Track 2: Well-being and health. Al-Fereej: caring for living conditions Virtual Room 2
Nov 09, 2021 11:00 AM - 01:00 PM(Asia/Qatar)
20211109T1100 20211109T1300 Asia/Qatar Virtual Only | Track 2 | Session 3. Conceiving spaces for all

The fight of disabled minorities in the name of equal human rights has made possible to question the design of collective spaces to make them accessible to all. These struggles for accessible spaces have inspired broader reflections on the need to support the development of inclusive societies. This line of thought can be applied to different disciplines and in particular to spatial planning, which can subtly promote a wide range of practices, from social justice to food security. The presentations that follow present reflections on the design of living spaces that increase the level of well-being of everyone, from childhood to old age, whatever the physical abilities or the living standards of people. 

Virtual Room 2 57th ISOCARP World Planning Congress in Doha, Qatar ajuurinen@xtalks.com

The fight of disabled minorities in the name of equal human rights has made possible to question the design of collective spaces to make them accessible to all. These struggles for accessible spaces have inspired broader reflections on the need to support the development of inclusive societies. This line of thought can be applied to different disciplines and in particular to spatial planning, which can subtly promote a wide range of practices, from social justice to food security. The presentations that follow present reflections on the design of living spaces that increase the level of well-being of everyone, from childhood to old age, whatever the physical abilities or the living standards of people. 

Developing "Healthy Streets Strategic Plan" during Coivd-19 outbreak: Çankaya case studyView Abstract
Case Study Report 11:00 AM - 01:00 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/09 08:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/09 10:00:00 UTC
In 2015, the UK government created a new Cross-Government Prosperity Fund worth £1.3 billion from 2016-2021, to help promote economic growth in emerging economies. The Programme supports the broad-based and inclusive growth needed to build prosperity and reduce poverty, but also make development overall more sustainable through the strengthening of institutions and improvement of the global business environment. The Global Future Cities Programme (GFCP) Programme aims to carry out targeted interventions to encourage sustainable urban development and increase prosperity. It builds upon three integrated pillars (urban planning, transport and resilience), that will address key barriers to prosperity, in selected 30 cities in 19 countries. Arup is the delivery partner of GFCP Turkey, including 5 interventions in 3 cities and 4 municipalities. Among them, one intervention is directly related with “healthy and wellbeing” concerns. Çankaya Healthy Streets Project aims at enhancing the public participation within the municipality through the “Healthy Streets” approach, which promises a better-quality and sustainable environment in neighbourhoods for the integration of well-being of people in urban environments. Çankaya is the central service-sector district of Ankara, the capital of Turkey. With its 1 million residents and 2 million daily users, it is one of the largest districts of the country. And this project intends to upgrade the district’s public spaces but mainly streets, which will be more accessible and inclusive for vulnerable groups, especially women with children, elderly, disabled and children, who suffer most from the physical obstacles of streets in their daily life. Arup is working as delivery partner to provide the outputs as listed below; • Strategic plan of “healthy streets” for streets rehabilitation and identification of potential areas for implementation within Çankaya district boundaries • An urban design project for one selected pilot area • A manual for pilot area urban design project implementation • Design standards adapted to municipality regulatory framework • Design manual for streets (which will be a handbook ready to be shared to start promoting Çankaya Healthy Streets project in Turkey and abroad) • Increased capacity of CM decision-makers and technical personnel for developing healthy street projects in Çankaya • Increased awareness of citizens and decision makers of the benefits of improving quality of streets. This case study report will focus on the first output, the Healthy Streets Strategic Plan, which coincided with the outbreak of coronavirus disease (Covid-19). The project team had to adapt the strategic plan framework accordingly and defined new domains, like pandemics and recovery, beside the previously defined ones, climate and mobility. The presentation will explain the 4 goals, 12 actions and 36 sub-actions of this Strategic Plan, in relation to newly created domains-framework: Climate, mobility, pandemics and recovery. This will give insight to the new urban concepts concerning health and well-being, following the current pandemic.
Presenters Sertac Erten
Associate, Arup
Co-authors
SR
Stefano Recalcati
Associate Director, Arup
A user-centric approach to the 15-minute city: examining children’s walkability in BolognaView Abstract
Case Study Report 11:00 AM - 01:00 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/09 08:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/09 10:00:00 UTC
According to the World Health Organization (2020), 80% of adolescent children in cities worldwide have insufficient physical activity levels. Studies from the UK and Europe show that children’s walking trips have dropped by a significant margin in recent decades. Active Commuting to and from School (ACS), which is one of the main ways for children to meet their recommended daily physical activity levels, is also in decline (Shaw et al., 2013). These trends correspond to various interrelated socio-economic and environmental factors that involve cultural expectations as well as preparedness of the urban environment to meet children’s needs. One of the most direct and axiomatic factors affecting children’s urban walkability is their proximity to daily services and their ability to reach important destinations on foot. This study employs two theoretical concepts as a basis for service proximity across the urban territory: the usefulness of the urban realm as defined in Jeff Speck’s (2013) General Theory of Walkability and the chrono-centric ‘15-minute city’ concept as proposed by Carlos Moreno et al. (2021). These two concepts are seen as complementary and support cross-validation of the mapping results of the study carried out at city scale. Produced as a result of research in partnership between Systematica Srl, the Bologna Municipality and Fondazione Innovazione Urbana and presented at the 6th edition of the Biennale Spazio Pubblico 2021, this study adopts a user-targeted approach to the 15-minute city that focuses on the mobility of middle-school age children (11-14 years) in the city of Bologna, Italy. The goal of the study is to analyze the distribution of the city’s supply of daily services relevant to children of this age group and the corresponding potential to reach these services on foot. The methodological approach combines advanced analytical modelling using GIS tools with data supported by the Bologna Municipality database system and open-data sources to analyze the proximity of 8 essential service categories, sub-categorized and weighted according to their significance to the target users. The mapping analysis revealed that Bologna performs fairly well in terms of overall proximity of services with most districts covered by at least half of the 8 service categories within a 15-minute walking timeframe. The walkability analysis using Walk Score showed that 77% of the population of Bologna live in areas characterized by a high walkability index. Services targeting the 11-14 age group are also well distributed across the urban area. Only three neighbourhoods were identified as potential areas of intervention. Preliminary analysis of the mapped data also indicates that 90% of schools - a key destination for this age group - are already located in highly walkable areas. Ensuring walkable distances to primary needs is the first step to enhancing adolescent children’s physical activity levels and supporting their right to independent mobility within the city. From a methodological perspective, this practical application aims to shed light on the importance of adopting a user-centric approach when evaluating accessibility in cities using a methodology that can be applied to other social groups and urban contexts. References Moreno, C., Allam, Z., Chabaud, D., Gall, C., Pratlong, F. (2021). Introducing the “15-Minute City”: Sustainability, Resilience and Place Identity in Future Post-Pandemic Cities. Smart Cities 2021, 4, 93–111. Doi: 10.3390/smartcities4010006 Speck, J. (2013). Walkable city: How downtown can save America, one step at a time. New York: Macmillan. Shaw, B., Fagan-Watson, B., Frauendienst, B., Redecker, A., Jones, T., Hillmann, M. (2013). Children’s independent mobility: a comparative study in England and Germany (1971-2010). World Health Organization (2020). Fact Sheet: Physical Activity. WHO. Available at: who.int
Presenters
AG
Andrea Gorrini
Systematica Srl
Co-authors
LA
Lamia Abdelfattah
Systematica Srl
GB
Giulia Boni
Systematica Srl
GC
Giulia Carnevalini
Systematica Srl
RC
Rawad Choubassi
Partner And Managing Director, Systematica Srl
F
Federico Messa
Systematica Srl
DP
Dante Presicce
Systematica Srl
Examining gap between planned service levels and realistic demands of hospitals based on accessibility driven service area demarcation: an empirical study of Dalian, P.R. China and Berlin, GermanyView Abstract
Research Paper 11:00 AM - 01:00 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/09 08:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/09 10:00:00 UTC
The appropriate allocation and service level configuration of hospitals is of great importance in improving the quality of individuals’ life, as well as maintaining social security and social stability. Yet in traditional urban planning projects in China, hospitals are usually roughly configured and laid where the population of certain districts exceeds 1,000, i.e, according to an index of every one thousand persons, or where the residents of nearby communities could reach in 15 minutes by walk, i.e, according to standards of 15-minute life circle. Crude hospital configuration methods as such render potential gap between planned supplies and realistic demands of medical resources. Previous researches addressing such gap often rely on ex ante accessibility analysis such as network analysis via Geographic Information System, often failing to take into considerations realistic factors like traffic congestions, enclosures, and thus not precisely reflecting the actual travel time. To overcome the above defects, this study applies an ex post accessibility method, relying on online map providers to directly acquire real travel time. Firstly, Berlin is chosen as the comparison city for Dalian to draw guidance on hospital distribution due to its high development level and its similarities to Dalian in population and area. Secondly, grid points covering whole urban areas are generated for each city, and the travel time between each grid point and all hospitals are acquired from online map providers. Grid points are then assigned to hospitals with the shortest travel time, and realistic hospital service areas are thus demarcated. Thirdly, population distribution data are overlaid with realistic hospital service areas. Thus, it can be inferred to what amount of residents each hospital is burdened with, and whether this amount is appropriate given with the planned service level of each hospital. Finally, the results of Dalian are compared with Berlin, showing there is more apparent disparity in hospital spatial accessibility, and notable gap between planned service level and realistic demands of hospitals in Dalian. Discussions are later made to provide concrete suggestions for improved hospital allocation and configuration for Dalian. This research contributes to the expanding literature on hospital allocation and configuration in raising a novel method applicable for inference of the actual hospital service areas and service burden.
Presenters
XA
Xiang Ao
SHANGHAI TONGJI URBAN PLANNING&DESIGN INSTITUTE
Co-authors
QL
Qianwen Li
SHANGHAI TONGJI URBAN PLANNING&DESIGN INSTITUTE
Measuring disparities in food access and its implications for nutrient-related diseases: an empirical study in metropolitan AtlantaView Abstract
Research Paper 11:00 AM - 01:00 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/09 08:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/09 10:00:00 UTC
A considerable body of literature has investigated the role of food insecurity in resulting in a wide range of subsequent health implications and disparities in food access is often believed to be closely tied to food insecurity. Using Yelp businesses and USDA SNAP retailer data, this study proposes a multidimensional and spatiotemporal dynamic approach to measuring food access in metropolitan Atlanta from the perspective of Abundance, Diversity, and Healthiness. An inconsistent result has been found by comparing the space-based and place-based measurement, which suggests a non-dichotomous interpretation of urban foodscape. Furthermore, OLS and Spatial regression models are built to investigate the associations between food access and nutrient-related diseases. Mixed results suggest that living in areas with a great diversity of food choices have a strongly protective effect on prevalence rates of high blood pressure, diabetes, and coronary heart diseases, while there is no statistically significant tie between abundance of food and the occurrence of diseases. Findings emphasize the need for a deepened understanding of the components and manifestation of true food access.
Presenters
YZ
Yilun Zha
PhD Candidate, Georgia Institute Of Technology
Livelihood and food security: Planning challenges of poultry farming in Ibadan, NigeriaView Abstract
Research Paper 11:00 AM - 01:00 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/09 08:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/09 10:00:00 UTC
Family poultry farming is undergoing major transformations from being an extensive system to semi-intensive and intensive in many cities in Nigeria. With no specific physical planning guidelines, its rapid intensification has contributed to many household nutrition and is perceived as a cornerstone for livelihood and food security before the pandemic. However, during and after the pandemic, the proliferation of family poultry among households in urban and peri-urban residential areas in Ibadan city have led to several violations and contraventions of residential planning standards. With increasing production costs, there is a risk of creating new environmental and public health threats having pandemic potential which will add to existing food safety hazards and proliferation of antimicrobial resistant pathogens. This paper examined how urban planners while adopting the principles of healthy city concept can evolve environmental safety guidelines for family poultry while promoting the legal inclusion and sustainability of family poultry within residential neighbourhoods. Adopting a multi-stage sampling technique, primary and secondary data were sourced from family poultry households randomly selected using a semi-structured questionnaire from two local government areas (LGA) from one a peri-urban and the other from an urban LGA in the city. Data obtained were analyzed using chi-square and probit regression model. Findings revealed that family poultry only marginally support household’s livelihood owing to high running cost. There exists pollution of soil and water through inappropriate waste management in residential buildings. To reduce further contraventions and promote healthy city, paper suggests that in the post-pandemic city, an inclusive approach that allows for family poultry in urban residential plot designs while protecting the environment is crucial to empower and improve the livelihood of the urban poor in cities. Keywords: Environment, Family Poultry, Livelihood, Planning Standards, Residential areas
Presenters
OO
Olusola Olufemi
Associate, Society For Good Health, Sustainable Development And Environmental Awareness, Nigeria
Co-authors
OO
Oluwafisayo Ogunmodede
Postgraduate Student, University Of Ibadan
AM
Alabi Moruf
Reader, University Of Ibadan
Evidence-based design of perceived pathways in cold regional parks for elderly health behaviorView Abstract
Research Paper 11:00 AM - 01:00 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/09 08:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/09 10:00:00 UTC
The aging situation of China is severe at this stage, and the "14th Five-Year Plan" has recommended that tackling aging should be raised as a national strategy. There is no doubt about the utility of parks to physical and mental health of the elderly, and it is also an important space carrier for elderly health behavior. Among them, paths are the most used space by the elderly, and it is necessary to explore the coupling results of the senior internal requirements and the evaluation of the perceived environment. Studies have proved that proper exercise in winter can also achieve health promotion, but existing research has limited the excavation of cold climate regions. Therefore, this study focused on cold regions, with the elderly as the main body of investigation, and park pathways as the spatial object, in order to explore: 1) healthy behavior patterns on pathways in different times and seasons; 2) perceived environmental characteristics that significantly affect the occurrence of elderly health behaviors; 3) perceived evaluation of elderly people on pathways with different characteristics. Firstly, this research selected Daishan Park, Jinjiang Park, Jinxiu Park and Changchun Park in Changchun, a representative city of cold regions, as the survey samples. We selected representative walking paths in these four parks, and extracted the perceived physical space characteristics, including qualitative and quantitative indicators such as scale, paving, side interface, facilities and landscape, water or event venue accessibility. Then, combined with behavior observation and map labeling, this study used statistics and cluster analysis to compare the number of activities and exercise intensity of different paths, and explored the healthy behavior patterns carried by path spaces. Secondly, it combined regular and repeated interviews with 26 elderly users, and characterized their psychological perception of environmental needs as safety, comfort, convenience, beauty and sense of belonging. Furthermore, we conducted a survey on the importance-satisfaction of perceiving environment in the paths selected above, and explored the spatial characteristics and current issues that significantly influence the healthy behaviors of the elderly. The results show that in winter park pathways, healthy behaviors are dominated by dynamic behaviors for fitness purposes. The factors that have the greatest impact on the development of healthy behaviors are route design and the accessibility of activity venues, and the greatest demand is safety. In non-winter park pedestrian space, there are more static behaviors for recreational purposes. Route design, scale, plants and accessibility are the most influential spatial elements, and the most important requirement is comfort and beauty. In addition, comparing the use of park roads during daytime and nighttime, it is found that the elderly have greater demands for environmental comfort and scenic beauty during daytime, and their biggest needs at night are good lighting conditions and smooth paving. Finally, based on the above discussion and conclusions, we tried to provide targeted and implementable suggestions and measures for the optimization of pathways in similar cold regional parks. This article proposed optimization strategies from the aspects of management, overall and detailed design, that is, to improve the adaptability of resource conversion and maintenance, the rationality of the route design, and the support of detailed design such as scale and landscape. In summary, we provided a new perspective for active aging and space optimization in cold regions.
Presenters
TY
Tianjiao Yan
School Of Architecture,Harbin Institute Of Technology (HIT);Hei Longjiang Cold Region Urban-Rural Human Settlements Science Key Laboratory
Co-authors
HL
Hong Leng
Harbin Institute Of Technology
Is Neighborhood Green Space Associated With a Lower Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in elderly? Evidence From Shanghai, ChinaView Abstract
Research Paper 11:00 AM - 01:00 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/09 08:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/09 10:00:00 UTC
Background: The elderly is the main group of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The incidence rate of T2DM is closely related to physical activity and environment. There are many literatures that have proved that green space has important influence on the health level of patients with T2DM. However, due to spatial non-stationarity, it is difficult for traditional linear regression models to explain the geographic spatial variation of prevalence and related driving factors. Besides, most of the studies focus on large-scale urban green space, and ignore the green space inside residential area which are also closely related to the daily life of the elderly. Purpose: (1) To investigate association between T2DM and neighborhood green space supply. (2) To assess the current status of community green space supply in Yangpu District for finding problems and proposing corresponding measures to build a healthier community in the Post-COVID-19 World. Method:The research subjects were 318,686 people aged 60 years and older living in 306 neighborhood committees (Administrative Divisions in China), Yangpu District, Shanghai, China. Among them 32,609 were diagnosed with T2DM. The prevalence data comes from the district government statistics, and the green space data extracted by the Shanghai Surveying and Mapping Institute are reliable. Through the API of AMAP, the walking path planning function was called to capture the shortest walk time from the neighborhood to the park, as well as the number of parks within 15 minutes of the neighborhood. Then calculate the comprehensive green space accessibility index through factor analysis. Finally, GWR(Geographically Weighted Regression) was performed in ArcGIS to fit associations between medically diagnosed T2DM and green space supply in order to explore the spatial variation of the prevalence and related driving factors. Findings: The average T2DM in the elderly in the study area is 10%, GWR results showed that there was a certain spatial heterogeneity in the prevalence. The ratio of neighborhood committee green space (- 0.19 < Co < -0.41), the ratio of green space in residential area (- 0.04 < Co < -0.24), the comprehensive green space accessibility index (- 0.03 < Co < -0.11) were had a certain negative impact on T2DM. It also showed that the coverage ratio of neighborhood committee green space had a greater impact on the dependent variables among the three green space supply indicators. The green space in residential area was also correlated with the T2DM, which reflected the characteristics of green space being cherished as a limited resource in the high-density residential environment in Shanghai. In this environment, the accessibility of green space also had a certain importance. The bivariate local Moran’s I statistic results revealed that the “high-low” clusters appeared in some communities in the northern and central regions, which means that although these communities had a higher coverage ratio of green space, the green space accessibility was low. This may cause obstacles to the use of the elderly. Conclusions: This study innovatively uses geographically weighted regression, which embeds the spatial position of the data into the regression equation, to detect the spatial change of T2DM and its driving factors. And we speculate that green space has a mediating effect on the health level of the elderly. Finally, for the central urban area of a city with a high-density built environment like Shanghai, increasing large-scale green space is a huge challenge. What is feasible is that we can improve the supply of urban green space and the mediating effect by increasing the small green spaces in and around residential areas and improving the accessibility of green spaces.
Presenters
YZ
Ye Zhan
Student, College Of Architectrue And Urban Planning, Tongji University
Co-authors
YZ
Ying Zhu
College Of Architectrue And Urban Planning, Tongji University
YY
Yifan Yu
Professor, Tongji University
YL
Yining Liu
Shanghai Surveying And Mapping Institute
Toward liveable neighbourhoods: Prioritizing the improvement of neighbourhood amenities through people-oriented planning in WuhanView Abstract
Research Paper 11:00 AM - 01:00 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/09 08:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/09 10:00:00 UTC
The improvement of neigbourhood amenities is one of the key urban renewal issues in old districts. Due to tight deadlines and financial restrictions, the amenities’ improvement in China have been often criticized for the misallocation of resources meeting resident’s demand. Previous studies have investigated how residents’ demand in amenities can be met through urban renewal. However, very few explored how the priorities or sequences of improvement should be identified to more effectively improve neighbourhood satisfaction. Thus, this study adopted Kano-IPA model to investigate the priorities of amenities improvement of urban neighbourhoods in Wuhan, China. Firstly, 5100 questionnaires reflecting the residents’ subjective perception of the usage and satisfaction of amenities were collected. Secondly, the valid data has been analyzed by using different statistical techniques, including descriptive, correlation and regression modelling etc. Lastly, the adaptive strategy of amenities improvement with different considerations, including age, income, districts as well as housing type etc, can be proposed. The preliminary results showed that, for the sequence of amenities’ usage frequency, there is no significant difference among different neighbourhoods. But significant differences were found at the structure and significance level of associations between amenities’ evaluation and neighbourhood satisfaction among different sets of resident group. In regards to this, basic, excitement and performance factors fitting different scenarios have been identified. The research findings can provide references for allocating financial budget and other resource in improving neighbourhood amenities. This case study also illustrate the contextual characteristics of public goods provision in urban China. Future feasibility studies fitting the identified priorities into planning practice and both considering time and public expenditure limitation are expected.
Presenters
QZ
Qi Zhang
Post-doctoral Researcher, Wuhan Land Use And Urban Spatial Planning Research Center
Co-authors
ZZ
Zhenghua Zheng
Wuhan Land Use And Urban Spatial Research Center
JH
Jianzhong Huang
College Of Architecture And Urban Planning, Tongji University
YZ
Ying Zhou
Wuhan Land Use And Urban Spatial Research Center
Localized Spatial Planning Practices of Child-Friendly Cities under the New Urban Agenda: A Case Study of the City of WuhanView Abstract
Research Paper 11:00 AM - 01:00 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/09 08:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/09 10:00:00 UTC
Under the development framework of the "New Urban Agenda", UNICEF provides a unified toolkit for the implementation of the "Child-Friendly City Initiative" in various countries, and provides guidelines for spatial and environmental development of child-friendly cities. In light of the differences in each country and city in the spatial planning and development of (a specific) child-friendly city, localization and translation need to be made to the general framework and basic principles. However, most previous studies on child-friendly urban space focused on the design of public spaces, but few on localized spatial planning of child-friendly cities. Taking Wuhan as a case, the present study attempts to localize the spatial planning strategy and implementation path of child-friendly city under the framework of the "New Urban Agenda". The study first sorts out the overall development framework and spatial objectives of a child-friendly city, and proposes an overall strategic framework guided by top design, supported by "social environment", and carried by "spatial environment". Drawing on practical experiences from various sources, the study identifies the orientation of spatial planning in Wuhan's child-friendly city endeavor, and proposes a three-level spatial planning system of "city - sub-district - community" to build a child-friendly city with Chinese local characteristics. Aiming at the four typical children's activity spaces including community socializing space, public service facilities, urban recreational space, and street activity space, and taking into account the local features of Wuhan, the study further proposes the strategy for spatial improvement and standards for construction in line with local conditions, in an effort to materialize the idea of child-friendly city into specific actions of spatial development. Finally, based on current research findings, the study reviews Wuhan’s approach to building a child-friendly city from a practical perspective, and puts forward suggestions for other cities in similar practices.
Presenters
BF
BANG FU
Urban Planner, Wuhan Land Use And Urban Spatial Planning Research Center
Study on the Planning of Medical Facilities in small towns under the policy of \\View Abstract
Research Paper 11:00 AM - 01:00 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/09 08:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/09 10:00:00 UTC
Medical and health facilities are important parts of urban public facilities. Current research pays little attention to the public policy effect of medical service, and Medical Facility Planning is usually poorly implemented. The problems of insufficient medical and health resources, low quality, unreasonable structure and layout are particularly prominent in small towns in China. “Medical community” refers to hospital and other medical service institutions and organizations in the same region linked together to rebuild a holistic medical organization structure, in order to promote the sharing of medical and health resources, and distribute high-quality medical resources to a grass-roots level. Take Lanxi City , Zhejiang Province as an example, it analyses the impact of "medical community" policy on medical facilities supply, Combined with medical facilities planning, this study puts forward a better path of implementation, in order to rationally allocate medical resources and promote equal access to basic medical and health services.
Presenters
HX
Huiyi Xia
Research Associate, Shanghai Tongji Urban Planning & Design Institute Co. Ltd.
Co-authors
NX
Nankai Xia
Chief Engineer, Shanghai Tongji Urban Planning & Design Institute Co. Ltd.
The impact of built environment characteristics on perceived general safety of city dwellers: A case study in Mianyang (China)View Abstract
Research Paper 11:00 AM - 01:00 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/09 08:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/09 10:00:00 UTC
Problem: Associated with Chinese rapid urbanization, some disordered environment has resulted in residents’ loss of perceived safety, which is harmful no only to citizens’ wellbeing but also for the sustainable development of city (Olusola O, 2020). Background: Although literature have suggested the possible influencing mechanism between built environment and perceived safety, existing research often roughly identify feeling of safety with the concept of fear of crime(Jansson M, 2013; Jiang B, 2018; Mouratidis K, 2019). Some scholars has already emphasized that the feeling of safety is supposed to reflect general anxiety or unease with broader perceptions of social and physical environment, rather than the narrow dimension of crime-related fear.(Theo L, 2012; Jaewoong W, 2016). Especially in the context of Chinese urban community, where the violent crime rate is relative low, higher perceived safety from crime is not equivalent to favorable evaluation for perceived general safety, thus the crime-oriented interpretation of subjective safety may possibly bias the research. Methods: This paper aims to deeply analyze the specific influence effect of built environment variables on general and specific-multidimensional feeling of safety. Through comprehensive literature review, the particular concept of feeling of safety is redefined in Chinese urban residential areas, including five dimensions as communication safety (subjective safety feeling of the interpersonal contact with strangers within community), activity safety, traffic safety, public security as well as privacy safety. Possible environment impact factors are selected, which involve seven categories and comprise 24 detailed environment elements. Paper-based questionnaires were distributed in the selected areas to collect data, and structural equation model was applied to introduce "latent variables" to effectively quantify the abstract value of feeling of safety. With demographic date as control variables, six quantified models were established where environmental factors act as exogenous variables, and five dimensional as well as general perceived safety serve as endogenous variable respectively. Principal results: Results revealed that except from service facility factor, variables of roads, buildings, green space, environment quality, negative space and defense system all have significant influence on residents’ feeling of safety with varying degrees. Although the notion of perceived safety is expanded, the elements of environment quality, negative space and defense system, which are highly correlated with CPTED theory, still have the most significant impact effect. Furthermore, models showed that built environment factors had different influence effects on multidimensional safety, for example, that the feeling of activity safety is explained most significantly by environment quality while the perception of green space is the important predictor for the feeling of communication safety. Finally, quantitative model analysis and related empirical theory were combined to propose effective environmental optimization strategies, through which policy planners could improve people’s feeling of safety and adjust inhabitants’ mental health level, and provide urban settlers with improved life quality.
Presenters
EZ
Erli Zeng
Assistant Teacher, A). Southwest University Of Science And Technology B) .Harbin Institute Of Technology C).Key Laboratory Of Cold Region Urban And Rural Human Settlement Environment Science And Technology, China
Co-authors
YD
Yu DONG
Harbin Institute Of Technology/ Key Laboratory Of Cold Region Urban And Rural Human Settlement Environment Science And Technology,Ministry Of Industry And Information Technology.
FL
Fengjing LI
Harbin Institute Of Technology/Institute For China Sustainable Urbanization, Tsinghua University, China /Key Laboratory Of Cold Region Urban And Rural Human Settlement Environment Science And Technology, Ministry Of Industry And Information Technology
LC
Lu CHE
Assistant Teacher, Southwest University Of Science And Technology
Do parents’ and children’s perceptions of community environment affect children’s physical activity levels?View Abstract
Research Paper 11:00 AM - 01:00 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/09 08:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/09 10:00:00 UTC
In the context of increasing rates of overweight and obesity among children worldwide, insufficient physical activity may serve as a non-negligible behavioral factor which decreases physical fitness level for Chinese children. Many recent studies have shown that parents’ and children’s perception of community environment would affect children’s physical activity level. This study took children as the research object, and questionnaire survey was conducted on children aged 9-12 and their parents in the selected studying area. A total of 14 categories of parents’ environmental perception factors and 6 categories of children’s environmental perception factors were obtained. And children’s physical activity level was obtained based on the improved CLASS-C questionnaire. Then, linear regression analysis and structural equation model path analysis was applied to explore the impact of community environment perception on children’s physical activity level. The results reveal that the overall impact of parents’ and children’s environmental perception on children's physical activity level were approximately equal, while different influence effects exist when it comes to specific perception factors. The impact degree of the four main categories of community parental perceptual characteristics were ranked as activity venues and facilities, safety, community satisfaction and atmosphere, and landscape environment. Parents' perception of numbers of sports venues and facilities, numbers of game venues and facilities, patency of walking, traffic safety, community attachment and affection for community, all these factors have significant impact on children’s physical activity level. Children's perception of numbers of game venues and facilities, numbers of interesting things, community attachment, numbers of natural scenery, and safety all have significant impact on their own physical activity level. In general, sports or game venues and facilities of communities perceived by parents and children are the most influential factors impacting children's physical activity level. The research results are of great significance for establishing a child-friendly community environment, promoting the improvement for physical activity level and healthy development of children.
Presenters
FL
Fengjing LI
Harbin Institute Of Technology/Institute For China Sustainable Urbanization, Tsinghua University, China /Key Laboratory Of Cold Region Urban And Rural Human Settlement Environment Science And Technology, Ministry Of Industry And Information Technology
Co-authors
YD
Yu DONG
Harbin Institute Of Technology/ Key Laboratory Of Cold Region Urban And Rural Human Settlement Environment Science And Technology,Ministry Of Industry And Information Technology.
WD
Wei DONG
Harbin Institute Of Technology/ Key Laboratory Of Cold Region Urban And Rural Human Settlement Environment Science And Technology,Ministry Of Industry And Information Technology.
EZ
Erli Zeng
Assistant Teacher, A). Southwest University Of Science And Technology B) .Harbin Institute Of Technology C).Key Laboratory Of Cold Region Urban And Rural Human Settlement Environment Science And Technology, China
Systematica srl
Associate
,
Arup
SHANGHAI TONGJI URBAN PLANNING&DESIGN INSTITUTE
PhD Candidate
,
Georgia Institute of Technology
Associate
,
Society for Good Health, Sustainable Development and Environmental Awareness, Nigeria
+ 7 more speakers. View All
ISOCARP - Technical Administrator
Assoc. Prof Laura Verdelli
Lecturer
,
University of Tours, France
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