Track 4: Resilience and adaptability. Al-Waha: promoting glocal solutions Fayruz 1
Nov 11, 2021 02:00 PM - 03:30 PM(Asia/Qatar)
20211111T1400 20211111T1530 Asia/Qatar Hybrid | Track 4 | Session 6. Glocal resilient solutions

The presentations cover creative and innovative ideas for urban resilience. Tools to measure impacts, eco-strategies, zero-carbon policies, are designing new solutions to respond to the urgent necessity to mitigate and adapt. New theoretical frameworks and leading innovative research emerge among green policies promoted within different urban environments to face the threats of climate change.  

Spatial Planning, changing paradigms on zero carbon emissions, implementing innovative, smart, regenerative ecosystems and nature-based solutions depend on new governance structures. The necessity of combining expertise in co-creation processes are crucial to achieve successful results. In this sessions authors share new approaches and new strategies that cover a wide range of research to enhance the resilience of the urban environment. 

NOTE: Speakers marked in * will participate in this hybrid session as a virtual attendee.

Fayruz 1 57th ISOCARP World Planning Congress in Doha, Qatar ajuurinen@xtalks.com

The presentations cover creative and innovative ideas for urban resilience. Tools to measure impacts, eco-strategies, zero-carbon policies, are designing new solutions to respond to the urgent necessity to mitigate and adapt. New theoretical frameworks and leading innovative research emerge among green policies promoted within different urban environments to face the threats of climate change.  

Spatial Planning, changing paradigms on zero carbon emissions, implementing innovative, smart, regenerative ecosystems and nature-based solutions depend on new governance structures. The necessity of combining expertise in co-creation processes are crucial to achieve successful results. In this sessions authors share new approaches and new strategies that cover a wide range of research to enhance the resilience of the urban environment. 

NOTE: Speakers marked in * will participate in this hybrid session as a virtual attendee.

Greencoin. Place-based app to empower active societies to shape resilient citiesView Abstract
Research Paper 02:00 PM - 03:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/11 11:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/11 12:30:00 UTC
Among of all the challenges that cities face, the most crucial one is the need to shape the ability to create well-being of urban communities, what becomes urgent as a result of the compound effect generated by climate change – distinguished between direct impacts, indirect effects and pre-existing vulnerability (Silva, Kernaghan & Luque, 2012). To mitigate climate changes, cities today need to find a way to encourage residents to be actively involved in the process of shaping urban resilience. Therefore, there is an urgent need to define ways to enhance eco living choices. In the age of digitalization, smart cities should benefit from IoT and tools allowing the response to the negative consequences of climate changes. One of the possible solutions is the greencoin app designed as a part of digital twin approach. By designing the app we introduce a new eco currency which aims to engage citizens to act and to empower their eco activities by shaping climate awareness. The designing process is embedded in an interdisciplinary framework including economy, sociology, spatial planning, IT, data science, UX, etc. to define most suitable and applicable solutions from which the city can benefit. The progress of work includes elements of defining functionality, technical solutions, social inclusiveness and impact. As the greencoin app together with green currency is designed in an interdisciplinary environment, we focus on how, by using the new type of currency and gamification, we can encourage citizens to get involved in the process shaping urban resilience. There are many applications tested or implemented worldwide, which has been designed to enhance proenvironmental behaviours, such as: ClimateDrops (shaping climate awarness), ToGoodToGo (helping zerowaste approach), WeSpire (supporting companies), WasteApp (to decrease the size of waste), only few to be mentioned. However, most of them has focused on sectorial approach only. We aim to introduce green currency operating based on app solution. The paper was structured to introduce the process of defining the functionality of greencoin application as a supportive solution for shaping urban resilience. The research team designed the theoretical framework for the application to approach the need of planning for adaptable cities and mitigating climate changes. The work brought studies on existing currencies, urban solutions and data-driven initiatives enhancing active citizens. The process became a starting point for designing and testing the applicability and defining technical challenges to introduce such a solution. The aims of the paper are therefore as follows: • Defined solutions which should be included in the green currency design to help to mitigate climate changes. • Established base for green currency design and defined functionality of the greencoin app to stimulate eco living choices. • Introduced framework for the technical solutions to empower the successful implementation of the process. To introduce the theoretical framework allowing the conceptualization of greencoin app we based our research on a methodological approach including case study review, success stories, data mining techniques. The designing process however is based on the product design and moonshot thinking methodology. The paper introduces the concept for the functionality of the application to influence urban eco lifestyles.
Presenters Hanna Obracht-Prondzyńska
Assistant Professor, University Of Gdańsk
Co-authors
KR
Kacper Radziszewski
Assistant, Gdańsk University Of Technology
PW
Pawel Weichbroth
Assistant Professor, Gdańsk University Of Technology
HA
Helena Anacka
PhD Researcher, Gdańsk University Of Technology
KW
Kacper Wereszko
PhD Researcher, Gdańsk University Of Technology
The LA River Fish Passage: Urban Ecology as the Backbone of Urban DesignView Abstract
Case Study Report 02:00 PM - 03:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/11 11:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/11 12:30:00 UTC
The iconic Los Angeles River used to be a free-flowing natural river that caused frequent and drastic floods in the neighborhoods through which it ran. In the 1960s, engineers channelized the entire fifty-one miles of the river, directing stormwater away from populated areas. The concrete channel—an efficient method of water conveyance–remains key to protecting people, property, and wildlife from flooding. The urban patterns and transportation that developed following the reconfiguration of the river banks have shaped LA's current urban morphologies. One million people live within one mile of the LA River, which closely ties them to the creatures that inhabit it. The abundance of wildlife and adjacency of urbanized settings have offered Angelenos various types of ecosystem services. The riparian biome in and around the LA River has led to continuous reimagining of ways to embrace and improve its urban presence. Can natural disaster be eliminated while celebrating a human-nature bounded system? This paper will explain how prioritizing urban ecology can be an effective approach for guiding urban design and enhancing urban resiliency. By partially naturalizing the river, the pilot project LA River Fish Passage creates habitats for target species, proposes a new form of public open space, and engages the community in protecting wildlife while minimizing the flood risks. The Passage project comes out of the 2020 LA River Master Plan that addresses strategies and opportunities for using and maintaining the public spaces within and along the LA River. This LA-based case study offers new possibilities for design solutions in cities around the globe: 35 other cities and regions featuring endemism of plants and animals are recognized as global hotspots alongside LA. Highlighting urban ecology could alleviate the impact of global warming, reducing climatic catastrophes that result in huge costs to urban areas.
Presenters Yuliang Jiang
Research Associate, School Of Architecture, University Of Southern California
Towards a resilient city adapting to climate change: tackling the society strategic plan for Biella city 2050 as a climate urbanism case , Northern ItalyView Abstract
Case Study Report 02:00 PM - 03:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/11 11:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/11 12:30:00 UTC
Biella is a name of a city and a capital of the province of the same name, it forms a complex territory which has been considered as the cradle of the industrial revolution in Italy, inherited urban and social values which promoted the city now to defined as a creative city mainly with the luxury wool fabrics in northern Italy, Piedmont region. Climate change CC creates new societal challenges which affect the transformation of the society fabric ending with environmental displacement, because of, the whole socio-cultural-economic world has already affected the way that our cities perform not just the environment, we have to go forward from sustainable urbanism to climate urbanism to achieve real livable places and resistant societies. This shift is characterized by new policies, programs aimed to, considering climate alterations as a present condition instead of a future hazard and seeking to the actual implications on the case study of Biella’s Society, with the influence of built environment, Natural environment, Economy, and mobility, started by mapping the climate change potential effects through this approaches then tackling it through a systemic approach developing comprehensive spatial and infrastructure response with the aim of evolving new models of living together, finally to promoting the horizontal metropolis as a proper site of climate action instead of running local policies based on centers – peripheries narratives! Inspired by Freud, the Levels of consciousness represent in three different layers, the conscious level consists of all the things we are aware of, including things we know about ourselves and our surroundings. The pre-conscious consists of things we could pay conscious attention to if we so desired and is where many memories are stored for easy retrieval. Freud saw the pre-conscious is composed of thoughts that are unconscious at the moment in question, but available for recall and easily capable of becoming conscious. The unconscious level consists of things that are outside of conscious awareness, including many memories, thoughts, and urges of which we are not aware. Much of what is stored in the unconscious is thought to be unpleasant or conflicting. While these elements are stored out of our awareness, they are nevertheless thought to influence our behavior. By the three levels of inspiration, and through a dense interview with different stakeholders and representatives of the public, private and third sector, the project moved forward with an AI tool to the real needs and the accurate spatial positions by verification what we called “formal and informal” different responses in collaboration with climate change response of the whole territory. The interventions were highlighted to achieve a (well-being society), passing from (welfare society) as a very different concept since the works on individual and collective engagement and commitment, an advance translation targeting a resilient society that adapt also with the circumstances of CC, to develop a (well-being) spaces, buildings, livable built environment on the city mainly by listing to the people, which serve different communities and help them to interact and sympathize, also to have a role in activating the democratic and participatory meanings. By connecting the urban nodes and achieving thriving public spaces for all society layers such as playful, learning spaces for children, active areas for adults, interaction areas for elderlies, helping to create a resistant society against the hazards, focusing on heritage place, smart culture, tourism places, urban connectivity places,.. etc, taking in consideration the required SDGs of the city as a territory of wool and set recommendations for collaborative and deliberative modes of environmental governance.
Presenters Mahmoud Nagy Elsayed
MSc Candidate, Politecnico Di Torino
Planning for the Wild–Urban InterfaceView Abstract
Research Paper 02:00 PM - 03:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/11 11:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/11 12:30:00 UTC
This paper contributes to scholarly debates on urbanisation and environmental change with respect to the wildland–urban interface and heat-induced weather and climate conditions, namely compound drought and heat waves, conducive to extreme wildfire events of relevance to the Mediterranean-type climate regions of Africa, Australia, Europe, North and South America. The study site is the wildland–urban interface in the Regional Unit of East Attica, Greece, where an extreme wildfire event took place on 23 July 2018. The paper deals with supply-side drivers of urbanisation by analysing the ‘Special Urban Plan’ for that area (2020–2021) from a broader land policy perspective concerning the delimitation of forest land under the completion of the national land registry by 2024. This ‘Special Urban Plan’, commissioned to the Technical Chamber of Greece by the Ministry of the Environment and Energy, is the first planning instrument of its kind to incorporate measures for fire protection in relation to climate change, climate and weather extremes, and related disasters, and will be a benchmark for other wildland–urban interfaces in Greece. The paper brings front and centre the role of planning in development rights allocation to dissect how the small to medium scale alterations, adjusted to the pre-existing settlement pattern that this ‘Special Urban Plan’ promulgates, position climate action in the property development patterns in Greece. The analytical framework brings together scholarly literature on remote sensing and geospatial analysis, and urbanisation in Southern Europe, drawing respectively upon the works of Wentz and colleagues (2018) on the multidimensional analysis of urban form, and Chorianopoulos and Pagonis (2020) on urbanisation in Attica. The data used are the official texts and maps of the ‘Special Urban Plan’, and related legal texts, which are publicly available online from the Directorate of Planning for Metropolitan, Urban and Peri-urban Areas of the Ministry of the Environment and Energy, the Official Government Gazette, and the Council of State (the Supreme Administrative Court of Greece). The research is generally applicable to the theoretical and empirical investigation of climate action in land policy, planning, and property development.
Presenters
TP
Themistoklis Pellas
National Technical University Of Athens (NTUA)
Socio Ecological System of Urban Lakes, Case of Jakkur Lake Precinct, Bangalore View Abstract
Research Paper 02:00 PM - 03:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/11 11:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/11 12:30:00 UTC
Making existing cities and new urban development more ecologically based is an urgent priority in the global push for sustainability. The study is focused on changing role and state of nature of urban ecological systems in the midst of urban sprawl and rapid urbanization. Sustainable urban design principles need to be applied in the upcoming urban development models. This research is based on the socio-ecological system framework that people and nature are linked systems, emphasizing that humans must be seen as a part of, not apart from, nature. The research takes forward one of the eco-city dimensions in sustainable urban development- Water systems that are the principal, existential and vital generator of the formation and transformation of cities. Urban Lakes are one of the key elements responsible for environmental sustainability that need to be integrated in a holistic manner in urban development. The paper investigates the relationship of water with urban morphology in one of the rapidly urbanizing cities in India - Bangalore. Bangalore once known as the ‘land of thousand lakes’ is no longer the city of lakes. The city of Bangalore is an example of how the harmonious relationship of people and water has been disrupted over the years. My exploration is on applying principles of water sensitive urbanism in Bangalore’s urban lake system. The detailed study of Jakkur lake precinct analyzes networked lake system in Hebbal Valley: Yellamallappa Chetty lake series with settlements dependent on it for social, cultural, recreational, economic and religious aspects. It gives rise to discrete interactions with nature and constitute unique social and ecological interfaces. It reveals an understanding of the underlying natural processes and ecological systems that can be integrated to frame key development principles for sustainable city development. There is need to integrate water systems within urban development in a holistic manner so that they can remain valuable community assets that enhance livability and support the ecosystems that rely on them. Urban development along water system is an important interface between planning and ecology which demands environmentally responsive strategies. Eco City planning and design approach is to restructure the lake area prioritizing the development for non-motorized modes and human oriented development pattern. This will enable diverse greenspaces and built spaces of essentially equal value to spatially intertwine. The open spaces along the valley can serve as eco-mobility network within the city which can provide alternate mobility in the city interlinked to public transit nodes. The aim is to devise a new urban development paradigm realizing lakes as the new ecological asset to organize urban morphology and a green network to the city’s dense urban fabric. The development of urban design principles for co-existence of ecology and urban form where the natural environment permeates the city’s spaces and embraces the city. The urban lake area development can be restructured where the urban lake systems co-exist with the urban form and guide urban morphology in response to the ecological systems. A holistic development of this manner will enable replenishing of water sources in an urban area and restores water balance in the city.
Presenters
MG
MANASA GARIKAPARTHI
Urban Designer, Oasis Designs Inc
Urban Climatic DesignView Abstract
Research Paper 02:00 PM - 03:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/11 11:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/11 12:30:00 UTC
Urbanization is the most transformative trend of 21st century being witnessed by mankind. The United Nations 2018 report envisages Delhi to be world’s most populous city by 2028 with 37.2 million people. As per McKinsey, it is expected that India will add more than 20 billion square metres of residential floor area to meet the housing needs of the increasing population. The paper investigates three key phenomena in the rapidly urbanizing Delhi Metropolitan region: Climate change, housing demand and its impact on outdoor thermal comfort. As Delhi urbanizes rapidly, witnessing large scale high density residential development it’s contributing to the majority of built volume in cities. The main hypothesis of this applied and action based research is that urban housing typologies, morphological transformations and changing spatial patterns have been playing a major role in contributing to urban heat islands. There is an urgent need to study the relations between housing form, micro climate, climatic indices and consequent impacts on urban heat islands in outdoor conditions. The aim is to evaluate contemporary housing typology on the basis of factors influencing its built form such as master plan, building regulations, stakeholders, logistics, real estate forces, changing technology etc. and their response to climatic variables such as temperature, humidity, wind, radiation etc. The objective is to conduct study of micro climatic variables in the metropolitan region of Delhi. Form-climate relations have been investigated at the local level in six sites in Delhi by conducting field based survey using calibrated instruments and tools for site based measurement. The focus areas are on the peripheral areas of the city which are predominantly residential in land use with plotted housing, mid-rise walk up apartments and high rise group housing forming distinct morphological districts. The inferences from these six site studies have been demonstrated via integrated modelling and simulation tools to underline the complex interdependencies between transforming three-dimensional urban typologies and newly emerging heat island effects. This research project aims to add important insights on how new parametric simulation tools can assess the impact of newly emerging urban typologies on urban thermal environment forming distinct districts. The proposed output of the analysis will enable to devise form based guidelines for spatial planning and design to evaluate the environmental performance of housing morphology. Various dimensions of housing design decisions like distance between buildings, shade factor, orientation, built envelope, and open space structure will be informed through the use of the modelling tool. The outcomes of this research will support developers, architects and urban practitioners in taking informed decisions in the development processes, integrating urban development and sustainability. The research project aims to focus and strengthen disciplinary knowledge in building climate friendly and sustainable urban environment by investigating relationships of urban housing form and outdoor thermal comfort with Delhi as a case. Beyond this research the study further aims to simulate various development alternatives to illustrate how urban heat islands can be mitigated through spatial planning and design.
Presenters
MG
MANASA GARIKAPARTHI
Urban Designer, Oasis Designs Inc
Changing paradigms on Net-Zero Carbon ambitions: A Build-in-Wood roadmap for multi-storey wood building support policiesView Abstract
Case Study Report 02:00 PM - 03:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/11 11:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/11 12:30:00 UTC
An intense political focus on cutting energy consumption from the use phase of buildings has dominated the European political agenda for the past several decades, with significant results being supported by European policies and initiatives such as the Covenant of Mayors, which has been signed by more than 10,000 cities intent on achieving climate neutrality. The building sector is, however, still responsible for more than a third of the GHG emissions, and more than a third of the total waste produced, with building material reuse percentages still at 1%. In the last decades, the attention on GHG emissions beyond in-use operational energy demand has been less pronounced, even if there are significant reductions to be gained by focusing on the choice of construction materials and logistics involved. Policy efforts to decarbonize the European building stock by taking a whole-life carbon perspective on the potential of multi-storey wood buildings is the object of our case study report, which focuses on the Build-in-Wood project, financed under the Horizon 2020 work programme, LC-RUR-11-2019-2020: „Sustainable wood value chains”. Build-in-Wood (2019-2023) aims to make wood a natural choice of building material for the construction of multi-storey buildings by addressing technical, economic, legislative, and psychological barriers hindering the large-scale uptake of wood in the construction sector. A key part of the project is the involvement of 7 Early Adopter Cities (EACs) in novel urban and urban-rural wood building policy development: Brașov (Romania), Innsbruck (Austria), Trento (Italy), Copenhagen (Denmark), Trondheim (Norway), Borough of Haringey (UK) and Metropolitan Region of Amsterdam (Netherlands). While cities already elaborate strategic plans to address climate change issues (eg. SEAP, SECAP, SUMP) through energy efficiency measures, none of these currently address the embodied energy and carbon challenges for achieving true carbon neutrality. The work carried out and included in this report is three-fold: it matches 1) the urban context and existing policies for the built environment and forestry sector with 2) the drivers, perceptions, wood value chain state of play in each EAC; and 3) based on these results, it formulates possible policy pathways suitable for the specific carbon neutrality goals and expectations of very different cities across Europe. This work is achieved through an indicator-driven analysis method focused on four evaluative dimensions (socio-demographic context, environmental context, the regional territorial capital, and economic and market context) and through plan and policy review. A synthetic overview of the commonalities and differences of the EAC contexts in terms of current development trends is presented, as well as a comparative assessment of different levels of support for multi-storey wood buildings through the specific national, regional, and local policies and regulations. Further, this analysis is corroborated with a qualitative assessment of stakeholder perceptions, needs, challenges, and opportunities, as well as the main barriers for the wood value chain, perceived through the wider groups of stakeholders involved on behalf of the EACs. Forwards, as an interim result of this ongoing project, the paper explores possible specific pathways to bring the challenge of accounting for embodied carbon to the forefront of planning and policy-making based on the main findings in each EAC. Finally, the paper discusses the added value brought at the European level in terms of possible replicability in other cities on two layers: (1) analysis framework methodology for finding strategic entry points for multi-storey wood building support and (2) policy integration directions and long term actions to enable cities to understand and address true carbon neutrality through different tools according to their specific context.
Presenters Sabina LEOPA
Deputy Director, URBASOFIA
Ionela Mădălina Rusen
Assistant Manager / Urban Planner, S.C URBASOFIA S.R.L.
Implementing Innovative, Smart, Regenerative Ecosystems in an Eastern-European Post-Industrial ContextView Abstract
Case Study Report 02:00 PM - 03:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/11 11:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/11 12:30:00 UTC
Traditional industry and natural resources exploitation processes represented the stepping stone for intensive urbanization, contributing to the creation of cities and society as we know them. Economic development based on intensive exploitation activities with a negative impact on nature has clearly shown to be unsustainable. The city of Baia Mare, located in the Romanian region of Maramureș, is one of the best examples of post-industrial cities that are developing a holistic restructuring process while struggling with the urban, social, economic, and environmental effects of the former industrial and mining activities. As the former mining capital of Romania, its main urban challenge is to re-incorporate its highly polluted brownfields and mitigate the degraded environmental conditions. The area became of international concern after the January 2000 event, when accidental cyanide spills affected the natural ecosystems of the Tisza and Danube rivers. Even though the mining and metallurgical industry closed, the soil is still polluted with high levels of heavy-metal contaminants (approximately 627 ha at the metropolitan level). The subject of our Case-Study Report is project SPIRE -Smart Post-industrial Regeneration Ecosystems. Financed under the 4th call of the UIA programme, SPIRE is an experimental project that aims to start a long-term environmental, social and economic redevelopment in Baia Mare by implementing gentle, ecological, regenerative solutions to the contaminated areas. When talking about heavy-metal contaminated land, municipalities have limited options to overcome the obstacle. Traditional soil remediation is expensive, and when it comes to private-owned land for developments or conversions, there is the risk of poor-quality interventions. The low level of community’s awareness concerning health risks also represents a concern. SPIRE opted for an ecologic and relatively cheap solution, of reusing the contaminated land of the city of Baia Mare, enabling an experimental and community-oriented process of remediation of 5 pilot sites (summing 7.5 ha of land). This is possible through adaptive phytoremediation and the creation of new urban ecosystems. This Case-Study Report discusses the solutions adopted and how the framework was created. SPIRE developed a Remediation Toolkit, put to test in a co-designed landscaping process of the 5 experimental sites. When implementing smart, innovative, regenerative ecosystems in the current social and cultural context of Baia Mare, it is considered very valuable to raise awareness about environmental issues and to promote good ecological behaviour. This is achieved by actively involving the local community, businesses, and local actors and stakeholders in all components/pillars of the SPIRE initiative: 1. Site transformations: co-design activities resulted in the landscaping solutions used for planting and path/alleys tracing, followed by a series of workshops for micro-interventions solutions; 2. Circular economy framework: SPIRE constructs a multi-level framework for upcycling biomass, resulted from phytoremediation (pilot thermal installation, and innovative start-up ideas that re-uses biomass); 3. Community-oriented digital solutions: with the purpose of generating enhanced participation/engagement of communities in the SPIRE project (digital token for incentivising positive and environmentally friendly behaviour), providing GIS-based tools and platforms for participatory decision making. 4. Community innovative HUB and SPIRE Makerspace: representing the physical infrastructure as the interface between project and community, supporting local businesses and innovative ecologic initiatives, by putting at disposal knowledge, tools, working space. This Report conveys valuable knowledge on an ongoing experimental initiative, geared towards the implementation of innovative, smart, and regenerative ecosystems in post-industrial cities. Our Report provides technical and operational knowledge and insights that can be useful for the reproduction of similar approaches in other cities and countries.
Presenters Pietro L. Verga
SPIRE Project Manager & Scientific Coordinator, URBASOFIA / EC UIA And URBACT Expert
Co-authors Codruț-Lucian Papina
Urban Planner, URBASOFIA
Climate Crisis Adaptation – Strategies Towards Resilience – Urban and Architectural Interventions in Milan and Vienna View Abstract
Research Paper 02:00 PM - 03:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/11 11:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/11 12:30:00 UTC
Most large cities worldwide have recently experienced the dramatic effects of the climate crisis. The focus of this paper lies on illustrating different scenarios for cities on a 1.5-degree pathway, which means a 50-55% net emissions reduction by 2030 compared to 2010 levels. The two selected cities, Milan and Vienna, are comparable in size, social makeup and geographic position. Both cities have experienced the impact of climate change regarding the increase of heat in the city, have already invested in environmental issues and want to become carbon neutral. These commonalities form the base for a comparison and for the definition of the next steps. Current strategies, urban and architectural interventions, as well as future initiatives in both cities will be compared with more innovative ones that go beyond the status quo. The COVID-19 outbreak and the lockdowns in Vienna and Milan have acted as game-changers. Closed streets facilitated pedestrian and cyle movement. The question is how many of these interventions will remain and could be upscaled, also considering that public investment in environmental transition became feasible in the framework of recovery and resilience plans. Although the negative health consequences of constant exposure to air pollution were already known, addressing them has now gained additional weight. Governments are well-advised to likewise use the strategies they developed for fighting COVID-19 to undertake serious efforts in fighting climate change. Research and Action Plan This paper focuses on illustrating different scenarios for cities on a 1.5-degree pathway, meaning a 50-55% net emissions reduction by 2030 compared to 2010 levels. Major business, economic and societal shifts would underlie a transition to this pathway, but not all of them can be addressed in cities: 1. Industry 2. Transport 3. Power 4. Buildings 5. Avoided Deforestation & Agriculture Current strategies and activities in the cities of Vienna and Milan will provide the groundwork for their applicability elsewhere. Urban and architectural interventions will be evaluated and exchanged to share knowledge. The goal is to develop a flexibly applicable and further developable parts kit. Vienna suffers from a severe lack of green spaces in the densely built-up inner districts. High pollution levels in Milan have negatively affected the population for years. Despite the visible effects of cleaner air and skies, climate change has not slowed down, since CO2 stays long in the atmosphere, which constitutes the main environmental factor. There is growing scientific evidence of a connection between environmental pollution and COVID-19-related mortality rates. Environmental factors like the pre-outbreak level of air pollution—especially nitrogen dioxide (NO2) –play a role. Cities are key contributors to climate change and at the same time their residents experience the consequences most directly through the negative impact on urban life. Cities have to start implementing radical measures in order to achieve visible results: transform the sources of energy provision, apply innovative planning solutions that avoid further sprawl leading to densification, promote a sustainable way of building and renovating the existing building stock following the principles of a circular economy, secure the provision of CO2-neutral public transportation and transform mobility behavioral patterns. These enormous tasks are difficult to carry out alone. Cities with similar challenges and comparable resources like Milan and Vienna can therefore support each other and act together. Environmental agendas have gained significant support in the population and new behavioral patterns were rapidly adopted. Most importantly, though, the ambitious goals and new guidelines of the EU, combined with “green transformation” requirements for the recovery fund, are good reasons to hope that the transformation to carbon neutrality will now succeed.
Presenters Silja Tillner
Head Of The Firm, Architekten Tillner & Willinger
"BAMBOO" A GLOCAL SOLUTIONView Abstract
Research Paper 02:00 PM - 03:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/11 11:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/11 12:30:00 UTC
ABSTRACT “BAMBOO” A GLOCAL SOLUTION Bamboo has been in wide usage since ancient times as a low-cost material for houses,bridges etc. They are the largest members of the grass family & are the fastest growing in the world. It grows approximately 4 feet in a day [in 24 hours time period]. Bamboos are of noteableeconomic & cultural significance in South Asia, South East Asia and East Asia, being use for bldg.materials as a food source & as a versatile raw product. Bamboo has higher compressive strength than wood brick / concrete & tensile strength that rivals steel & for height. Bamboo can resist forces created by high velocity wind and earthquakes. This is a substitute building material which is renewable, environment friendly & widely available, as the wood resources are diminishing & restrictions are imposed on felling the natural forests. Due to its rapid growth its adaptability to most climate conditions & due to its properties Bamboo emerges as a very suitable alternative. Industrial treated bamboos have shown great potential for production of composite Materials and components which are cost effective and can be successfully utilised for structural & non-structural applications in construction. Uses of bamboos in construction: footing, trusses, walls, scaffolding, tile roofing, reinforcement etc. Advantages : strong natural fibre, versatile material, extremely flexible, lightweight in comparison to other conventional bldg. material, sustainable & renewable ,cost effective ,construction can be done with simple tools and local artisans creating employment opportunities and empowering artisans(Glocal solution),controls soil erosion ,bamboo consumes high quantities of nitrogen so it reduces water pollution, as the urban spaces are surrounded by industries it is essential to grow bamboo alongside industrial area where it converts waste water into nutrients for its own growth , enhancement in organic farming, it is also known to desalinate sea water ,its natural waxy surface doesn’t require painting making it safe from health hazards caused by paints(they contain toxic substances) ,out of all the bldg. materials bamboo is least hazardous in terms of waste as it can be recycled & does not have disposal problems, fire resistance of bamboo is very high it can with stand temperature upto 4000 degree c., elasticity of bamboo is high. Few limitations which can be overcome easily : Bamboo is prone to insect & fungal invasion , so hazardous pesticides are used on it but not in its cultivation ,special fastening techniques are required while joining pieces of bamboo etc. The realisation that bamboo is the most potentially important non timber resource and rapid growing woody biomass, has evoked keen interest in the processing, reservation, utilisation and the promotion of bamboo has an alternative to wood and as building material. To re-establish a healthy urban environment we seek to develop policies for adaptable cities and to make the building environment more resilient to extreme weather conditions and to overcome challenges such as pollution , climate change , heat islands and resistance against health hazards ( eg : pandemic covid 19). Utilisation of bamboo as an alternative building material will be considered as Glocal solution for implementing of circulatory , urban metabolism sponge and eco-systematic approaches. The detailed case study will be presented in paper later. KEYWORDS:BAMBOOS,ECONOMICAL,VELOCITY,DESALINATE,RESILIENCE,ADAPATIBILITY,GLOCAL,URBAN-METABOLISM SPONGE, ECO-SYSTEMATIC .
Presenters
HJ
Hiral Joshi
Student, NMIMS
Implementing Nature-based Solutions: the role of experts in co-creation processes and in new governance structures View Abstract
Research Paper 02:00 PM - 03:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/11 11:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/11 12:30:00 UTC
The environmental crisis of XXI century is increasingly manifesting its negative impacts, especially in cities. Air pollution, heat island effects, adverse events such as flooding are only some of the most recurrent issues affecting public health and quality of life in cities. At the same time, the challenges but also the opportunities related to urbanisation have encouraged a global effort to re-think urban environments in an innovative way, especially through new solutions that address multiple issues and wide societal challenges (environmental, social, economic) at the same time. In this context, the concept of nature-based solutions (NBS) is receiving more and more attention, with various research studies and applications in several cities. Particularly in Europe, the European Commission is funding various projects and initiatives, becoming a global leader in innovating with nature to achieve more sustainable and resilient societies. NBS projects are often associated with the concept of ecosystem services and they are usually considered more complex and uncertain than traditional grey infrastructure projects. In fact, NBS are essentially dynamic (natural features evolve over time), they present a character of multiplicity (in terms of stakeholders involved, design solutions considered and co-benefits provided), and they are adaptive (tailored to the conditions of the local context without a one-fits-all solutions). These intrinsic features raise relevant issues and demand more flexible governance models and participatory processes as inclusive as possible. The complexity of nature-based solutions is also reflected in the multiple barriers to implementation, not only financial; these usually include the lack of adequate knowledge and experience, difficulties in capturing the multiple benefits of NBS, possible trade-offs and conflicts between the groups involved. Experts can support both local authorities and local communities along the process, thus playing an important role in the successful implementation of projects. Our contribution focuses on the inclusion of expert knowledge in the design, implementation and monitoring of NBS. Drawing from the latest European projects and reports and literature, the paper will underline some of the main challenges and criticalities related to the involvement of experts in green policy-making. More specifically, the paper briefly illustrates three macro-themes that deserve particular attention: the tensions between local and expert knowledge in the participative co-creation of NBS; the political legitimacy of expert knowledge; and the local financial and administrative capacity to cope with NBS implementation, monitoring, maintenance and management in the medium-long term.
Presenters Federico Aili
Project Manager, ISOCARP Institute – Centre For Urban Excellence
Co-authors
OA
Oscar Luigi Azzimonti
University Of Milano Bicocca
A Framework for incorporating Supply-Demand equity into Pedestrian and Bicycle Traffic System plans – A case of Huilongguan-Tiantongyuan District in BeijingView Abstract
Case Study Report 02:00 PM - 03:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/11 11:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/11 12:30:00 UTC
The emergence of COVID-19 pandemic makes governments around the world start to attach greater importance to the planning of Pedestrian and Bicycle Traffic Systems (PBTS)[1]. However, efficient and reasonable urban PBTS need to conform to the current situation of supply-demand differentiation of public walking or cycling, and to achieve the fairness of public access and process, which is of great significance to the improvement of the overall resilience management and the applicability of public space. But nowadays, most cities’ PBTS planning considering PBTS demand side (such as population, travel behavior, etc.) more superior to supply side (such as public transport hub)[2], at the same time, the lack of analytical data and methods used has also resulted in few studies taking into account the capacity and quality of services actually provided by urban public facilities. On this basis, this study proposed a complete PBTS planning analysis framework. In this framework, the Minimum Cumulative Resistance model (MCR) and the Geographically Weighted Regression model (GWR) were introduced as the core method of the whole analysis process. In terms of data sources, the Internet Word-of-Mouth Big Data (IWOM) is used as the basis for evaluating the ability of urban public service facilities to attract walking and bicycle behavior. In the end, the area of Huilongguan-Tiantongyuan District (H&T) in Changping District of Beijing is exemplified for empirical analysis. H&T is a residential community area with the largest population in Asia, and the tidal traffic in the region is remarkable. H&T’s simulation process of public walking and cycling behavior consists of four steps, including screening the diffusion sources of PBTS, evaluation of spatial suitability of urban walking and cycling, MCR diffusion simulation and GWE analysis. On this basis, the supply - demand analysis of H&T PBTS is completed, and further support the planning of H&T PBTS. The research found that: (1) The MCR model can analyze the suitability of spatial diffusion under the influence of multiple factors in a specific area, while the GWR model measures the relationship between different suitability results from a spatial perspective. The combination of the two can provide practical basis for the evaluation of the supply and demand status of urban PBTS. (2) IWOM big data can help us comprehensively and accurately obtain the public's satisfaction with urban public service facilities on a larger scale, although there are shortcomings in data users, urban function types and general applicability, etc. However, it cannot be denied that it provides quantitative support for the selection and diffusion simulation process of PBTS suppliers. (3) Due to the involvement of various urban built environmental factors (such as slope, urban road landscape, etc.), the framework proposed in this paper can more comprehensively analyze the impact of urban environment on PBTS planning. In the face of different urban environmental conditions, its environmental factors also need to be adjusted flexibly and appropriately in order to improve the applicability of the research framework. [1]. Moreno, C., Allam, Z., Chabaud, D., Gall, C., & Pratlong, F. (2021). Introducing the “15-Minute City”: Sustainability, Resilience and Place Identity in Future Post-Pandemic Cities. Smart Cities, 4(1), 93-111. https://doi.org/10.3390/smartcities4010006. [2]. Lagerwey, P. A., Hintze, M. J., Elliott, J. B., Toole, J. L., & Schneider, R. J. (2015). Pedestrian and bicycle transportation along existing roads—ActiveTrans priority tool guidebook (No. Project 07-17). National Cooperative Highway Research Program (Chapter 2).
Presenters
JF
Junming Feng
Student, Beijing Forestry University School Of Landscape Architecture
Co-authors
YL
Yue Li
Beijing Forestry University School Of Landscape Architecture
SL
Shuo Lv
Beijing Forestry University School Of Landscape Architecture
Assistant Professor
,
University of Gdańsk
Research Associate
,
School of Architecture, University of Southern California
MSc candidate
,
Politecnico di Torino
Student
,
Beijing Forestry University School of Landscape Architecture
National Technical University of Athens (NTUA)
+ 6 more speakers. View All
 Olga Jerjomina
ISOCARP - Technical Administrator
 Kate Holmquist
Principal/ Deputy-Chair, ISOCARP Scientific Committee
,
WerkSTADT Urban Planning + Development
Mr Pedro Garcia
professeur agrégé
,
Université Laval
 Hanna Obracht-Prondzyńska
Assistant Professor
,
University of Gdańsk
Student
,
Tianjin University
Prof Ali Alraouf
Congress Advisor and Professor - ISOCARP Board Member
,
HBKU
Mr Dmitry Boyko
director
,
GeoClever LLC
Mr Jinglun Du
PhD candidate
,
Eindhoven University of Technology
 Munawar Irfaan S
Urban Design graduate
,
School of Planning and Architecture , New Delhi
+24 more attendees. View All
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