Track 5: Uniqueness and connectivity. Al-Baraha: unlocking urban futures Fayruz 2
Nov 11, 2021 02:00 PM - 03:30 PM(Asia/Qatar)
20211111T1400 20211111T1530 Asia/Qatar Hybrid | Track 5 | Session 6. Infrastructure and mobility for broader connectivity

The last hybrid session will collect contributions related to connectivity and infrastructure in its broadest sense, not only related to mobility. Contributions will present studies and experiences of urban infrastructures conceived and designed with a multipurpose approach: these include metro stations built on heritage sites or paradigmatic examples of train stations designed with a careful consideration of the surrounding space and its qualities. Contributions will also study and reflect on the potentialities of green TODs and on greening interventions to convert motorways. Other researchers will provide input on socio-spatial integration, topometric space differences and the benefits of a compact urban form.  

NOTE: Speakers marked in * will participate in this hybrid session as a virtual attendee.

Fayruz 2 57th ISOCARP World Planning Congress in Doha, Qatar ajuurinen@xtalks.com

The last hybrid session will collect contributions related to connectivity and infrastructure in its broadest sense, not only related to mobility. Contributions will present studies and experiences of urban infrastructures conceived and designed with a multipurpose approach: these include metro stations built on heritage sites or paradigmatic examples of train stations designed with a careful consideration of the surrounding space and its qualities. Contributions will also study and reflect on the potentialities of green TODs and on greening interventions to convert motorways. Other researchers will provide input on socio-spatial integration, topometric space differences and the benefits of a compact urban form.  

NOTE: Speakers marked in * will participate in this hybrid session as a virtual attendee.

Towards electrified public bus transport in Latin AmericaView Abstract
Research Paper 02:00 PM - 03:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/11 11:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/11 12:30:00 UTC
Emissions from the transportation sector generate over $ 1 trillion in health damage every year. The growth of that sector has also contributed to expanding greenhouse gas emissions associated with rising sea levels, temperatures, fires, and other impacts on climate change. Urban bus fleets are the primary way of urban mobility for hundreds of millions of citizens in Latin America. However, those fleets are yet powered by diesel, an obsolete, and highly polluting technology. In order to tackle the challenges imposed on air quality and climate by diesel engines, cities must embrace an energy and technological transition. E-buses are an excellent solution for promoting cleaner and healthier urban areas while supporting local and national governments to achieve their climate goals. In this context, the expansion of e-bus fleets in Latin American cities is key to the economic and global future. This study aims to review the emerging trend of electric buses’ deployment in Latin America within the general framework of the concept of sustainable mobility. The article develops an overview of electric bus technologies available on the Latin American market and a spatial analysis of fleet deployment in Latin America. The analysis of the spatial distribution of e-buses in Latin America indicated that, in terms of the number of vehicles in operation, Chile and Colombia are the regional leaders and Santiago and Bogota are the cities holding the largest electric buses’ fleets. The study also indicates key factors to promote the technological transition and the electric buses’ deployment in Latin America: regulatory framework, clear and objective strategic planning, cooperation between national and local administration. Moreover, the case study of São Paulo (the largest Brazilian city) highlighted the typical limiting factors: political and regulatory limitations, high battery costs and dependency on infrastructure. Plus, one and half year into the covid19 pandemic led the local public transit system to a critical crisis. Passengers remain at home or they remain fearful of boarding buses and are using alternative transport modes. Consequently, public transit fares have fallen off a cliff. That economic crisis is a new challenge to electric buses’ deployment in Latin America. Finally, recommendations are presented to promote bus fleet replacement and to develop a comprehensive sustainable urban mobility strategy.
Presenters
VA
Victor Andrade
Associate Professor, LABMOB / Federal University Of Rio De Janeiro
Co-authors
JL
Jessica Lucena
Research Coordinator, LABMOB
MK
Marcela Kanitz
Research Cooridnator, LABMOB
Sub-area planning with EGO (equity goals oriented)View Abstract
Case Study Report 02:00 PM - 03:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/11 11:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/11 12:30:00 UTC
Unlocking a systems planning approach to district-level planning in Austin TX. While many cities in the USA suffer from demographic and socioeconomic segregation, our moral obligation as planners is to diminish displacement and connecting communities back together. This Case Study looks into the historically gentrified area of central Austin, TX (USA). Segregated by a highway, and with enormous pressure of development due to its proximity to the urban core, this study area is a great example of a century long history of planning mistakes. The case study in this session will inspire the search for uniqueness and the importance of connectivity in communities around the world. With a premise that "movement is the lifeblood of the city", this case study will dive deep into a methodology that helps planners find areas in the urban realm that can be retrofitted with an "EGO" approach (Equity Goals Oriented). The study is GIS based; it accounts for subjective and objective sets of data that are evaluated statistically, and transformed accordingly. The result of the statistically-based GIS approach, is a map that highlights the areas with high opportunity to retrofit within the city. The methodology used in this case study aims to highlight 3 principles for the planning profession: 1.- An equity lens in planning: helping planners unlock solutions to areas with high pressure of gentrification. 2.- Big data and mapping tools: informing decisions in every aspect of a planning process. 3.- Planner Leverage: Planners have a big (if not the strongest) power to leverage equitable, resilient and sustainable development.
Presenters Julio Carrillo
Planning And Urban Design Manager, Urban Land Institute | Parkhill
The Topo-metric Logic of Space in Two GCC Cities: Doha, Qatar and Muscat, OmanView Abstract
Research Paper 02:00 PM - 03:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/11 11:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/11 12:30:00 UTC
In the past, there has been a substantial amount of research examining the topo-metric characteristics of European and American settlements using space syntax (Hillier & Hanson, 1984 and 1986; Hillier, 1996; Carvalho & Penn, 2004; Shpuza, 2014; Major, 2015 and 2018). Such studies highlighted key topo-metric differences in the spatial logic of European and American settlements arising from various socio-economic and cultural factors. It is especially the case when using Major’s (2015 and 2018) rigorous methodology, which controls for axial size (i.e., the gross number of routes represented as axial lines) and the number of cul-de-sacs (i.e., one-connected axial lines) in urban systems. His research identified fundamental topo-metric divergences between settlements of continental Europe and the UK, and American ones ostensibly – though not rigorously – associated with westward expansion in the USA over time. The grander metric scale of American settlements also brought to light the role that topography can play in allowing, limiting, or denying certain possibilities for urban expansion (Major, 2015 and 2018). However, there has been very little research examining the topo-metric parameters of settlements elsewhere in the world to date. The research in this paper begins to address this gap in our knowledge by examining two settlements in the GCC region: Doha, Qatar, and Muscat, Oman. It is also part of a larger study that will eventually incorporate the space syntax modeling of Metropolitan Amman, Jordan (Alomari, 2022), and other metropolitan regions as they become available to researchers in the DAUP-CENG at Qatar University. Doha and Muscat share many similarities in their origins as coastal settlements with ports on the Arabian/Persian Gulf. However, a key difference is terrain: Muscat is mountainous, whereas Doha is relatively flat. Previous studies of Metropolitan Doha and Muscat using space syntax demonstrate this had profound consequences for rapid urbanization in the late 20th and early 21st century (Tannous, 2020; Tannous & Major, 2020). Doha grew in a globally compact, concentric manner radiating outward in all directions from its coastal origins. In contrast, Muscat grew in a locally compact, extended linear fashion in an east-to-west direction to overcome topographical barriers for urban expansion. The paper examines consistencies and covariations in the metric and spatial parameters of Metropolitan Doha and Muscat using Major’s (2015) previous methodology. It includes quantifying and visualization of the total land area, average block size, maximum and mean street and segment lengths, and the maximum and mean values for a variety of spatial parameters, including connectivity, global and local integration, global choice, and mean depth from the most integrated street in the urban spatial network. At the heart of this paper are some key questions: what effect did these differing urban growth patterns have on the metric and spatial parameters of Doha and Muscat, and what might it mean for other settlements of the GCC region?
Presenters
SA
Sahar Alomari
Mastr's Program Student , Qatar University
Co-authors Mark David Major
Assistant Professor Of Architecture And Urban Planning, Qatar University
HT
Heba Tannous
Qatar University
The socio-spatial integration of knowledge districts into the city: Theoretical clarifications and evidence from Belval, Esch/AlzetteView Abstract
Research Paper 02:00 PM - 03:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/11 11:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/11 12:30:00 UTC
The regeneration of derelict urban areas by large-scale development projects presented as “knowledge-based” is perceived as a major policy and planning objective and as a potentially fruitful opportunity to trigger regional growth dynamics. However, it raises many questions regarding the integration of these knowledge districts into the city. Critical academic contributions have pointed at the potentially harmful consequences that these new-built redevelopment projects can have on the neighbouring districts, such as the marginalization of local communities and the growing socio-spatial inequalities that can be induced at the scale of the city. Others claim that these knowledge districts can constitute isolated, elitist neighbourhoods and thus completely fail regarding the initial objectives of socio-spatial integration and regional development. However, there are diverging conceptions in the scientific literature about how socio-spatial integration is understood and how it can be assessed by a holistic analytical framework. We argue that socio-spatial integration is a multidimensional concept that can be analysed through complementary approaches. In this paper, we first present our theoretical framework created to disentangle the complex integration concept. Secondly, we focus on a structural approach to the concept, which analyses the (dis)similarities between neighbourhoods and measures to what extent the social structure of a new-built knowledge district differs from the urban framework which it is attached to. To do this, we focus on the case of the Belval “Science City” in Esch/Alzette, Luxembourg, which is a large-scale and publicly driven urban project gathering the University of Luxembourg and an ecosystem of knowledge-intensive institutions. An indicator-based analysis clarifies the existing structural dissimilarities between the knowledge district and the adjacent neighbourhoods by addressing (i) the socioeconomic and sociodemographic structure, and (ii) the population’s feelings of belonging to the city of Esch/Alzette. Results show that the structural dissimilarities between the knowledge district and other neighbourhoods are significant. However, they are mainly due to the specific profile of the population who is attracted by this knowledge district (international and young professionals), while other factors, such as the socioeconomic standing, are not significant. Additionally, low electoral participation rates indicate that residents are not interested in taking part in local elections, which seems to suggest a low attachment to the city as a whole. This paper thus provides insights into the structural disparities that exist between old and new neighbourhoods in the city and shows to what extent they are deepened by the creation of a knowledge district.
Presenters
JB
Joe Birsens
PHD Candidate, LISER Luxembourg
Herrmann-Debroux gateway: a reconnection via a reconversion of a motorway View Abstract
Case Study Report 02:00 PM - 03:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/11 11:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/11 12:30:00 UTC
Reconversion of Brussels urban motorways The Brussels-Capital Region experiences approximately 5.4 million passengers movements daily, the majority of which are done by car with the commuter flow entering or leaving the Region representing 33% thereof. The Government of the Brussels-Capital Region is now at a critical point in terms of sustainable infrastructure management with an overuse of the regional road infrastructures. Therefore, it is necessary to find solutions adapted to the different needs to ensure the accessibility and connectivity of the city for goods and people while guaranteeing the quality of life for the population. Brussels is inspired by several successful reconversion of a motorway into an urban boulevard such as the Cheonggyecheon Expressway in Seoul, Korea, or the Embarcadero Freeway in San Francisco, USA (see P. Lecroart’s works (IAU Ile-de-France)). Herrmann-Debroux: planning for more resilience, sustainability, dynamism and ‘living together’ The Herrmann-Debroux area is one of the southern gateways to the Region, located at the border with the Flemish Region. It is one of the twelve strategic sites defined by the Government. Primarily built after the Second World War, it has become an urban periphery. The area is crossed by the ‘E411 motorway, composed of several viaducts, and is bordered by a wide variety of urban spaces and activities, e.g. forest, sports centres, shopping malls, office buildings, universities, schools, and a hospital. The E411 is a barrier for the large landscape elements that it crosses, particularly the forest. Furthermore, the activities around this axis are disconnected – offices, shops, dwellings, public transport. Road infrastructures – mainly the Herrmann-Debroux viaduct – constitute visual and physical barriers and a major environmental issue, i.e. air and noise pollution. The Brussels-Capital Region’s ambition is to transform the E411 motorway into an urban boulevard. This boulevard will be a multimodal mobility support and a collective resource for various uses, reconciling the city and its inhabitants with their infrastructures. The objectives are to improve the permeability of the transport axis, reconnect the green spaces and the water network, and increase porosity between the urban blocks. It is therefore necessary to weave the urban fabric by articulating the metropolitan, regional, and local scales. The transformation of this city entrance is a unique opportunity to develop a land-use mix including economic, social, and residential activities, to develop a uniqueness, improve the urban quality, and make ‘living together’ successful. The project includes a reflexion on five different neighborhoods along the future boulevard. For example, a new district will be developed on an existing railway wasteland. This new place will be a new connection for pedestrians and cyclists but will also accommodate equipements and productive activities. perspective.brussels is in charge of designing a Master Development Plan to translate these ambitions. This tool combines regulatory components with strategic ones. To avoid future ill-conceived urban infrastructures, the solutions proposed by the urban strategic plan must be reversible and flexible, insofar as is possible. The project is being developed in cooperation with the private and public sectors with local citizens’ participation. Approved for the first time in May 2019, the definitive Master Development Plan will be ready by the end of 2021. The Brussels-Capital Region plans to realise the project within 10 years. Within the requalification of this city entrance, and with the ambition to generate a connect, adaptable and resilient city, the Region wants to create an example for future urban infrastructure transformation at the European and international level.
Presenters
TS
Tom Sanders
Director Territorial Strategy, Perspective.brussels - Brussels Planning Agency
Co-authors
MD
Milène Deneubourg
Project Leader, Perspective.brussels (Brussels' Planning Agency)
Perceptions and challenges of place quality at High-Speed Rail station areas: experts’ interviewsView Abstract
Research Paper 02:00 PM - 03:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/11 11:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/11 12:30:00 UTC
This paper presents the findings of a qualitative analysis of expert interview surveys on place quality that should be implemented in inner-city HSR station areas. by examining three projects, the Central Station area in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, Hongqiao station in Shanghai, China, and Logroño station in Spain, the study queried a panel of 18 experts/key actors involved in these projects about their perceptions of the quality concept, quality elements, as well as the opportunities and constraints of working with other actors and parties in the complex process of quality making and development. The analysis revealed that the government’s strong will of achieving place quality had a commanding influence on the final presented quality. And a legal framework that promotes the close collaboration of different parties in a flexible timeline is another key to the success of the high-quality HSR station areas.
Presenters Jinglun Du
PhD Candidate, Eindhoven University Of Technology
Co-authors
OD
Oana Druta
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR, Eindhoven University Of Technology
pv
Pieter Van Wesemael
FULL PROFESSOR, Eindhoven University Of Technology
Post oil and gas future urban sustainability and relevance of a compact urban form for DohaView Abstract
Research Paper 02:00 PM - 03:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/11 11:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/11 12:30:00 UTC
After the discovery of oil-gas in Qatar, in the past few decades, Doha, its capital has dramatically grown from being a small fishing and pearling town to an international city with diversified economy. At the same time, it transformed from a small, compact, high-density and walkable traditional Arabic town of 1960s into an expansive car-dependent city with low-density sprawl all around. Since the 1970s, a radio-concentric urban form expanded out of the old core following the ‘A’ and ‘B’ ring roads and thereafter, expanded out rapidly following the ring roads constructed one after another, ‘G’ being the most recent and is also constantly expanding out along the newly added urban highways and mammoth expressways. Qatar’s population of 250k in 1981 grew to 2.4 million in 2015 and its lion’s share, i.e. around 2 million reside in the designated ‘Metropolitan Doha’ falling in Doha, and four more adjoining municipalities covering an area of around 1313sqkm with a gross density of merely 15pph. If the large number of contract-labourers staying in the labour camps is excluded, density would fall further. Very high car-dependency with more than 900k passenger cars on roads (2020) and the policy of adopting ‘car-priority designs’ or ‘highway design standards’ on roads are rapidly diluting the ‘concept of place’, disconnecting the communities, reducing walkability in the urban centres and in the neighbourhoods and contributing not only to carbon emission, but also affecting public health. Moreover, at the same time, car-dependent low-density suburban expansion consequentially is increasing infrastructure investments and maintenance costs demanded by the ever-expanding infrastructure networks, which remain as ‘over-provisions’ disproportionate to the population density. Future consequences of such a pattern of development are to be detrimental to ‘environmental and economic sustainability’ and to be deterrent to development of a compact resilient city with cohesive communities. This paper is firstly re-evaluating Doha’s urban morphological dynamics through a comparative assessment of selected compact and high-density cities around the world. It is secondly attempting to investigate viability of an appropriate possible compact urban form along with identification of appropriate spatial, population and density strategies those would facilitate such a form. Such a compact form should ensure Doha’s future urban sustainability, resilience and liveability during the post oil-gas era by minimizing use of personal cars, optimizing and minimizing infrastructure investments and maintenance costs, opening up new dimensions in place-making and sustainable transportation and by strengthening the communities.
Presenters
AK
Amitabh Kakoty
Senior Urban Planning Specialist, MME Qatar
Initiate Planning principles for Green Transit-oriented Development Using Green Infrastructure as a Core PrincipleView Abstract
Research Paper 02:00 PM - 03:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/11 11:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/11 12:30:00 UTC
The paper establishes a linking framework for green infrastructure (GI) and green transit-oriented development (green TOD), which is the combination of green urbanism principles and transit-oriented development (TOD) principles. Green infrastructure links other infrastructural developments with nature, which is also the role of green TOD. Thus, the first objective of this article is to explore green infrastructure measures and benefits that indicate its involvement in green TOD. The concept of green TOD lacks the planning model to implement it on the ground; Thus, as a second objective, from reviewed literature, this paper will try to develop planning principles to implement green TOD on the ground considering green infrastructure as one element. Finally, the study proposes a green TOD planning strategy for the urban regeneration of the St. Estifanos light rail transit (LRT) neighborhood. The paper advocates green infrastructure benefits based on a green TOD design strategy for environmental sustainability. Keywords: green infrastructure; TOD; green urbanism; green TOD; environmental sustainability; Addis-Ababa
Presenters
SM
Samuel Tsegaye Mosissa
Ph.D. Candidate, Southwest Jiaotong University
Revitalization of Walled City, Case of Udaipur, IndiaView Abstract
Research Paper 02:00 PM - 03:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/11 11:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/11 12:30:00 UTC
Historical city of Udaipur in India is famed for its enthralling allure, welcoming environment, and the fascinating royal heritage. With its picturesque landscape, lakes, and historic significance, Udaipur has been a major tourism destination in the western state of Rajasthan. The city has two distinct areas, a Walled City dominated by the rich cultural, traditional markets, and architectural heritage and the area outside the walled city which is more planned and equipped with modern amenities and facilities. In the recent years, the city has experienced an unprecedented rise of tourism and its allied activities which have been found to be concentrated in the Walled City. There has been a direct impact of this on the increase in commercial activities furthering the increase in traffic and congestion in the not so wide streets and by lanes of the Walled City area. Issues caused due to traffic in tandem with poor and crumbling physical infrastructure is leading to deterioration of the overall environment of this famed city, including the outflow of the residents to the parts of the city with better physical infrastructure. It has been noted by the authors that the traffic congestion in the Walled City has progressively become the major deterrent and has led to influencing the travel and work experiences of not only the residents but also the tourists. With the purpose of devising a strategy for the revitalization of the Walled City, the authors have approached the issue being faced by the Walled City of Udaipur from the lens of transportation management. The study delves on the concept of activity rescheduling and analyses based on livability index within the Walled City area. Further, research identifies various determinants of tourism potential in the Walled City. The proposals made for reviving the Walled City are primarily for the residents as it is understood by the authors that the benefits of the economic activities should be accrued to the locals and as much as possible to those within the Walled City. The intent has been to maintain the unique physical and cultural character blending the traditional with the new age technological solutions. The recommendations made may be applied in similar environs in old city areas in any part of the world by appropriately modifying to suit the local conditions.
Presenters
PB
Prabh Bedi
Director, Resonance Integrated Solutions
Co-authors
PC
Paridhi Choubisa
Director, Inclusive Design And Planning
Cultural heritage in hidden layers: to bound or to unbound? Lessons learnt from the construction of the Athens metro and the in progress line in Thessaloniki (Greece)View Abstract
Case Study Report 02:00 PM - 03:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/11 11:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/11 12:30:00 UTC
Greece is a country with a long and glorious past that is reflected in its rich monumental heritage spread throughout the country and well beyond its territorial seas. However, despite the long list of archaeological sites, new archaeological findings are constantly revealed, usually by accident, when constructions with a need to dig take place (for public works, private buildings etc.). When that occurs, all works stop, for official procedures to take place (inspections, surveys, excavations etc), causing extreme delays but also disappointment to the interested parties. After the 1990s though, a new approach was put to test. Instead of spending years excavating to remove all archaeological items from the site - which until then had been considered the only acceptable practice for their protection and conservation - the Hellenic Ministry of Culture experimented with another option: the in situ conservation and display of antiquities as part of the new use of the space. In the begging, this alternative approach was tested in just a few private constructions but later it was also implemented in an emblematic public (underground) transportation infrastructure: the Athens metro line, that opened to the public just two years before the Olympic Games in 2004. However, in the case of Thessaloniki, where the works for the metro line are still in progress, the Greek state is rather indecisive, reaching contradicting and subversive decisions. This, despite the fact that so far, all the in situ attempts were fully embraced by experts and non-experts (citizens, entrepreneurs, scholars, etc, even by visitors), for contributing to the upgrade of the quality of life and to the production of urban public spaces where place identities and communities are highly connected to their past. The paper presents key information on the shift in Greece towards the in situ approach when hidden archaeological layers are found, in spaces where new uses need to take place. The paper also provides critical observations for Thessaloniki metro line, in which the adopted preservation approach is different than in the case of Athens, raising controversy among interested parties.
Presenters
MP
Marilena Papageorgiou
Assistant Professor, Aristotle University Of Thessaloniki
Environmental Assessment of Urban Rail Transit Station Area Based on TOD Mode —— A Case Study of Ranjiaba Station in ChongqingView Abstract
Research Paper 02:00 PM - 03:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/11 11:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/11 12:30:00 UTC
The concept of transit-oriented development (TOD) was first put forward in the 1980s. As one of the most successful sustainable development models of cities and transportation, TOD is an important way to realize the integration of traffic and land use,promote land use intensification and diversification, and form green traffic leading urban development . As China's national economic development enters the new normal, urban development has entered the transformation stage of high quality development from the past extensive expansion, and the TOD has become an important grasp to realize the transformation of urban high quality development. As an important hub with high development intensity, large population agglomeration and extremely complex transportation in urban rail transit system, rail transit station area can significantly improve the overall operation efficiency of rail system,more effectively promote the comprehensive development and utilization of site regional resources, which has a pivotal position.However, because the construction of urban rail transit system lags behind the development of land use, the site area often lacks the reserved space to match it, which leads to the limited development of the current rail station area. It is difficult to further promote its follow-up high-quality development.In addition, the highly complex ecological and construction conditions of mountain cities and the relatively lack of targeted research in China at present, the vigorous development of mountain urban rail transit system in the future is facing severe challenges. Based on the evaluation tools of geographic information system (GIS), this paper takes the rail transit station site,Ranjiaba station area in the main urban area of Chongqing, as an example, combs the characteristics of land use, spatial connection and functional use material elements in the surrounding block space, and delimits the research scope suitable for the mountain city site area. After that, according to the hierarchical analysis method, the TOD environmental evaluation index system which affects the coordinated development of land use and transportation system in rail transfer station area is constructed from two aspects. The comprehensive development results of Ranjiaba rail station area are analyzed by visualization and quantification, and the environmental characteristics and weak links are summarized. Based on this, this paper puts forward some suggestions on land and traffic optimization which are more suitable for the current TOD mode, in order to provide a certain reference for the integration and utilization of space resources in the surrounding blocks of urban rail transit station.
Presenters Leiyu Fu
Postgraduate, School Of Architecture And Urban Planning Chongqing University
Co-authors
WL
Wen Liu
Chongqing University
Ph.D. candidate
,
Southwest Jiaotong University
Director
,
Resonance Integrated Solutions
Assistant Professor
,
Aristotle University of Thessaloniki
postgraduate
,
School of Architecture and Urban Planning Chongqing University
Associate Professor
,
LABMOB / Federal University of Rio de Janeiro
+ 6 more speakers. View All
ISOCARP - Technical Administrator
Ms Olga Chepelianskaia
Founder and Principal Consultant
,
UNICITI
Dr Nasim Iranmanesh
Architect & PHD in urban planning
,
Islamic azad university of Tehran
Prof Ali Alraouf
Congress Advisor and Professor - ISOCARP Board Member
,
HBKU
Founder
,
DOHA PLANNERS
 Mark David Major
Assistant Professor of Architecture and Urban Planning
,
Qatar University
Architect
,
Ministry of Municipality and Environment
Advisor
,
GIZ
+17 more attendees. View All
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