Track 4: Resilience and adaptability. Al-Waha: promoting glocal solutions Virtual Room 3
Oct 28, 2021 04:00 PM - 06:00 PM(Asia/Qatar)
20211028T1600 20211028T1800 Asia/Qatar Virtual Only | Track 4 | Session 1. Urban transformations for climate adaption

The session is embedded in the healthy city framework and brings papers on cases of urban renewal and revitalization. Authors argue cities need to re-invent themselves to become more sustainable and more resilient. Delivered presentations will discuss and evaluate vulnerability and resilience enhancement strategies for historic centers and postindustrial areas.  

Urban environment calls for comprehensive evaluation analysis of vulnerability and territorial cohesion. As so the sessions aim to evaluate urban development potential based on ecological carrying capacity to introduce optimization strategies. It emphasizes the need of supporting continuous improvement of urban material, environmental, social and economic conditions by improving the urban quality and efficiency in terms of resolving separation of urban functions, low environmental quality, unequal development or insufficient support for urban renewal. 

Virtual Room 3 57th ISOCARP World Planning Congress in Doha, Qatar ajuurinen@xtalks.com

The session is embedded in the healthy city framework and brings papers on cases of urban renewal and revitalization. Authors argue cities need to re-invent themselves to become more sustainable and more resilient. Delivered presentations will discuss and evaluate vulnerability and resilience enhancement strategies for historic centers and postindustrial areas.  

Urban environment calls for comprehensive evaluation analysis of vulnerability and territorial cohesion. As so the sessions aim to evaluate urban development potential based on ecological carrying capacity to introduce optimization strategies. It emphasizes the need of supporting continuous improvement of urban material, environmental, social and economic conditions by improving the urban quality and efficiency in terms of resolving separation of urban functions, low environmental quality, unequal development or insufficient support for urban renewal. 

Vulnerability of the old community Observations from Wuhan, China View Abstract
Research Paper 03:00 PM - 04:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/10/28 12:00:00 UTC - 2021/10/28 13:30:00 UTC
In the post‐COVID‐19 era, it is necessary for cities to increase their level of resilience to cope with unexpected risks. How can they improve their level of resilience? This article will stress research on the most vulnerable units in cities and further identify key vulnerability indicators of these units. The study area is in Wuhan, China, and the research object is the old community. In China, urban governance generally follows the "City – District ‐ Street ‐ Community" model, the "street" is the city's cell, and the community is the basic unit of urban functioning. Meanwhile, grassroots (community) governance is divided into a more fine‐grained pattern: "Community ‐ Sub‐ community ‐ Community grid – Building." Unlike the internationally accepted term "slum," the old community is a specific concept in China. It usually refers to communities with many vulnerable people living in, whose functional decline, structural dilapidation, environmental deterioration, because of the long period since its construction. So, the old community is the most vulnerable part of the community, and its level determines the upper limit of the city's resilience (Cannikin Law). First, this paper systematically reviews the development of Chinese communities after 1949. It classifies old communities into three categories: the street committee system, the danwei system, and the community‐based system. Second, three dimensions of resilience: physical environmental, social environmental, and individual consciousness dimensions, were derived by examining internationally sophisticated resilience assessment methods. Third, the paper observes old communities in Wuhan under these three dimensions, elaborating a series of vulnerability indicators and find out reasons. Besides, data were collected from participant observation, archives, interviews, newspapers, and published reports. This paper aims to provide a reference on how to fundamentally improve cities' resilience levels, namely, to start with their basic units and address the weakest parts.
Presenters
XL
Xiaolin Lao
School Of Architecture And Urban Planning, Huazhong University Of Science And Technology
Assessment of External Spatial Vulnerability of Mountain Cities under Climate Change:Zhao Tong Case Study, ChinaView Abstract
Research Paper 03:00 PM - 04:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/10/28 12:00:00 UTC - 2021/10/28 13:30:00 UTC
The assessment of spatial distribution of urban vulnerability enhances resilience planning. Vulnerability is closely related to resilience. The opposite of vulnerability is resilience, and the stronger the vulnerability is, the weaker the resilience is. As a description of the current situation of urban resilience capacity, the spatial evaluation results of urban vulnerability can provide an important scientific basis for urban disaster prevention and resilient city planning. However, many existing vulnerability assessments are not enough to support resilient planning under the impact of climate change. This paper discusses mountain cities of vulnerability in terms of analysis of human and environmental systems from application of the driver-pressure-state-impact-response (DPSIR) framework. Take Zhaotong, a typical mountainous city in southwest China, as an example. Firstly, defining the main types of natural disasters in the study area, including earthquakes, landslides and floods. Secondly, the method system of natural disaster assessment is constructed. Several indicators are taken into account, such as physical(related to the characteristics of buildings and terrain) and social indicators (related to population and economic income), as well as the accessibility from/to emergency services/hospitals. Indicators were processed by standardization, processed and correlated using the principal components analysis (PCA) and integrated within a Rough Analytical Hierarchy Process. Through the calculation, we can get the zoning of different levels of urban vulnerability. The results showed that the contradiction between human and land in the study area is more prominent, and the vulnerability of an urban center is higher than that of other regions, and the vulnerability of a central region is higher than that of northern and southern regions. Secondly, Zhaotong, as a typical highland mountainous city, is more vulnerable to high disaster risk areas in the urban fringe affected by climate change than other areas, while the areas with high population density and economic activity density have higher vulnerability. Finally, the corresponding elastic planning intervention is applied to the urban spatial units with different vulnerability characteristics. The DPSIR model was used to determine a management strategy to reduce the vulnerability of urban in response to drivers, pressures, states and impacts indicated by modelling. This research provides some implications for disaster mitigation and risk reduction strategies as well. Fund Item: Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China No.:51978050\The Science and Technology Program of Ministry of Housing and Urban-rural Development of the People's Republic of China No.: 2020-k-194
Presenters
KZ
Kaixi ZHAO
Beijing Forestry University
Comprehensive evaluation and dynamic evolution analysis of urban vulnerability of old industrial bases in Heilongjiang Province, ChinaView Abstract
Research Paper 03:00 PM - 04:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/10/28 12:00:00 UTC - 2021/10/28 13:30:00 UTC
Urban vulnerability has always been the main content of urban planning research, and it is an important basis to judge whether urban development is healthy and sustainable.As the largest old industrial base in China, Northeast China has embarked on a development path dominated by heavy industry under the planned economy system. Its industrial structure is not sustainable, and it relies on natural resources for a long time. The ecological environment has been destroyed.The study on urban vulnerability of the old industrial bases in Northeast China is of great significance for the revitalization of the old industrial bases and the promotion of high-quality urban development in China.Taking 13 prefecture-level cities in Heilongjiang Province in northeast China as the research objects, this paper constructs an evaluation index system from four dimensions of ecological environment, resources, society and economy, and analyzes the spatial pattern and dynamic evolution of urban vulnerability from 2010 to 2019 by using entropy method, comprehensive index method and grey correlation degree.The results show that :(1) Spatially, the urban vulnerability pattern of Heilongjiang Province in 2015 showed clustering of high-vulnerability areas, and then the overall urban vulnerability decreased and tended to be evenly distributed.(2) In terms of time, the urban vulnerability of Heilongjiang Province showed an upward trend from 2010 to 2013, and gradually decreased from 2013 to 2019. The resource vulnerability, ecological vulnerability and social vulnerability all decreased steadily, while the economic vulnerability first increased and then decreased.(3) The correlation between urban comprehensive vulnerability and ecological vulnerability in Heilongjiang Province was the highest in 2010, and the correlation between urban vulnerability and economic vulnerability was the highest in 2013-2015, and then the correlation shifted to social vulnerability.In the future, in the process of deepening the revitalization of the old industrial base, Heilongjiang Province should strengthen the construction of economic transformation, optimize the industrial structure, strengthen the construction of ecological civilization, and improve the utilization rate of resources.
Presenters
JY
Jingyuan Yuan
Student, School Of Architecture, Harbin Institute Of Technology; Key Laboratory Of Cold Region Urban And Rural Human Settlement Environment Science And Technology, Ministry Of Industry And Information Technology
Co-authors
YL
Yuze Li
School Of Architecture, Harbin Institute Of Technology; Key Laboratory Of Cold Region Urban And Rural Human Settlement Environment Science And Technology, Ministry Of Industry And Information Technology
晓刘
晓光 刘
No.66, Xidazhi Street, Nangang District, Harbin City, Heilongjiang Province, China 150006, School Of Architecture, Harbin Institute Of Technology; Key Laboratory Of Cold Region Urban And Rural Human Settlement Environment Science And Technology, Ministry Of Industry And Information Technology
Technical rationality or public value ?—— Rethinking China's urban renewal and urban design under the background of post-industrializationView Abstract
Research Paper 03:00 PM - 04:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/10/28 12:00:00 UTC - 2021/10/28 13:30:00 UTC
Just as the development process the developed countries have experienced, during the globalization and rapid economic development, a large number of developing countries have gradually transited from agricultural society to industrial society and then to post-industrial society. However, while experiencing rapid and significant urbanization, many cities in developing countries, especially in those with huge population and better economy, have gradually encountered a large number of urban problems both in material and non-material aspects, some similar to what happened in developed countries, while showing their own unique and special characteristics. Under the influence of COVID-19 and the uncertainty of global development, such problems become further worsened and urgently need to be addresed and adjusted through urban renewal, so as to promote sustainable development. Recently, urban renewal plans have been put forward by the Chinese government as an important national policy, demonstrating the development pressure faced by cities in developing countries represented by China. Facilitated by the current trend of interdisciplinary research, urban science and modern urban planning technology have made great progress, with outstanding advantages achieved in dealing with such complex problems as multi-level and multi-dimensional urban space. These achievements promote the urban spatial development and renewal design scientifically and prospectively. However, with the rapid development of technological rationality, regional differences and spatial characteristics of cities are assimilated by the abstract and regular planning technology. For example, regional culture, social network and residents' preferences have not been fully explored. In particular, quite a few developing countries have failed to adopt and apply modern planning theories and technologies based on their own regional culture characteristics, politics-economy systems, ecological environments and demographic characteristics. As a result, not only the effectiveness of cutting-edge planning technology is not well delivered, but also the problems with urban development have not been properly solved, some even becoming intensified. Based on the review of the literature on urban renewal research and related urban technology application in developed countries’ cities, this study expounds the development process, institutional change and technological growth of urban renewal in China over the past 50 years or so, especially after 1978. Furthermore, through comparing and analyzing the differences between China and many developed countries in terms of the related problems, this study provides some solutions and implementation results in the process of urban renewal, as well as the opportunities and challenges faced by China's urban renewal and urban design in the future. Its main conclusion is: in the post-industrial era, developing countries should establish their cultural self-confidence, while making full use of their own characteristics and advantages in the fields of politics-economy institutions, urban space and local cultures. It is quite important to deeply integrate the technological rationality with the public value, so that the technological rationality would not only serve the renewal of material space, but also boost the realization of regional public value, so as to formulate a more innovative, inclusive and regional urban space development strategy and break through the current development bottlenecks. This study is of great significance for China and many other developing countries.
Presenters
BQ
BING QU
School Of Architecture, Southeast University
Co-authors
JM
JIE MA
School Of Architecture, Southeast University
Research on optimization strategy of shanghai industrial heritage protection and reuse based on multi-source data ——Take shanghai creative industry park as exampleView Abstract
Research Paper 03:00 PM - 04:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/10/28 12:00:00 UTC - 2021/10/28 13:30:00 UTC
When society changes from a productive society and an industrialized society to a consumer society and a post-industrialized society, cultural consumption has become its main feature, and urban space has also changed from a consumer of wealth to a creator of wealth. The process of post-modernization and post-industrialization will inevitably cause the industrial heritage and other historical buildings in the inner city area to break away from industrialization, and rejuvenate these industrial buildings with extremely high social and historical and cultural values. In the 1960-1970s, the great success of the industrial heritage transformation in SoHo, the Docklands of London and the Ruhr Industrial Zone in Germany was the combination of urban industrial heritage protection and cultural industries, so it became global Set off an upsurge in the protection and reuse of industrial heritage in the cultural and creative industry park model. However, how to evaluate the quality of the industrial heritage transformed under this model from a subjective and objective perspective after the use of the built environment is a topic that few people pay attention to. Shanghai is the earliest and the most important industrial city. The industrial heritage left over from the transformation of urban functions is extremely rich, and it is an important content of Shanghai's urban culture and urban tourism research. Shanghai's industrial heritage protection and creative industry development and combined development are at the forefront of the country. Research and evaluation of the industrial heritage protection and transformation of creative industrialization is of great significance, and excellent transformation methods can be promoted. At present, the method of evaluating the built environment in the world is mainly the post-use evaluation (POE) of the built environment proposed by Western countries in the 1960s. It is mainly used in the evaluation of building performance. After evolution and promotion, it is also used in urban public spaces, parks, campuses, etc. Place to be applied. Since the 21st century, Zhu Xiaolei and Wu Shuoxian (2002) have introduced this method to China and formed a normative system to elaborate on the post-use evaluation of the built environment from the technical, functional, and behavioral levels. Han Jing. Hu Shaoxue (2005) pointed out the key issues behind the urban development of China's construction industry, especially the background data of urban renewal. The domestic post-reconstruction evaluation of the industrial heritage creative industry gardening mainly focuses on the developer level of policies, development models, and transformation methods, and focuses on qualitative evaluation research on the introduction of concepts and advanced domestic and foreign operation methods. Few researchers have conducted qualitative and quantitative research evaluations on industrial heritage creative industrialization and reuse from an objective perspective combined with a user's subjective perspective. Therefore, this article selects the excellent transformation cases from the transformation of Shanghai's industrial heritage into a creative industrial park, and mainly uses the subjective evaluation method of the built environment post-use evaluation method (POE) to conduct research on the transformation of Shanghai's industrial heritage; combined with an objective perspective , Use Baidu POI, big data analysis, field surveys, field questionnaires and other methods to evaluate the status quo transformation strategy from the park function, format, physical space environment (roads, buildings, environment, etc.), and use space syntax to optimize the transformation strategies recommendation . Summarize the transformation strategies and propose optimization strategies, with a view to providing constructive strategies for the future transformation of industrial heritage and perfecting the industrial heritage evaluation and protection strategy system. Keywords: Shanghai industrial heritage protection and reuse, cultural and creative industry park, POE evaluation method, space syntax
Presenters Sen Xia
Assistant Planner, Shanghai Tongji Urban Planning And Design Institute Co., Ltd.
An Analysis of Urban Development Potential Based on Ecological Carrying CapacityView Abstract
Research Paper 03:00 PM - 04:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/10/28 12:00:00 UTC - 2021/10/28 13:30:00 UTC
Abstract: The study of urban development potential is an exploration of the future development of a city, a forecast based on the evaluation of the current state of development of the city. The study of urban development potential is one of the important components of the theoretical system of sustainable development. Ecological carrying capacity is one of the difficult, key and hot spots of ecological research, and is one of the supporting theories of sustainable development. The study of ecological carrying capacity is not only of great significance to the development of ecology, but also has very important practical significance to the exploration of sustainable development theory. Based on the ecological carrying capacity and with the aim of sustainable development, this paper makes a preliminary comprehensive study on the evaluation system of urban development potential based on ecological carrying capacity by establishing the coupling mechanism of ecological carrying capacity and urban development potential. The specific contents include: 1. On the basis of sorting out the research and practice dynamics of ecological carrying capacity and urban development potential, briefly summarises the main problems existing in the current research on ecological carrying capacity and urban development potential, and clarifies that resources and environmental factors are the key components of urban development potential research. 2.Based on this, this paper examines and analyses the relationship between ecological carrying capacity and urban development potential (including external relationship and internal relationship) by establishing a coupling mechanism linking ecological carrying capacity and urban development potential, and examines and analyses the relationship between the two (including external relationship and internal relationship) from the aspects of concept, connotation, evaluation method and index system, and clarifies that ecological carrying capacity is the basis of urban development potential, and ecological carrying capacity and urban It is clear that ecological carrying capacity is the basis of urban development potential, and ecological carrying capacity and urban development potential are closely interdependent. 3. The method of evaluating urban development potential based on ecological carrying capacity is systematically explored, and an evaluation system of urban development potential based on ecological carrying capacity is constructed from four aspects: resource carrying potential, environmental carrying capacity, human support potential and socio-economic development potential. 4. The full study is summarized and further work directions are briefly discussed. Citations: Zhao Dongsheng and Guo Cailan. Advances in ecological carrying capacity research. Journal of Ecology. 2019(2):399-410 Zhang Linbo. Research on the theory and method of ecological carrying capacity of cities--Shenzhen as an example. Beijing: China Environmental Science Press, 2009 Roldan Muradian. Immigration and the environment: Underlying values and scope of analysis .Ecological Economics. 2006, Vol 59(2). 208~213
Presenters
MW
Mingming Wang
Shanghai Tongji Urban Planning & Design Institute Co., Ltd.
Feasibility study on the construction of skyway in commercial center of typical extreme cold cities in ChinaView Abstract
Research Paper 03:00 PM - 04:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/10/28 12:00:00 UTC - 2021/10/28 13:30:00 UTC
Abstract: Cold weather greatly reduces willingness and comfort of urban residents, especially in pedestrian experience and business vitality, which has brought negative impacts on cities in the extreme cold region. Urban construction in China has characterized with wide roads and huge blocks. One of the urgent problems in planning and construction of cold cities in China is how to build skyways with climate protection function in the central areas of typical extreme cold cities in China. This paper takes Minneapolis of the USA and Harbin of China as typical cases in the cold regions. Based on Arcgis10.4 platform, this paper analyzes open data such as OpenStreetMap and POI, and expounds the typical characteristics of the air corridor system construction from two aspects of the urban external space support and the land use support. In the aspect of the urban external space support of the city, the comparative analysis is carried out from three dimensions, namely, the macro, the meso and the micro scale, including the building density, the space between the building Street walls, the corridor length and the connection form. In the aspect of land use support, the paper makes a comparative analysis from the aspects of the functional relationship between blocks and the degree of land use mix. This study reveals the characteristics of the outer space and land use function suitable for the construction of skyway, and draws the suitability evaluation of the air corridor system construction in the eight commercial centers in Harbin, scopes the suitable area for the construction of the skyway, and determines the preliminary plan of the planning and construction. The purpose is to promote the pedestrian friendly and enhance the vitality of commercial center in extreme cold cities.
Presenters WANQING SU
Harbin Institute Of Technology (HIT)
Co-authors
RC
Rui Chen
Harbin Institute Of Technology
ZZ
Ziran Zhang
Harbin Institute Of Technology
ZZ
Zhichong Zou
Harbin Institute Of Technology (HIT)
Architectural Value and Urban Metabolism and the post-oil city as transition to what comes after.View Abstract
Research Paper 03:00 PM - 04:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/10/28 12:00:00 UTC - 2021/10/28 13:30:00 UTC
This paper contributes to the evolving urban environment, which the city commonly represents, through understanding the post-oil period as transitional toward a new paradigm by utilizing architectural value to reshape urban metabolism. Green deals are shown to have responsibility as threshold events for transformational change toward a cooperative whole of urban elements beyond post-oil city urbanity. The purpose of this paper is to contribute to evolving the urban environment, which the city represents, through understanding the current period as transitional. This paper interweaves post-oil transition, the urbanity of the city, and architectural value and the practice of its provision. It describes a transformational moment enabled by the ‘post-oil’ period, whereby ‘post-oil’ is understood as counter to the use of oil and not the period that will follow. The end of mineral oil energy and material indicates such a change, which climate change, biosphere collapse and the vulnerability that the Covid pandemic signal to us. City is proposed as an intensity of urbanity, while urbanity extends around the globe. Supplying the city with resources extends over the horizon, deep into the ocean and perhaps soon into space. The web of urban connectivity is global, but the character, depth and breadth of non-city urban is often not considered. The words ‘city’ and ‘urban’ are commonly used interchangeably, tacitly opposing urbanity-as-city to the rest of the world. All the land, nature and its life is urbanized through technological valuation as quantification and narrowly appropriated qualities; the urban is ubiquitous state of dwelling in the world. This ubiquitous state is based on parameters that do not comprehend what cannot be asked as a scientific question. What cannot be addressed becomes exterior to, or concealed in, our culture. Urbanity is part of this thinking. Nature’s reality eludes the technological urban-encoded landscape. The unspoken, un-integrated and concealed aspects of world include almost everything that makes us human, such as questioning nature’s not-systems and purpose, the source and nature life, love, consciousness and its purpose. Architecture was part of humanity long before our present machine ages mineral hydrocarbon and electricity based economy. Today's technology has evolved from its antecedent forms and must continue to evolve. Conceptual project-based thinking of architectural practice and the provision of architectural value, informing any scale in the world-as-urban, comprehends the limit of technological urbanism. This paper engages the ‘Understanding Urban Metabolism’ track’s terms of approach to support “continuous improvement of urban material, environmental, social and economic conditions” by “leveraging improving the urban quality and efficiency” in terms of resolving: “separation of urban functions (1), low environmental quality (2) , unequal development (3) or insufficient support for urban renewal (4)”. Accepting the possibility of a future after-technological transformation, we develop these 4 elements to express leveraging cities’ “metabolic quality and efficiency” in terms of architectural value, developing them as an architectural project to form a path toward well being of human conscious aspiration beyond mere health and psychological wellness. Human being is essentially without limits. We question what that means with an range of practical approaches in philosophy, architecture, planning, and spirituality in its positive sense of wonder. This paper concludes how the post-oil transitional city is potential as the cooperative whole of city elements (1); defining high quality as architectural value that translates acquisitive quantified economic value to architectural value that gives measure to well being (2); to support socially integrated purpose, (3); for investment in urban environments (4).
Presenters Michael Karassowitsch
Professor, VIT Vellore School Of Planning And Architecture
Postpandemic Dubrovnik – Degrowth ScenarioView Abstract
Research Paper 03:00 PM - 04:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/10/28 12:00:00 UTC - 2021/10/28 13:30:00 UTC
Together with Venice, Dubrovnik represent the emblematic city losing all its functions due to overtourism, including the outstanding universal value which placed them on the UNESCO list. Reports on the UNESCO/ICOMOS Reactive Monitoring Mission to the Old City of Dubrovnik evolves around the central issue of the excessive tourist growth and the need to manage it. Venice management plan was drafted in the prepandemic times, while Dubrovnik’s during the pandemic with the implementation period in post-pandemic era. The restoration of the living city, protected in 1979 with its outstanding universal value, is closely linked with the ideas of degrowth scenario. The standard overtourism diagnosis of the historic centre affected on exodus of the local population, increased costs of living, gentrification, strong dependency of the local economy on the one sector, frequent traffic congestions, increased quantities of waste and endangering public green areas. According to the previous research, increasing development pressure in Dubrovnik has led to disappearance of green zones which are important for mitigating the consequence of climate change. COVID-19 pandemic caused dramatic decline in the number of visitors as a consequence of reduced number of flights and shipping lines as well as imposed social distancing measures, consequently affecting life quality in the historic centre and causing complete collapse of the local economic system. The COVID-19 crisis represents an opportunity to create a completely new development vision of the City focused on degrowth scenario. Could transitioning toward urban degrowth be the adequate response to pandemic aftermath? Could new urban development strategy foster the resilience to the consequences of climate change? The aim of this paper is to look at the current theoretical outline of degrowth in urbanism and local economic development and to explore the possibilities and limitation in the specific institutional outline. The results of this research will offer an insight on how specific European cities, which have undergone similar transformation from overtourism to undertourism, could start to re-invent themselves to become more sustainable and more resilient. References: D'Alisa, G., Demaria, F., & Kallis, G. (Eds.). (2014). Degrowth: A Vocabulary for a New Era (1st ed.). Routledge. Ferreira, A., & von Schönfeld, K. (2020). Interlacing planning and degrowth scholarship: A manifesto for an interdisciplinary alliance. DISP, 56(1), 53-64. Fletcher, R., Murray Mas, I., Blanco-Romero, A., & Blázquez-Salom, M. (2019). Tourism and degrowth: an emerging agenda for research and praxis. Journal of Sustainable Tourism, 27(12), 1745-1763. Panayiotopoulos, A and Pisano, C (2019). Overtourism dystopias and socialist utopias: Towards an urban armature for Dubrovnik. Tourism Planning and Development, 16 (4). 393-410. Victor, P. A. (2012). Growth, degrowth and climate change: A scenario analysis. Ecological economics, 84, 206-212.
Presenters
PM
Paola Marinović
Junior Consultant, Urbanex D.o.o.
Co-authors
IK
Ivana Katurić
CEO, Urbanex
MG
Mario Gregar
Consultant, Urbanex D.o.o.
Modelling the development of the Šibenik Urban Area (Croatia) according to the objectives of European green policiesView Abstract
Research Paper 03:00 PM - 04:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/10/28 12:00:00 UTC - 2021/10/28 13:30:00 UTC
The Regional Development Act of the Republic of Croatia introduced the concept of urban areas, which cover larger cities in Croatia together with their urbanized surroundings. Urban areas are set up for the purpose of more efficient planning, harmonisation and implementation of regional development policies, which are in line with the regional development policies of the European Union. Urban areas are beneficiaries of ITI mechanism funds, which aims to enhance territorial cohesion and strategic development of urban areas. Šibenik is a city with 34,000 inhabitants in whose urban area live approx. 50,000 people. Located on the coast of the Adriatic Sea, the urban area includes several smaller and less populated islands, a narrow urbanized and touristificated coastal zone and a vast but sparsely populated rural hinterland on karst terrain. During the 1990s, part of the area was hit by war destruction, and after the end of the war, the area was marked by a process of deindustrialization and a strong touristification. Demographic trends are favourable only in the narrower coastal zone around the city of Šibenik, which is the only area of the urban area of Šibenik where the population is growing at the moment. There is also a high construction of space. The island part and hinterland are experiencing demographic depression at the same time. As a result, some settlements are losing its social functions. The global COVID-19 pandemic, in which tourism was one of the most affected activities, is the right time to adopt new principles for the development of this area. The aim of this paper is to create an overview of the new comprehensive model of development of the Šibenik urban area, the foundation of which are the strategic principles of the European Green Deal, according to which this development will be directed to make the space more sustainable and resilient to risks and global fluctuations. The first part of the paper aims to explain the national and European approach to green urban renewal and the green transition towards a sustainable and resilient urban area. The second part of the paper briefly analyses the main components of the development of the urban area of Šibenik so far with the aim of identifying specific urban zones that need a strategic approach to future green development. This uses relevant quantitative data from statistical sources, as well as qualitative data collected from local development stakeholders through semi-structured interviews. The result of this analysis is the creation of strategic zones within the urban area, depending on the development potentials and challenges of the area. Based on these data, the scenario for the development of the urban area of Šibenik is defined, valorising the European strategic determinants of the European Green Deal. The focus is on the application of the green development principle defined by the EU, in particular on decarbonisation and circular space management, green infrastructure, as well as on the development of farm-to-fork agriculture and on blue development. In this way, a clear vision of the future development of the urban area of Šibenik is created, the consistent application of which should lead to demographic revitalization, economic diversification, as well as green, sustainable and resilient development of this urban area. The application of such a principle of research and strategic planning of space in strategic planning could be applicable for the development of similar areas, especially in the Mediterranean part of Europe.
Presenters
IK
Ivana Katurić
CEO, Urbanex
Ivan Šišak
Junior Consultant, Urbanex D.o.o.
Co-authors
MG
Mario Gregar
Consultant, Urbanex D.o.o.
Rethinking on Urban White Areas in high-density city under Healthy City frameworkView Abstract
Research Paper 03:00 PM - 04:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/10/28 12:00:00 UTC - 2021/10/28 13:30:00 UTC
Urban White Areas(UWAs) are areas with flexibility and multi-functions, as opposed to traditional definite approach of urban planning management. Extant studies on UWAs often focus on functional compatibility in land use management. This article,based on empirical study of Guangzhou, a high-density city in southern China, draws attention to UWAs’ significant role in city active health management, especially after COVID-19 pandemic.This article summarizes significance and necessity of UWAs by highlighting the facts and problems in Guangzhou during the pandemic. This analysis also indicates that the emphasis of Healthy City has already shifted from ‘passive health management’-focus on hospitalization development to ‘active health management’-focus on preventive and adaptive strategies.In light of this, multi-scale UWAs should be integrated into urban planning system.In the scale of citywide,while Guangzhou Territorial Spatial Comprehensive Planning is being made, Strategic Urban White Areas(SUWAs)are deliberately embedded into the planning layout.Guangzhou has made great efforts to preserving ecological corridors since 2000, which reserves ‘empty’space for SUWAs Planning. The site selection criteria, size and configuration standards and functional uses compatible with both peace and epidemic time are three key factors in SUWAs Planning.In the scale of community,a great number of underutilized spaces are revitalized as UWAs.By summing up two practical cases in Guangzhou, innovative design ideas and public participation are crucial to the success in revitalization process.With the introduction of UWAs,challenges have also been placed on land use management.Innovative management approach is needed to suit the new changes.
Presenters
DZ
Dailin Zhou
Department Chief Planner, Guangzhou Urban Planning Design & Survey Research Institute
Co-authors
YL
Yunya Liu
Guangzhou Urban Planning Design & Survey Research Institute
JH
Jiapei Hu
Guangzhou Urban Planning Design & Survey Research Institute
School of Architecture and Urban Planning, Huazhong University of Science and Technology
Beijing Forestry University
Student
,
School of Architecture, Harbin Institute of Technology; Key Laboratory of Cold Region Urban and Rural Human Settlement Environment Science and Technology, Ministry of Industry and Information Technology
School of Architecture, Southeast University
Assistant planner
,
Shanghai Tongji Urban Planning and Design Institute Co., Ltd.
+ 6 more speakers. View All
ISOCARP - Technical Administrator
Mr Pedro Garcia
professeur agrégé
,
Université Laval
 Hanna Obracht-Prondzyńska
Assistant Professor
,
University of Gdańsk
Associate Professor
,
School of Architecture, Harbin Institute of Technology, Key Laboratory of Cold Region Urban and Rural Human Settlement Environment Science and Technology, Ministry of Industry and Information Technology
PhD student
,
Harbin Institute of Technology (HIT)
Ms Ananya Sethi
Senior Architect
,
Better Habitat Foundation
Mrs LORENA SUTEU
SENIOR MASTER PLANNER
,
Qatar Free Zones Authority
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