura, Universidade de Lisboa
Consultant | Urban Researcher | Architect
,
Universitat Internacional de Catalunya / Technische Universität Darmstadt
Dalian University of Technology
Research Assistant
,
Institute for China Sustainable Urbanization, Tsinghua University
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 Olga Jerjomina
ISOCARP - Technical Administrator
 Serin Geambazu
associate professor
,
Ion Mincu University of Architecture and Urban Planning
Assoc. Prof Laura Verdelli
Lecturer
,
University of Tours, France
Student
,
Kyoto University
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