Track 3: Smartness and development. Al-Souq: innovating for performance and management Virtual Room 3
Nov 09, 2021 11:00 AM - 01:00 PM(Asia/Qatar)
20211109T1100 20211109T1300 Asia/Qatar Virtual Only | Track 3 | Session 3. Development influences - Part 1: Economics, free market & urban planning

Case studies of local and global influences that contribute toward economic growth, sustainability and vitality of urban and rural environments.

Virtual Room 3 57th ISOCARP World Planning Congress in Doha, Qatar ajuurinen@xtalks.com

Case studies of local and global influences that contribute toward economic growth, sustainability and vitality of urban and rural environments.

Drivers of Land Use Conflicts in Mega Project Infrastructure in Coastal Areas: A Case Study of Patimban Seaport, IndonesiaView Abstract
Research Paper 11:00 AM - 01:00 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/09 08:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/09 10:00:00 UTC
Coastal areas are particularly sensitive because they are complex, and related land use conflicts are more intense than in non-coastal areas. In addition to representing a unique encounter of natural and socio-economic factors, coastal areas have become paradigms of progressive urbanisation and economic development. Our study of the mega project infrastructure of Patimban Seaport in Indonesia explores the factors driving land use changes and the subsequent land use conflicts emerging from large-scale land transformation in the course of seaport development and mega project governance. We utilised interviews and questionnaires to investigate institutional aspects and conflict drivers. Specifically, we retrace and investigate the mechanisms guiding how mega project governance, land use planning, and actual land use interact. Therefore, we observe and analyse where land use conflicts emerge and the roles that a lack of stakeholder interest involvement and tenure-responsive planning take in this process. Our findings reflect how mismanagement and inadequate planning processes lead to market failure, land abandonment and dereliction and how they overburden local communities with the costs of mega projects. Enforcing a stronger coherence between land use planning, participation and land tenure within the land governance process in coastal land use development at all levels and raising the capacity of stakeholders to interfere with governance and planning processes will reduce conflicts and lead to sustainable coastal development in Indonesia.
Presenters
RS
Roni Susman
Researcher, Leibniz Centre For Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF)
Co-authors
AG
Annelie Maja Guette
Researcher, Leibniz Centre For Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF)
Thomas Weith
Head Of Working Group, Leibniz Centre For Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF)
Geospatial data homogenization and processing for integrated assessment of urban and natural resources and risks: A pilot case for Lazio Region (Italy)View Abstract
Case Study Report 11:00 AM - 01:00 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/09 08:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/09 10:00:00 UTC
In Italian legislation, the landscape is at the center of the strategic planning of land use and risk assessment, orienting the decision and the territorial policy making in the matter of environmental sustainability; management of natural risks; protection and enhancement of the cultural heritage; organisation of socio-economic activities; land use and consumption; management of urban sprawl and infrastructure networks; environmental and urban regeneration activities. Monitoring and evaluating the factors of risk and degradation of the landscape thus becomes fundamental in the adoption of territorial governance on different levels of geographical and administrative scale. The evolution of geospatial technologies and the increasing availability of open data open up new scenarios of geographic analysis for resource management environmental and cultural landscape. The theoretical substratum that supports this work is represented by normative references and programmatic guidelines provided by the European Landscape Convention (2000), the Italian Code of Cultural Heritage and Landscape underlining the functional centrality of the landscape and of the environmental and cultural resources within the strategic planning of the territory. In this perspective, the landscape constraint is understood as a tool to guide land use transformation through practical actions aimed at the enhancement of ecosystem services that include: soil maintenance, reducing the risks of hydrogeological stability, the costs of environmental degradation, educational activities, social reception, energy production and a multiplicity of induced entrepreneurship. GIS data and tools have long supported the drafting of government plans and territorial management - including Regional Landscape Plans, Regional Spatial Landscape Plans, Hydrogeological Planning and General Regulatory Plans municipal level - through the digitization of the territorial information heritage. It is in this context that the databases are created relating to the composition of landscape constraints, environmental and cultural assets (including punctual and linear), infrastructure networks, areas at risk. At the administrative level, the use of GIS technologies is limited to the phase of reconnaissance and mapping of the protected elements (ranges, linear, punctual). The technical standards for the implementation of land use planning plans in fact provide for the production of plan maps, as a support tool for geospatial knowledge and planning. The sectionalization and division of administrative competences in the field of spatial planning, however, implies technical and structural differences in the drafting and adoption of plans. Differences that are also reflected in the production, technical structure and availability of related geospatial data through institutional web GIS platforms (such as, for example, regional portals). These problems are, therefore, an obstacle to the unambiguous and integrated mapping of the different spatial planning plans adopted on different levels of administrative scale. The aim of this work is therefore the development of a tool to support strategic decisions (DSS) on a web-based GIS for an integrated and dynamic reading of the different spatial planning plans through a procedure of homogenisation and standardisation of the available geospatial information. Homogenisation means a data-processing procedure designed to combine differently structured information within unique and descriptive layers of information on the essential characteristics of natural, agro-forestry and historical elements and systems-settlements that connote the landscape and territorial structures. The Region Lazio is here presented as a pilot case study for the implementation of tool prototype.
Presenters Andrea Spasiano
Water Resources Research And Documentation Center - University For Foreigners Of Perugia
Co-authors Fernando Nardi
Director, WARREDOC, Università Per Stranieri Di Perugia
How urban renewal in megacity influences jobs-housing spatial relationship in industrial park: a case study of Caohejing Development ZoneView Abstract
Research Paper 11:00 AM - 01:00 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/09 08:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/09 10:00:00 UTC
Taking Shanghai Caohejing Development Zone as a case study, this paper explores the influencing factors of jobs-housing spatial relationship in industrial park in megacity under the background of urban renewal, in order to provide some policy suggestions for planning response. Firstly, the distribution of the employees' residence places is measured by using mobile phone signaling data, as well as the evolution of jobs-housing spatial relationship. Secondly, commuting time is calculated via Internet map API. Comparing with the surrounding housing supply, bivariate local spatial autocorrelation is used to verify influence of urban renewal on the evolution of jobs-housing spatial relationship. It is found that the influence of urban renewal is formed by the combined effects of employment opportunities, housing opportunities and commuting time costs. The industrial transformation in industrial park has created a large number of employment opportunities and brought a large-scale replacement of employees. If urban renewal fails to provide new housing opportunities in nearby area at the same time, and rail transit expands the space area corresponding to acceptable commuting time cost, the jobs-housing spatial relationship will change drastically. An "enclave" form of "long-distance rail transit matching" comes into being. Finally, two planning suggestions are proposed for the urban renewal of industrial park. First, it is necessary to provide simultaneous new housing opportunities in industrial park and its surrounding areas during the urban renewal. Second, it is necessary to pay attention to the role of rail transit. Multiple lines of rail transit can relieve the change of jobs-housing spatial relationship.
Presenters
SL
Shijia Lin
Tongji University
A Multi-dimensional Analysis of Booming E-commerce (Online Shops) in Urban Villages: Case study in TongcunView Abstract
Case Study Report 11:00 AM - 01:00 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/09 08:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/09 10:00:00 UTC
In the past decade, E-commerce has thrived with the popularization of the Internet and it has gradually changed people’s daily life. Driven by the low entrance standard and flexible working locations of ‘Taobao’ (a C2C E-commerce company like eBay), e-commerce brings to life a range of burgeoning startup SMEs (Small and medium enterprises) in urban villages where business cost is low and transportation is convenient. Such phenomenon is labelled as "Taobao Village" which has long been regarded as a heated topic among urban planners, who attempt to explain the triumphant development of such unique business ecosystem. Nevertheless, most of them heavily focus on the physical space while failing to consider the impacts from social network, providing only a partial picture of "Taobao Village" upsurges. Therefore, taking Tongcun village in Guangzhou as an example, this paper tries to comprehensively analyze the mechanism of overwhelming developments in the village through on-the-spot investigation and in-depth interviews. Herein, a traditional method, SWOT analysis has been employed to explain this special business ecosystem. The results show that the social network of migrants, micro-agglomerate economy and mixed-use space are the three main reasons for supporting the flourishing E-commerce in Tongcun. Whereas, the passive cooperation from the local residents and the limits of clothing industry are regarded as the hindrances of future development. To conclude, this energetic business ecosystem can provide us some precious experience when the authorities build an economically-sound and spontaneously-formed system within the E-commerce industry. In addition, these self-developing business ecosystems should also be protected as they give some possible future of urban villages, which is known as a “poor” and “undeveloped” area.
Presenters
HS
Haochen SHI
Department Of Urban Planning, School Of Architecture, South China University Of Technology
Co-authors
XC
Xiaoxuan Cen
South China University Of Technology
YL
Yanjun Lai
South China University Of Technology
Evaluating A City’s Regional Competitiveness Through An Airport’s Angle The Yangtze River Delta Cities CaseView Abstract
Research Paper 11:00 AM - 01:00 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/09 08:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/09 10:00:00 UTC
The Air Transport industry is one of the key industries in the world, it created 65.5 million jobs directly or indirectly, generated $ 2.7 trillion in revenue, and took 3.6% of the world’s GDP in 2017 (ATAG). The major airports have become key nodes in global production and enterprise systems offering them speed, agility, and connectivity. They are also powerful engines of local economic development, attracting aviation-linked businesses and multinational companies of all types to their environs (Aerotropolis, n.d.). This paper evaluates the competitiveness of the 27 major cities in the Yangtze River Delta (henceforth referred to as YRD) region under the influence of airports (Hu & Deng, 2019). YRD is one of the most developed regions in China with an intensive airport network. There are 16 airports in total including 9 international airports. GARI is an index to evaluate an airport’s impacts on the city’s competitiveness ( Sun & Ma,2020). According to GARI, there are five dimensions in which airports can impact cities’ competitiveness, including airport operation scale, accessibility & connectivity, economic and industrial competitiveness, human and social living standards, external-oriented economic base. The dimensions can be elucidated as the following: 1) Airport operation scale. The concept covers the passenger and cargo flow, amount of flight routes, the rating of airports, and other elements. 2) Accessibility & Connectivity. The airport’s accessibility to the downtown area and connectivity to other cities builds city efficiency. Superior accessibility & connectivity reduce time cost, positively impact the cooperation efficiency of enterprises and regions. 3) Economic and Industrial Competitiveness. Airport attracts aviation-linked businesses, time-sensitive manufactures, multinational companies which are high-value-added and enable to gather high-level talents, benefits the GDP and employment. 4) Human and Social Living Standards. Airports boost international communication and cooperation, these activities ask for an international-standard commercial and built environment. 5) External-Oriented Economic Base. An international airport contributes to the city's external-oriented economic base and improves the attractiveness for Integrated Free Trade Zone development and Foreign Direct Investment (FDI). Base on the collected data in 2019, the lessons learned from the YRD case are as follows: 1) The 27 YRD cities are generally balanced developed while still fallen into three tiers: Shanghai becomes the only Tier One city, which performances the best in all dimensions. Tier Two cities are Hangzhou, Nanjing, Ningbo, Wuxi, and Suzhou. They perform variously in industrial and economic competitiveness, and relatively weak in terms of human and social living standards, and the external-oriented economic base. The rest of the YRD cities constitute Tier Three. These cities develop relatively slower, especially in the accessibility and connectivity, economic and industrial competitiveness. 2) Cities with larger airports are with stronger city competitiveness, while some are relatively weak in the dimension of human and Social Living Standards; cities with smaller airports are relatively less competitive in all five dimensions mentioned above; cities without their own airports but nearby major airports can also improve the city competitiveness by benefiting from the positive impacts of the nearby airports.
Presenters
TS
TIANYAO SUN
PhD Student, South China University Of Technology
Co-authors
MH
Miao Han
Aerotropolis Institute China
RA
Rong Ai
AIC
SY
Sen Yang
AIC
ZL
Ziqian Liu
AIC
The Sustainable-based Impacts of Built Environmental Influencing Factors on Price-rent Ratio: A Case Study in Guangzhou View Abstract
Research Paper 11:00 AM - 01:00 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/09 08:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/09 10:00:00 UTC
As an influential sector in the national economy, real estate and the urban economy play an essential role in sustainable economic growth. Sustainable development of a healthy real estate market contributes to improve citizens' quality of life and achieve sustainable urban management. Representing the coupling relationship between housing price and rent, the price-rent ratio is an indicator of the real estate market. The housing price-rent ratio and urban sustainable development are mutually reinforcing. A reasonable housing price-rent ratio will promote the sustainability of the real estate market, thereby promoting the sustainable development of the city; in turn, sustainable urban construction will also promote the rationalization of the housing price-rent ratio, which will have a positive impact on the real estate market. The impact is particularly reflected in the construction of urban infrastructure. Therefore, exploring and comparing factors influencing the price-rent ratio are important for urban sustainability. Regarding the housing price-rent ratio, a myriad of papers has focused on the macro-factors of society or the economy that influence the price-rent ratio. However, there are few studies focus on investigating the micro-level factors of the built environment that influence the price-rent ratio. Some studies have been conducted to uncover the built environment factors that affect the housing price or housing rent separately. But the impacts of the built environment on price-rent ratio have not been studied fully. Such kind of vacancy needs to be filled. However, operating this kind of study could be difficult. Firstly, without a series of housing prices and housing rent records, as well as urban infrastructure data, the analysis could be very hard and unreliable. Secondly, proper a suitable model to describe the relationship between urban infrastructure factors and price-rent ratio, then extract the most influential factors, is hard to design. Many aspects should be put into consideration like multicollinearity of factors and the reliability of the model. Finally, the analysis should be operated from various aspects and find out how urban sustainable construction influences the housing price-rent ratio. Utilizing house transaction data and rent data in 2018 in Guangzhou, this paper gives an analysis of the spatial patterns and influencing factors of housing price-rent ratio in Guangzhou. Firstly, this paper utilized the housing purchase data and housing rental data in November 2018 in Guangzhou, and combined Inverse distance weighted (IDW) interpolation methods to estimate the price-rent ratio. Secondly, the paper employed the quantile regression model to quantify the impacts of built environmental factors on price-rent ratio. Finally, this paper discussed the spatial distribution pattern of price-rent ratio and the influencing mechanisms of urban sustainability construction and price-rent ratio. Moreover, this paper further discussed the bidirectional influence mechanism of urban sustainability construction and housing price-price ratio. Results showed that the price-rent ratio has a dispersed distribution with multiple centers. The highs lie in the suburbs or handed-over areas between newly-built and old built-up parts of the city. The price-rent ratio is mainly influenced by fife services such as leisure and entertainment, shopping centers, sports facility, education resources such as university and school, green infrastructures such as green space and waterfront. Daily Life services contribute more to low-level price-rent ratio and leisure, entertainment and cultural facility contributes more to high-level price- rent ratio. This study will lay a solid foundation for formulating real estates policies within the built environment and helps integrating real estate markets into sustainable urban development activities to achieve urban sustainability.
Presenters
WL
Wenjing Li
Master Student, School Of Architecture, South China University Of Technology
Co-authors
DX
Dawei Xiao
Professor, South China University Of Technology
Shifting Paradigm: Public Private Partnership (PPP) as an Infrastructure Financing Alternative for New Capital City Development in IndonesiaView Abstract
Case Study Report 11:00 AM - 01:00 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/09 08:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/09 10:00:00 UTC
The COVID-19 pandemic has caused direct impacts on global economics, and Indonesia is no exception. Based on World Bank data, the GDP growth of Indonesia has declined from +5.02% in 2019 to -2.07% in 2020. On the contrary, Reuters reported that the GDP growth of Indonesia is +7.07% in the second quarter of 2021. This situation could be taken as the best momentum to push economic recovery, and further will attain economic transformation to get out of the middle-income trap as part of achieving Indonesia’s big vision in 2045. One of the Government of Indonesia (GoI) efforts to push economic recovery is through the development of the New Capital City in East Kalimantan despite the pandemic in order to boost investment. New Capital City development project as an opportunity to encourage investment climate and economic growth as it is projected to give multiplier effect due to pandemic, for instance, attracting more investors, increasing mobility and labour opportunities, especially in the construction sector, as well as boosting the aggregate demand and the supply of the economy. Infrastructure performance is vital to economic development, and it is critical to enable labour mobility and stimulate economic activities. Nevertheless, Indonesia is financially insufficient with limited public funds. According to Ministry of National Development Planning estimation, GoI is only capable of fulfilling 19,4% from the total of IDR 519 Trillion infrastructure funding need until 2024, whereas the funding gap of 80,6% can be accomplished through alternative financing schemes, one of which is Public-Private Partnership (PPP) scheme. PPP involves a collaboration between the public and private sectors to raise capital funding by reducing the government budget and improving the inclusivity projects. PPP scheme exploration is a way to enhance the country’s competitiveness in terms of infrastructure facilitation and promote its business and industry related to infrastructure development. The PPP scheme will be used in the first stage (2020-2024) of New Capital City infrastructure development, namely housing, government office, roads and bridges, and other supporting infrastructures. Based on the Ministry of National Development Planning prediction, the impact of New Capital City development can accelerate economic growth through eight economic clusters, such as future education, sustainable manufacturing, smart city and center of digital technology, pharmaceutical, agri-based clusters, ecotourism, and health, advanced pharmaceutical, and sustainable coal, that will develop regional economic by four to five times to approximately USD180 Billion. In addition, the New Capital City development is estimated to create around 4.3 to 4.8 Million job opportunities in East Kalimantan in 2024. By using a literature review on the concept of PPP and The New Capital City development plan, this study will elaborate the potential of PPP implementation in Indonesia’s New Capital City development as a new paradigm in sustainable infrastructure financing relating to economic recovery from the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. Key words: Infrastructure Development, New Capital City, Public-Private Partnership, Sustainable Financing.
Presenters
DH
Dwi Putri Heritasari
Planning Expert, Ministry Of Public Works And Housing, Republic Of Indonesia
AD
Amira Dhiandini
Planning Expert, Ministry Of Public Works And Housing, Republic Of Indonesia
KU
Khairatul Ummah
Planning Expert, Ministry Of Public Works And Housing, Republic Of Indonesia
MA
Muhammad Idham Alwi
Planning Expert, Ministry Of Public Works And Housing, Republic Of Indonesia
“Who on earth allowed that to be built”: Exploring decision making processes leading to poor quality buildings.View Abstract
Research Paper 11:00 AM - 01:00 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/09 08:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/09 10:00:00 UTC
In England, most new developments in the urban built environment result from a process of a local municipality approving/refusing individual developer proposals. This process has a crucial role in shaping the quality of the urban built environment and the subsequent impacts on people’s health and wellbeing. As it currently operates, the English planning system is a negotiated system wherein the nature of site-specific development outcomes are negotiated between the planners representing the Local Authority and the developers who put forward a proposal. Such negotiations take place within the parameters set by national and local legislation, with inputs from ‘public consultation’ with a variety of ‘statutory consultees’ and ‘non-statutory consultees’ depending on the proposal. In terms of policy input, the quality of the built environment in England as it results from the planning system has received renewed attention in the recent past; both from reports highlighting that the quality of housing in England has barely improved in ten years (Place Alliance, 2020) and government commissions such as the Building Better Building Beautiful Commission (2020). The work of the latter is directly influencing the government’s proposals for a revised planning system; proposals that promise greater attention to design quality whilst simultaneously threatening to reduce the possibilities for citizen engagement. Addressing the consultation aspect, citizen engagement in planning outcomes has been explored through a range of literature. Gulino et al (2019) for instance, studying the Peckam Coal Line project argue that there are four types of engagement between the community and state: state regulation and community implementation; cooperation; community autonomy; and community opposition. Johnston and Blenkinsopp (2017) studying local enterprise partnerships on the other hand argue that the distinctiveness of civic society is itself threatened by civic engagement. In our research we explore the nature of the space occupied by Civic Societies in England, especially with respect to safeguarding design quality through their involvement in consultation processes. Civic Societies are voluntary groups who represent local communities, most often in processes that shape the local built environment. In England the civic society movement is aggregated into a larger umbrella organisation – Civic Voice. This research studies the planning approval process around individual new buildings that are judged to be of poor quality. Case study selection is done using the Civic Voice website as a starting point. The research is currently at this stage. Ten Civic Societies will be chosen based upon a) geographical spread; b) range of relative deprivation and c) consent of Local Authority in participating in the research. Particular buildings deemed to be poor quality will be selected through dialogue with the chosen Civic Societies. The research will thereafter employ multiple qualitative methods, encompassing planning application analysis, virtual ‘walking’ focus group discussions and interviews with planning officers. The research is due to be completed and written up by the end of July. It is funded by the Reading Real Estate Foundation and the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Programme of the University of Reading. References Building Better Building Beautiful Commission (2020) Living with Beauty: The report of the Building Better, Building Beautiful Commission – January 2020. London: Building Better Building Beautiful Commission Gullino, S., Seetzen, H., Pacchi, C. & Cerulli, C. 2019, "Interpreting Patterns of Interaction between Civic Activism and Government Agency in Civic Crowdfunding Campaigns", Built environment (London. 1978), vol. 45, no. 2, pp. 248-267. Johnston, L. & Blenkinsopp, J. 2017, "Challenges for civil society involvement in civic entrepreneurship: a case study of local enterprise partnerships", Public money & management, vol. 37, no. 2, pp. 89-96. Place Alliance (2020) A Housing Design Audit for England. London: Place Alliance.
Presenters
AC
Angelique Chettiparamb
Professor Of Urban Planning And Governance, University Of Reading
Co-authors
CM
Christopher Maidment
Lecturer In Planning , Henley Business School, University Of Reading
KP
Kieran Plamer
Student, University Of Reading
RT
Rachel Tregidgo
Research Assistant, University Of Reading
Research on Sustainable Development Evaluation and Spatial Distribution Characteristics of Resource-based Cities in Heilongjiang ProvinceView Abstract
Research Paper 11:00 AM - 01:00 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/09 08:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/09 10:00:00 UTC
As a representative of the old industrial base in Northeast China, the resource-based cities in Heilongjiang Province provided a large number of materials, funds and talents for the final completion of industrialization. However, with the continuous consumption of resources, resource-based cities urgently need transformation and sustainable development. This paper constructs a sustainable development evaluation system based on the factor analysis method. Then takes 11 resource-based cities in Heilongjiang Province as the research object. The spatial autocorrelation, standard deviation ellipse and related methods are applied to analyze resource-based cities' development characteristics from 2005-2018. Finally, the spatial distribution characteristics of cities are obtained. The results are as follows: (1) There are two kinds of resource-based cities: five mature-type and six declining-type respectively. (2) Yichun, Hegang, Qitaihe and Shuangyashan cities are highly dependent on resource reserves and it is difficult to get rid of resource exhaustion. (3) Resource-based cities in Heilongjiang Province are concentrated in the northeast, and the center of sustainable development gradually migrates to the southwest.
Presenters
CD
Chao Dai
School Of Architecture, Harbin Institute Of Technology;Key Laboratory Of Cold Region Urban And Rural Human Settlement Environment Science And Technology , Ministry Of Industry And Information Technology;
Co-authors
SX
Suning Xu
School Of Architecture,Harbin Institute Of Technology,Key Laboratory Of Cold Region Urban And Rural Human Settlement Environment Science And Technology,Ministry Of Industry And Information Technology
XW
Xiaochen Wu
, School Of Architecture, Harbin Institute Of Technology, Key Laboratory Of Cold Region Urban And Rural Human Settlement Environment Science And Technology, Ministry Of Industry And Information Technology,
70 years of rise and fall: Exploration of the transformation of Chinese workers' villagesView Abstract
Case Study Report 11:00 AM - 01:00 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/09 08:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/09 10:00:00 UTC
Worker's village is a regular determinant community composed of 4-6-storey brick and concrete houses, which appeared on the edge of urban areas or near outer suburbs during the rapid development of industrialization in China from 1950s to 1990s. Most of the residents who lived here witnessed the prosperity and vitality of the vigorous development of China during the industrialization period. With the development of industrial transformation, urban expansion and new real estate, workers' village has gradually become a village in the city and a shantytown as the basic living unit. The aging of buildings, the change of population structure and the change of residents' needs supporting facilities, open space and living quality need to be improved. Traditional workers' villages can no longer meet the daily needs of the people. In the new era, Chinese cities have also developed from extension to connotation, and cities are also gradually changing to stock development. The improvement of living environment quality of workers' villages has become a major problem and challenge for urban renewal. How to solve the problem of daily life such as workers and migrant population living in this area is an important work to alleviate the anxiety of the people's housing in China. Based on the reconstruction cases of workers' new villages in representative cities such as Shanghai, Gejiu and Chengdu, this paper analyzes and explores the way to improve the quality and revitalize the workers' villages from different groups, different levels and different renewal paths.
Presenters
XZ
Xiaoling ZHU
SHANGHAI , Shanghai Tongji Urban Planning & Design Institute Co. Ltd.
Co-authors
XX
Xiaosong Xu
Honghe Autonomous City,Yunnan Province, Honghe Housing And Urban-Rural Development Authority
YY
Yuyong You
Shanghai, SHANGHAI TONGJI URBAN PLANNING & DESIGN INSTITUTE CO.LTD
Spatial Plan Research based on a new generation of suburban logistics industry in ChinaView Abstract
Research Paper 11:00 AM - 01:00 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/09 08:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/09 10:00:00 UTC
Under the background of the new Internet economy, the service objects and organizational models of the logistics network that are undergoing significant changes, the new logistics has become an important link connecting the real economy and the virtual economy. Making full use of the suburban space to develop a new generation of logistics industry carriers is an important means for cities to build core competitiveness and promote high-quality development. At the same time, when consumption is the main driving force for China’s economic growth, the fast-growing e-commerce market has brought significant benefits and eagerly released the demands for modern logistics to the whole society. In order to cope with multi-party competition and achieve service diversification and opportunity diversification, the suburbs of the city have begun to strive to build a new generation of logistics industrial parks. Consequently, this paper takes the representative logistics industrial park into suburbs of China—Baisi Logistics Group as an example, analysis the core issues of its intrinsic value, industry trend, constraint factors and construction mode. So as to study and discuss the spatial planning form and new development direction of suburban logistics industry in China in the new era. Overall a new construction model with multi-dimensional integration as the core and a highly complex and flexible organization industrial organisation model are proposed with the intention of seeking new breakthrough points and new growth poles to further promote the development of urban-rural integration.
Presenters Chengxin Yao
( Anhui Rural Revitalization Research Institute)School Of Architecture And Planning, Anhui Jianzhu University
Co-authors
XQ
Xueran Qin
Director Of Urban And Rural Planning Institute, Anhui Shangyuan GuiHua Consulting Co.,Itd.
GZ
Guangzhi Zuo
Executive Vice-President Of Anhui Rural Revitalization Research Institute, ( Anhui Rural Revitalization Research Institute)School Of Architecture And Planning, Anhui Jianzhu University
( Anhui Rural Revitalization Research Institute)School of architecture and planning, Anhui Jianzhu University
Tongji University
Department of Urban Planning, School of Architecture, South China University of Technology
PhD student
,
South China University of Technology
master student
,
School of Architecture, South China University of Technology
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