Track 1: Inclusiveness and empowerment. Al-Majlis: planning with and for communities Virtual Room 1
Nov 09, 2021 11:00 AM - 01:00 PM(Asia/Qatar)
20211109T1100 20211109T1300 Asia/Qatar Virtual Only | Track 1 | Session 3. Sustainable Urbanism

Among the three pillars of sustainability (social, environmental and economic) the social pillar remains under-represented in many parts of the world. Cities are developing into uneven environments in social terms and human aspirations as well as rights for a better living are often jeopardised. However, new and innovative examples and approaches show that achieving social sustainability is reachable. The presentations in this session will address various issues of achieving a more sustainable city in terms of inclusiveness and empowerment of citizens. 

Virtual Room 1 57th ISOCARP World Planning Congress in Doha, Qatar ajuurinen@xtalks.com

Among the three pillars of sustainability (social, environmental and economic) the social pillar remains under-represented in many parts of the world. Cities are developing into uneven environments in social terms and human aspirations as well as rights for a better living are often jeopardised. However, new and innovative examples and approaches show that achieving social sustainability is reachable. The presentations in this session will address various issues of achieving a more sustainable city in terms of inclusiveness and empowerment of citizens. 

An investigation of the nature of residential mobility in the informal settlements: The case of slums of Dhaka, BangladeshView Abstract
Research Paper 11:00 AM - 01:00 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/09 08:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/09 10:00:00 UTC
The pattern of residential mobility varies throughout the world. Slum populations consistently report higher rates of residential mobility than other populations. However, the pattern and the consequences of residential mobility of the slum dwellers are not well studied. Dhaka, the Capital of Bangladesh, has a large population, more than 14 million of which about 1.06 million live in a slum with an increase of 60.73 percent in the last 17 years. The objectives of this paper are: (1) to identify the significant factors of residential mobility of slum dwellers; and (2) to examine the patterns of residential mobility of slum dwellers in three slums area located in Dhaka. This study further analyzed the impacts of residential mobility on the socio-economic aspect of the slum dwellers. For this research purpose, 267 households from three slums of Dhaka namely Kallyanpur slum, Agargaon slum, and Karwan Bazar railgate slum were selected through non-probability convenience sampling and interviewed. This study found that residential mobility was influenced by factors which are related to life cycle; employment, income and distress; land tenure and homeownership; neighbourhood condition and grouping issues. Among all the studied variables the most five significant factors influencing residential mobility are slum eviction, unavailability of utility services, marriage, changing job and getting homeownership status. It is revealed that the nature of the residential mobility for the surveyed slum dwellers is mainly negative and it poses a significant impact on the socio-economic aspects of life. The findings of the study pave the way to recommend specific measures for the slum dwellers to improve their condition by lessening the negative impacts of residential mobility.
Presenters
SA
Shammi Akter
Professor, Department Of Urban And Regional Planning, Jahangirnagar University
Eco-Neighbourhood report---exploring a sustainable community on CoganView Abstract
Research Paper 11:00 AM - 01:00 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/09 08:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/09 10:00:00 UTC
The aspiration of this report is to evaluate Cogan station which is based on evidence proposed by Cardiff Council and research analysis. The Cardiff Capital Metro is an ambitious programme to provide an accessible network connecting regional areas to various stations. As a key station to deliver passengers between Vale of Glamorgan and Cardiff, Cogan station became a platform which could stimulate opportunities for regional development and regeneration. In addition, authority could enable to handle challenges through the transformation towards an ecological and sustainable community. There are three main components in the report: evaluating the status quo of the site, providing an evidence-based analysis of the programme and proposing a mechanism to achieve a livable and walkable neighborhood. It might boost local economy and provide ideas for a sustainable transport in other regions. Data was collected through research, observation, and surveys.
Presenters
YC
YUE CUI
SHENZHEN,GUANGDONG,CHINA, CHINA ACADEMY OF URBAN PLANNING & DESIGN, SHENZHEN BRANCH
Transformations of the Emirati housing typologies. A survey on the trending urban condition and cultural clashes.View Abstract
Research Paper 11:00 AM - 01:00 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/09 08:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/09 10:00:00 UTC
It was since the inception of a modernized Abu Dhabi in the late 60s that its housing has been evolving as well. Land allocation to Emirati nationals, the founding of a national housing program and the very new Master Plans for Abu Dhabi were all parts of a major effort of Sheikh Zayed to settle down a primarily nomadic population and provide contemporary amenities and services without compromising their cultural identity. Housing – both individual and social – transformed equally fast to the city itself – from the “Arish” and the “Sha`abi” house to the “western villa”, thus creating a cultural clash, a paradox between the Islamic-Arabic lifestyle and the imported socio-architectural properties of the villa type. This paradox is strengthened by the environmental behavior of the buildings within the climatic context. However, it is due to a demand increase and to the latest international socio-economic developments that the current national housing model should reconsider its strategic options in terms of the architectural typologies and the urban footprint used so far. Furthermore, a shift in global urbanism and housing towards open and inclusive cities and against the spatial manifestation of zoning and horizontal sprawl have reopened the agenda on neighborhood densification, housing typologies and a renegotiation of the usage of urban land. The paper attempts to address the questions regarding this cultural paradox, by highlighting the users’ perspective. It presents the findings of a survey amongst Emirati nationals with regards to the compatibility between their cultural daily patterns and their housing. By providing insightful critique on their housing properties and their performance on key notions such as privacy, space, religion, climate, family and car dependency, the respondents assist in depicting their needs. The results of this survey and their interpretation could lead to possible shifts in the housing strategy and policies of the city and the Emirate of Abu Dhabi and potentially to other cities in the Gulf region.
Presenters Apostolos Kyriazis
Assistant Professor Of Architecture, Abu Dhabi University
Co-authors
MI
Magdy Ibrahim
Associate Professor Of Architecture, Abu Dhabi University
Assessing local social sustainability: Lessons learned from testing the Place Standard Tool in Kristiansand, NorwayView Abstract
Case Study Report 11:00 AM - 01:00 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/09 08:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/09 10:00:00 UTC
Social sustainability has been increasingly discussed in scholarly research. Several attempts have been made to conceptualize and measure social sustainability in urban contexts. However, although researchers seem to be more and more interested in social sustainability, the concept has not been extensively applied in urban governance and planning practice. Practitioners and decision makers often lack concrete knowledge and the tools needed to assess social sustainability and develop their local communities accordingly. Moreover, there is often a lack of processes and frameworks involving residents in efforts to shape socially sustainable communities. In this paper, we present results and experiences from testing the application of local social sustainability in practice. Municipal coordinators, urban planners, and researchers have collaborated and used the Place Standard Tool to assess local social sustainability based on residents’ insights. The aim was to obtain necessary knowledge on residents’ perceptions of their local physical and social environment but also to mobilize residents to participate in shaping their local community based on social sustainability goals. The case area was the district of Tinnheia in Kristiansand, Norway, a district that has been under ongoing local development processes. Thus, the application of the Place Standard Tool in this district aimed at testing a real case example of how the assessment of social sustainability can contribute to planning and shaping new urban development. Using the Place Standard Tool, we assessed local social sustainability in two ways representing a mixed-methods approach: (1) as a survey tool and (2) as a dialogue and co-creation tool. First, based on the Place Standard Tool, we conducted a survey with adult residents (N=358) of the district collecting quantitative evaluations on fourteen main physical and social characteristics of the area and qualitative input on places to be improved. Second, we used the questions of the Place Standard Tool on the fourteen key characteristics to guide qualitative discussions during walking tours and focus groups with selected residents. Invited residents for dialogue and co-creation were groups who might have not been sufficiently represented in participatory processes. Groups comprised ethnic minorities, older adults, young adults, and families with children. Testing the use of the Place Standard Tool for measuring local social sustainability and integrating it into urban planning processes have provided several lessons for urban governance and planning practice. First, the tool can offer a structured, user-friendly framework for assessing residents’ subjective evaluations of local social sustainability and can be applied without requiring the assistance of an expert or scholarly researcher. Second, performing such evaluations in a systematic way can be a useful addition that has been often missing from urban planning practice. Third, using the tool for both survey and dialogue can offer complementary benefits: a combination of quantitative and qualitative data and a combination of large-scale assessment, in-depth qualitative understanding, and co-creation process. Survey data from the Place Standard Tool can reveal strengths and weaknesses of places, while using the Place Standard Tool for dialogue can offer a more nuanced understanding but also mobilize residents to co-create solutions for local development. Fourth, residents’ evaluations on key place characteristics are more meaningful if used comparatively across places, neighborhoods, or districts. Fifth, attention should be paid to the representativeness and the particularities of groups involved in the survey and qualitative discussions. Finally, it should be noted that the use of the Place Standard Tool cannot on its own provide a holistic assessment of local social sustainability. Residents’ insights from using the tool should be complemented with an assessment of a variety of objectively measured indicators related to social sustainability.
Presenters
SB
Stine Busborg Sagen
Project Manager, Kristiansand Municipality
Co-authors
KM
Kostas Mouratidis
Postdoctoral Researcher, Norwegian University Of Life Sciences
HH
Hege Hofstad
Research Professor, Oslo Metropolitan University
Vulnerability and coping mechanism: A case study of informal (tea) stalls in public places of Dhaka city.View Abstract
Research Paper 11:00 AM - 01:00 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/09 08:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/09 10:00:00 UTC
The focus of the research, which started with an endeavor to understand infraordinary spaces— tea stalls, as a condition and catalyst for social coexistence took a shift especially after the drastic impact of the unprecedented situation—Covid-19 lockdown, on the life and livelihoods of the research community. While here, the tea stall has been placed as the most widely existing type of street food stalls– Dhaka’s streets, like most other South Asian countries, are lined with all kinds of food stalls operated by vendors carrying different degrees of informality. Despite having a significant role in building the socio-cultural landscape, these stalls were found to be extremely vulnerable to various forces which eventually project threats to their livelihoods and existence. Amidst the pandemic, the vulnerability of such spaces and the vendors surfaced as an alarming phenomenon that needed to be addressed immediately to mitigate further economic and health risks of this large number of people involved in this sector. Therefore, by understanding different degrees of vulnerability, the research aims to identify the assets the vendors have at their disposal to ameliorate the vulnerability from a ‘community strengthening’ vantage point. The research found that the livelihoods of the vendors are politicized by various actors which eventually turns the public spaces into a contested area. The hierarchical relation with these actors does not only create a barrier to community bonding but also affects the asset management of the vendors and makes them prone to economic vulnerability. The paper also recommends immediate measures, both spatial and operational, to slow down the poverty slide of these marginalized people due to the lockdown. Drawing upon the findings, the researcher proposes an ‘iceberg model of vulnerability’ to understand the underlying vulnerabilities of the research community and also to track down the gaps prevailing at the institutional level for egalitarian and inclusive policies. Keywords: informality, street vendors, vulnerability, coping mechanism, Dhaka, Bangladesh
Presenters Ishika Alim
Graduate, Stuttgart University
Intelligent Assessment, Diagnosis and Planning of All-age Friendly Communities Based on Random ForestView Abstract
Research Paper 11:00 AM - 01:00 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/09 08:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/09 10:00:00 UTC
The research focuses on the background of sustainable human development and high-quality urbanization development, taking the community as the research unit to explore the realization of human-oriented, refined and intelligent planning in China's stock planning period in the new era. It constructs a comprehensive assessment index system of all-age friendliness based on the concept of “All-Age Friendly”, and all-age friendly community assessment model with Random Forest model to accurately evaluate the status quo of “All-Age” degree of communities. Furthermore, the research analyzes the coordinated development and internal mechanism between multi-factors and multi-groups, as well as them, and accurately diagnoses the "weakness" of all-age friendly community based on massive cases. Finally, according to the assessment and diagnosis results, the research puts forward refined improvement strategies, intelligently generate planning projects and planning governance tools, and assists the sustainable growth of the full life cycle with urban planning and governance. In general, through the construction of All-Age evaluation index system and a large number of All-Age community cases, the research explored a complete set of intelligent planning realization path with refined assessment, accurate diagnosis and planning based on the machine learning model based on Random Forest.
Presenters
GL
Geqi Luo
Student, Hunan Normal University
Co-authors
CL
Chao Liang
Student, Hunan Normal University
JH
Junlin Huang
Senior Engineer Of Urban Planning, Hunan Normal University
Urban Old Community Renewal and Governance Path from the Perspective of Micro-renewal —— A Case Study of Chongqing Jijiang PeninsulaView Abstract
Case Study Report 11:00 AM - 01:00 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/09 08:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/09 10:00:00 UTC
With the arrival of the post-epidemic era, the process of urban development in China has changed from rapid incremental expansion to medium-high-speed stock and high-quality development. Old community renewal has changed from simple material space research to comprehensive study of material and social coupling. The accumulation of "urban diseases" in old communities under high-speed urbanization has gradually increased, resulting in residents in a long-term state of pressure, which has a negative impact on their physical and mental health. The deteriorating ecological environment and stressful living environment of old communities are losing health support. Due to the late exploration of transformation, the lag of renewal theory and mechanism, and the slow progress, Chongqing is faced with the severe task of community renewal and governance. Based on the concept of micro-renewal planning and aiming at the bottleneck of the existing renewal and governance in Chongqing, this paper explores the upgrading path of the old community in Chongqing based on the analysis of the value demand of community renewal and the difficulties of urban renewal,an urban old community renewal and governance path framework is formed. Based on this,the article takes the Jijiang peninsula along the river gateway area in southwest Chongqing as an example for investigation and research.First of all, through the ecological, cultural and life satisfaction survey of the old community, the comprehensive community status quo is carried out, and the asset bank and problem bank of the old community in Jijiang peninsula are established.Secondly, in view of the investigation results and the present situation of the old community, the renewal and governance path combined with structural renewal and unit governance is adopted to promote the community space network repair and community governance unit optimization at the same time. Finally, through the establishment of four types of short-term and long-term community renewal project database dynamic tracking and promoting the implementation of community renewal and governance, so as to gradually improve the living environment level of community residents in Jijiang Peninsula.At the same time, this paper can provide some reference for the general old community renewal and governance practice in Chongqing.
Presenters Leiyu Fu
Postgraduate, School Of Architecture And Urban Planning Chongqing University
The Research on construction standard of differentiated community life circle in JianShui County based on mobile signaling dataView Abstract
Case Study Report 11:00 AM - 01:00 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/09 08:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/09 10:00:00 UTC
At present, the new concept of community life circle has become the common pursuit of people, in order to create a residential space with intensive land use, environment-friendly, full of vitality and diversity of facilities. In 2016, Shanghai issued the guidelines for the planning of 15 minute community life circle in Shanghai, "15 minute community life circle", which proposed that there are perfect public facilities such as education, commercial transportation, sports, pension and so on within the 15 minute walking distance of the home-centered. However, due to the heterogeneity of urban space, there are great differences in the scope of residents' life circle in different locations and different types of residential areas. Understanding the current situation of life circle and comparing with the goal of 15 minute life circle is the basic guarantee for the implementation of life circle construction. Based on the mobile signaling data, this paper takes the central urban area of JianShui County as the research object, and selects each residential area of JianShui County as the analysis sample to analyze the current situation and characteristics of community life circle in the central urban area of JianShui County. This paper analyzes the difference of day and night population vitality in the central urban area of JianShui County by using mobile phone signaling data. Two measurement methods, population vitality and 15 minute life circle coverage, are used to describe the problems existing in the current life circle. According to the problems existing in the community life circle, and the corresponding population concentration and space-time differences in the demand for public service facilities, further differentiation guide the construction of community life circle in JianShui County.
Presenters
XL
Xin Liu
Shanghai Tongji Urban Planning And Design Institute Co., Ltd
Co-authors
WX
Wei Xie
Jianshui County Natural Resources Bureau
TP
Tongshuai Pu
Honghe Prefecture Natural Resources And Planning Bureau
Residential space differentiation and social integration of typical settlements in the typical area of Beijing second Green Belt - a case study of three communities in Cuigezhuang TownshipView Abstract
Research Paper 11:00 AM - 01:00 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/09 08:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/09 10:00:00 UTC
With the development of urbanization, the differentiation and polarization of social space is the main feature of urban fringe. In order to pursue economic benefits and out of the desire for urban life, a large number of immigrants enter the urban fringe areas which provide a large number of cheap rental housing, showing a strong mixed and heterogeneous residential space. Especially in Beijing Second Green Belt, there are not only aboriginal villages and towns, but also special villages and communities such as "express village", "takeaway village", "ant village" and "art village" which can accommodate the employment and residence of immigrants. But many residents are still only a "marginalized" role in urban construction and development, only realizing regional transfer, and failing to really enter into the society. Therefore, the research on the residential space differentiation and social integration of the typical settlements of Beijing Second Green Belt has become an important entry point for the sustainable development of mega cities. However, many scholars at home and abroad ignore the differences of individual attributes in the migrant population, and the research scale is generally from housing to city, while the research on community scale is less. Therefore, this paper selects three communities in Cuigezhuang township, a typical area of Beijing Second Green Belt as the research objects, and takes Hegezhuang village (the resident village of artists and other immigrants), Jingwang community (the relocation community of local residents in each village after the demolition of Cuigezhuang township) as the research object Taking Dongxindian village (the resident village of taxi drivers and other resident villages) as an example, this paper tries to ensure the typicality and representativeness of the survey samples. This paper mainly adopts the methods of field survey, questionnaire interview, GPS, GIS and Stata. Based on the number, location and living conditions of different types of residents in the three communities, Moran'i index of GIS is used to reveal the characteristics of residential spatial differentiation; At the same time, GPS was used to collect the 24-hour activity types and paths of different residents to depict the spatial characteristics of residents' daily life and work behavior. Then, it constructs the social integration system of residents including economy, culture, psychology, social participation and communication. Through the processing of the questionnaire data, it calculates the integration index of different types of community residents. On this basis, we use Stata statistical software to establish a multiple regression model to analyze the main factors affecting integration. The results show that, firstly, three communities all show the phenomenon of residential space differentiation. The groups with different socio-economic status have different choices of residential space. The residents with high socio-economic status live in better living conditions, ordinary wage earners and office workers below middle income often live in a courtyard with more than a dozen people; Secondly, there are significant differences in the integration index between different types of community residents and the city, that is, the residents living in Jingwang community have a higher degree of social integration, and also show a positive attitude and good expectations for community affairs participation and communication, while the residents in Hegezhuang village and Dongxindian village have a lower degree of social integration; Third, the special urban planning structure of native place, economic income, occupation status, living environment, cultural level, housing ownership and the second green road are the main factors affecting residents' urban integration. The research results provide more comprehensive optimization strategies for the government in promoting and guiding the planning and transformation of Beijing Second Green Belt in urban fringe and promoting the social integration of residents.
Presenters
YL
Yuting Li
Haidian District Of Beijing, Beijing Forestry University
Research On The Internal Logic And Practical Path Of Community Empowerment Under Co-Building And Sharing Mechanism HorizonView Abstract
Case Study Report 11:00 AM - 01:00 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/09 08:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/09 10:00:00 UTC
The spirit and practice of community development have been existing in China's traditional society for a long time. The traditional top-down management has gradually emerged disadvantages in the governance of old city communities. Some plan implementations are facing ownership issues, financial problems, etc. A range of users’ demands cannot be taken into account within the upper decision. In this context, community empowerment has become a hot topic under the background of the new period planning, which is a methodology that starts from community life, gathers all kinds of social forces and resources, and completes the process of self-organisation, self-governance, and self-development through the mobilization and actions of people in the community. However, the growing economy and the changing industrial structure have pushed a large floating population into urban centres recently, which leads to chaos and alienation are filled in the old residential districts and urban villages, and social trust is gradually faded in the neighbourhood as well. Some notions that social trust, reciprocal norms, and relationship networks are important factors to realize community empowerment. This study will explore the effective way to stimulate residents' awareness of participation and enhance their ability to participate in governance through reinventing social relationship networks within the neighbourhood. With community empowerment as the primary scope of this study, this research will focus on the different interaction forms between residents and their community public spaces under different planning disciplines globally. The comparison will be made via analysing different existing community living models across the world including the residential model of Danwei in the period of planned economy of China, and the co-living model in the Danish and the USA, etc. In addition, to demonstrate how would the effective planning and empowerment mechanism affect the community spaces, and what barriers would occur during the implementation process, the research will then move onto the studies of practical projects in Shanghai and Guangzhou as well as author’s practical planning experiences in two counties, Cixi in Zhejiang Province and Hekou in Yunnan Province, as representatives of both aspects of geographic locations and economic volumes, which will be comprehensively covering the variety of community empowerment in the context of today’s China. In conclusion, it is the fact that communication and publicity play important roles in community empowerment in China based on the unique land system and the weak sense of public participation of residents. Compared with emphasizing public participation directly in community planning at the beginning, it is vital to make community residents understand what their rights and obligations are through introducing community planner system. Only when residents understand that community planning is related to their vital interests can they really pay attention to community planning and take the initiative to participate in it and put forward their opinions,which is the ideal result of the community empowerment. Key words: public participation, social trust, relationship networks, community planner
Presenters Ying Lin
Shanghai Tongji Urban Planning And Design Institute Co., Ltd.
The African-Irish (AI) Coalition for an Open Society View Abstract
Case Study Report 11:00 AM - 01:00 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/09 08:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/09 10:00:00 UTC
Fostering open conversation injects innovative ideas and strategies accessible to all people. Against the backdrop of the end of oil, climate change, pandemics, and other converging catastrophes in cities where online education and work, civic engagement and social unrest are increasingly common, there is only one institutional remedy – knowledge based urban development (KBUD) to build back better, safer, and fairer cities (Alraouf, 2020; Boehnert, 2012; Kunstler, 2006). Since COVID-19, we can observe the centrality of online platforms. On the one hand, online platforms have diminished the institutional relevance of university campuses and corporate headquarters, while on the other it has disrupted complex socio-technical, cultural and political systems. An Open Society generates holistic knowledge rather than scattered, fragmented and isolated research centres or higher education based on ICT facilities. This is necessary to defuse the deep structural conflicts when transforming our carbon society. All-inclusive knowledge networks must be established by sectors of the community to confront employability, the crisis of post-secondary education, political radicalism and cities that become unliveable as they are deserted by qualified workers. Pivoting from the national “Smart City” debate in Canada, the absence of grassroots planner’s skilled in post-carbon narratives explains Google’s Sidewalk Labs decision to pull out of Toronto. The creation of the African-Irish (AI) Coalition aims to establish a Smart City policy of global significance by exploring the Irish Memorial Park alongside Open Science advocates. This approach alludes to the post-World War period, where urban renewal projects across North America required vulnerable groups to form multi-ethnic coalitions to stop gentrification, establish community centres and build affordable housing (Kim, 2020). KBUD generates many questions about an urban post-carbon society and the usage of new education technology. For example, how must citizens mobilize public solutions to rising global inequalities? A digital revolution for sustainable urbanism comprehends historic undercurrents of race, transnationalism and politics (de Laurentis, 2021; Thompson, 2020). To orient social change intelligently the AI Coalition primes a critical conversation about contagious structural dynamics of industrialization, questionable land ownership, and repulsive political and religious interference that led to 170 years of the famine memorial’s neglect. Open Science argues that education prioritizing wealth is a kind of high treason. Exigencies of the civic engagement in a knowledge economy require access to free scientific research to promote democracy, alongside healthy and ecological living. To expand, deepen and mobilize scholarly Open Science globally, this project draws from the expertise of the “Association science et bien commun” (ASBC), a publishing house and resource for cognitive justice with privileged links in Africa and Haiti. Established in 2011, the ASBC is a member of Radical Open Access and publisher of a Diamond Open Access journal. The late ASBC president, Florence Piron co-authored “Open Science Beyond open Access: For and with communities.” Existing platforms bridging local and global citizenship, such as Edmonton’s Africa Centre, do not provide a brave space to share stories and generate an Open Society. Holistic knowledge ties local history and community responsibility. The Irish Memorial Park must embed a global legacy for the 6000 famine victims and the volunteers that sacrificed their lives to assist the destitute immigrants afflicted by typhoid. To avoid urban conflict and exodus caused by energy and education disruptions, the case study envisions conceptual tools for a conscience of place that modernizes synergies between humans, the environment and new education technologies (Magnaghi, 2014, p. 6). The AI Coalition is a new global paradigm for knowledge-intensive “urban bio-regions” that empowers multi-ethnic transnational communities to adopt resilience and self-sufficiency.
Presenters Paul Murphy
Research Associate, Rural Municipalities Of Alberta
Exploration of the built environment of age-friendly communities:A Photovoice StudyView Abstract
Research Paper 11:00 AM - 01:00 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/09 08:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/09 10:00:00 UTC
With the rapid development of urbanization and the aging population, it is very important to actively promote the construction of a safe, comfortable, convenient, and livable environment for the elderly. Neighborhood built environment has a significant impact on the health and wellbeing of older adults. However, from the perspective of the perception of the elderly, few studies exploring the characteristics of the neighborhood-built environment that affect the health of older adults. This paper considers opportunities, challenges, and solutions of using photovoice methods for focusing on one aspect of older people's experiences in the neighborhood-built environment. Photovoice as a research methodology is used in this article, which can offer participants an opportunity to reflect on personal and community strengths, create critical dialogue, share knowledge about personal and community issues, and develop and host discussions for the presentation of their lived experiences and priorities through images, language, and context. This pilot study uses the method of photovoice to explore aspects of the neighborhood-built environment considered by older adults as important in facilitating aging in place. We conducted a photovoice study in which 32 older adults (aged 60 years or more) living in the TJ community, a high-density built environment community in downtown Shanghai, China in 2019. From the perspective of the elderly, each participant was asked to take photos that illustrated age-friendly features they considered essential for supporting their lives in the community. A total of 196 photos were collected. Subsequently, they participated in a follow-up individual interview and discussed the positive or negative built environment that affects their daily activities. All photographs, photo journals, and additional write-ups were then collected, organized, and coded by researchers. The content of the interviews was analyzed by natural language processing and semantic network analysis. And then the processed text was completed by topic coding, creating categories, abstracting. Based on a theoretically informed analysis of the data, the analysis revealed three themes: (1)outdoor space and buildings, (2)transportation, and (3)housing. These themes are the main built environment characteristics that older adults perceive to influence most. Firstly, green space, parks, sidewalks, and squares are the topics most concerned by the elderly. The cleanliness and safety of its outdoor space are seen as a barrier to physical activity and daily walking. Secondly, the quality of housing affects the quality of life of the elderly, and the lack of sunlight in the rooms all year round has an impact on the health of the elderly. Thirdly, a walkable environment and rich street facilities can support older people’s physical activity. In addition, a few themes are more oriented to social context, for example, public participation, social inclusion, peer support. Meanwhile, Photovoice as community-based participatory research shows great potential in the dissemination of vulnerable person relevant voice, and encourage critical dialogue between participants, and city stakeholders.
Presenters
QZ
Qinglai Zhang
PhD Student, School Of Architecture And Urban Planning, Tongji University
Co-authors
YS
Yuanyi Shen
Master, Tongji University
YY
Yifan Yu
Professor, Tongji University
Superblocks Practice in the Southern, Brasilia and Sha Tin, Hong KongView Abstract
Research Paper 11:00 AM - 01:00 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/09 08:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/09 10:00:00 UTC
This paper studies the construction of communities in the south of Brasilia under the theory of "modern city" by Le Corbusier after the second industrial revolution, and compares it with the communities in the New Town of Sha Tin, and discusses the process of the practice of livable communities in the 20th century. Through two cases with similar forms and similar construction time, that is, the southern area of Brasilia and Sha Tin New Town of Hong Kong, this paper compares the community construction mode. Through literature analysis, comparative analysis and empirical analysis, the number of public service facilities, residential building scale and other information are counted, and the conclusion is drawn. The modern city of Le Corbusier has many shortcomings, such as overemphasis on urban functional zoning, inadequate urban scale, inability to attract a large number of people to live in, and limited utilization of service facilities. But lower community density can reduce the spread of the virus. The original intention of community construction of public housing estates in Sha Tin New Town is to solve the problem of dense urban population and deteriorating living environment. Years of construction results have formed a perfect service supporting system to meet the living needs of a large number of people, and play a very important role in boosting the economic development of Hong Kong New Territories. But dense populations and vertical living patterns increase the risk of the virus spreading. The communities of the future will be more livable, more diverse and more resilient.
Presenters
CJ
CHEN Junhao
Master, City University Of Hong Kong
Future of Urban Villages : Research and Development Strategy View Abstract
Research Paper 11:00 AM - 01:00 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/09 08:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/09 10:00:00 UTC
In India’s six largest metros (Delhi, Mumbai, Kolkata, Chennai, Hyderabad and Bengaluru), 48% of its residents were migrants in 2011. This number is projected to become over 50% by 2021. In the case of such metros, like Delhi, the “Urban villages”, along with other unplanned development, have become migrant hotspots, mainly due to its affordable housing options and advantageous locations within the city. They have become, the entry points into the city, for the underprivileged migrant, seeking the city, and its opportunities. As a result of the rapid urban expansion, the city of Delhi, absorbed its hinterlands, engulfing these villages, within the planned city fabric. However, the system of Urban Governance and certain policies, dating back to the colonial era, demarking these settlements as 'Lal Dora' in 1908 - to September 2020; the lieutenant governor of Delhi declaring 79 more 'Lal Dora' villages as “Urban villages”, taking the total tally of such Urban villages to 214. This has resulted in them, being exempted from the development framework of the larger city. This led to the settlements, molded by the forces of change, adapting to their context and adjacencies. They are now highly dense, socio-culturally diverse islands, within the modern Indian Metro, while remaining outside the usual Legal framework of development. In order to meet census requirements, these settlements were given the inherently contradictory names of “Urban Villages’. With prolonged neglect, they have become dense settlements, with unhealthy living conditions ; improper water & waste management, inadequate light and ventilation, while being a fire & construction hazard. Socially, there is clear class segregation between the owners and migrant tenants. There is no representation for these migrants, in matters of decision making even though they are the majority, or the population living in it. The migrants, have no sense of belonging, as there are no inclusive public spaces or opportunities for recreational and socio-cultural association. The prosperity and role, of this temporary heterogeneous group, has never been acknowledged, nor planned for, by the development authorities. This paper attempts to understand the relationship between the Urban village and the City, the needs and aspirations of the migrants in them, and the forces of change around these villages and their implications on future development. It also proposes a framework of development, that creates an inclusive, sustainable model of development, for Urban Villages, which guides their transformation, catalyzing a better quality of life and sense of belonging for all, with a focus on, the underprivileged migrant population. Through the use of spatial documentation, personal interviews and Focus Group Discussions held among the various stakeholders, this paper attempts to comprehend the true nature of the Urban village and its people The framework uses a public-private-partnership scheme, which will strategizes a developmental model, that uplifts the migrants through capacity building, economic and systematic support and create points of interest and association, for all. It argues that, to improve the quality of life for all while being socially just, the interventions should focus on the everyday patterns of live - work - play, of its stakeholders, as well as the socio-economical, administrative and morphological aspects of the Urban Village, holistically. It works through a responsibility model, which is a midpoint between the top down and bottom up approach of development. When Implemented to its full extend, it will play a role in fulfilling the needs and aspirations, creating a sustainable model of development for the Urban Villages, blurring the boundaries, socio-spatially, between the Landlords and the Migrant Tenants. the Insiders and Outsiders, and ultimately the Village and the City.
Presenters
HK
Hari Krishnan
Architect, Urban Designer And Independent Researcher, , Independent Researcher
Uneven development of Moscow in the context of the current spatial structure of the modern metropolisView Abstract
Research Paper 11:00 AM - 01:00 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/09 08:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/09 10:00:00 UTC
The purpose of this study is to analyze the influence of post-socialist transit on spatial equality in Moscow. By spatial equality, we mean the availability of citizens to everyday services and amenities that are provided by private companies and public authorities. We aim to research what spatial patterns modern Moscow has inherited from socialism, how spatial inequality reveals itself in the different city’s zones. This research aims to develop studies of inequality and inclusion problems in XXI century global cities. The topic of spatial segregation in cities of Global South and Global North is discussed in academic journals. The study of Mexico City shows that income segregation leads to an unequal supply of goods and services, so a significant part of the population is deprived of access to important collective goods. In poor areas, not only is accessibility (measured in quantitative terms) worse, but the quality of services and goods provided is also lower (Ruiz-Rivera et al, 2016). The class structure of London is studied in a spatial framework (Cunningham, Savage, 2017; Manley, Johnston, 2014). The methodology of the study includes the following: 1) Development of an expert grid for spatial analysis – about 1000 cells, due to the lack of census tracts or their analogs in Russia. 2) Use of data on prices for residential real estate as a substitute for the incomes of the citizens since such information is not published in Russia. 3) Use of data on residential and non-residential buildings. 4) Use of spatial data analysis – hot spot analysis (Getis-Ord Gi*) for cluster identification and research of spatial patterns in modern Moscow with data about citizens’ employment, real estate prices, and accessibility of local goods. 5) Use of a linear regression lets us to evaluate significance of various spatial factors for accessibility of local goods as road density, population, building development, citizens’ employment, the quality of housing, etc. Planned study results: 1) Zoning of Moscow was carried out on the basis of hot spot analysis with the purpose of revealing the territories having different level of accessibility to everyday services and amenities. 2) We will prove that contemporary uneven development in Moscow connects with uneven development in socialist period. Elite and non-elite settlement zones are revealed and identified, especially marginalized zones and zones linked with citizens’ employment. The analysis shows that the Soviet social stratification of society, expressed through the spatial distribution of population groups – primarily factory workers, elite groups and intellectuals, exists even after a quarter of a century has an impact on the vote. 3) We plan to determine how the adaptation of different forms of socialist development affects the level of accessibility to everyday services and amenities. In Moscow, there are several forms of development: the early mass industrial housing (1957-1965) – this is mainly the middle zone of the city, the late Soviet mass housing (1965-1991), built mainly with the help of greenfield development on the outskirts of the city, and post-socialist residential areas built with the help of greenfield development, brownfield development and infill development. In addition, the Central business district, which includes both a historical city and residential areas, will be analyzed. Referneces: Ruiz-Rivera N., Suarez M., Delgado-Campos J. (2016). Urban Segregation and Local Retail Environments. Evidence from Mexico City. Habitat International. - No 5. – pp. 58-64. Cunningham N., Savage M. (2017) An intensifying and elite city, City, Vol. 21. No. 1. – pp. 25-46. David Manley D., Johnston R. (2014). London: A dividing city, 2001–11? City, Vol. 18. No. 6. – pp. 633-643.
Presenters
AG
Anton Gorodnichev
Lecturer, HSE University
Co-authors
ES
Elena Skrebkova
Deputy Head Of The Research Department, Transport Design Studio
SHENZHEN,GUANGDONG,CHINA
,
CHINA ACADEMY OF URBAN PLANNING & DESIGN, SHENZHEN BRANCH
Assistant Professor of Architecture
,
Abu Dhabi University
Project manager
,
Kristiansand Municipality
graduate
,
Stuttgart University
Student
,
Hunan Normal University
+ 10 more speakers. View All
 Olga Jerjomina
ISOCARP - Technical Administrator
Student
,
Tianjin University
 Munawar Irfaan S
Urban Design graduate
,
School of Planning and Architecture , New Delhi
Ms Wenzhuo Zhang
PhD Candidate
,
The Australian National University
Ph.D Student
,
College of architecture and urban planning, Tongji University
Shenzhen University
+2 more attendees. View All
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