Track 5: Uniqueness and connectivity. Al-Baraha: unlocking urban futures Virtual Room 3
Oct 29, 2021 12:00 Noon - 01:30 PM(Asia/Qatar)
20211029T1200 20211029T1330 Asia/Qatar Virtual Only | Track 5 | Session 1. Transdisciplinary approaches and knowledge for unique places

Online session dedicated to transdisciplinary approaches and studies to improve the connectivity and the uniqueness of places. Knowledge from various fields and disciplines can be put together to shape more sustainable and resilient cities at different scales. Contributions will focus on different topics with a holistic perspective, including local tourism, temporary uses and nature in all its elements (including water, animals and the colors of plants in cities). The spaces around urban infrastructures are also worthy to be considered and sometimes protected, including urban underground complexes, areas under bridges and along railroads. In addition, the session will also reflect on elements of spirituality and heritage which can contribute to generate unique places.  

Virtual Room 3 57th ISOCARP World Planning Congress in Doha, Qatar ajuurinen@xtalks.com

Online session dedicated to transdisciplinary approaches and studies to improve the connectivity and the uniqueness of places. Knowledge from various fields and disciplines can be put together to shape more sustainable and resilient cities at different scales. Contributions will focus on different topics with a holistic perspective, including local tourism, temporary uses and nature in all its elements (including water, animals and the colors of plants in cities). The spaces around urban infrastructures are also worthy to be considered and sometimes protected, including urban underground complexes, areas under bridges and along railroads. In addition, the session will also reflect on elements of spirituality and heritage which can contribute to generate unique places.  

Toward Sustainability of Temporary Uses in Public Spaces: a Case Study Muscat, Sultanate of OmanView Abstract
Research Paper 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/10/29 08:00:00 UTC - 2021/10/29 09:30:00 UTC
Purpose With the recently increasing emphasis on sustainable planning and the connection between public values and environmental, social, and economic aspects, there is a need to study temporary uses in public spaces. They are significant ways for achieving sustainability in urban development, especially when users meet their needs by interacting with public spaces in ways that differ from their original uses under changeable circumstances. Cultural heritage and ecological diversity constitute the main catalysts of modern development in Oman. Local authorities of Muscat, Oman’s capital, examine the urban potential and future development through integrating temporary uses to promote public spaces during numerous festivals. This paper investigates how these temporary uses can achieve sustainability and help in urban development. Design/methodology/approach This paper analyzes the environmental, economic, social, legal, and sustainable aspects of temporary uses. Furthermore, two public festivals, held in Muscat, were analyzed as varieties of temporary uses were introduced within public spaces. The analysis of the two cases has been done based on the different aspects of temporary uses. In total, 83 semi-structured interviews were conducted with users and stakeholders such as architects, developers, and planners, during group workshops. A questionnaire was administered to the workshop participants to measure their opinions regarding the temporary uses in public spaces. Findings The study establishes the significance of following the different aspects of temporary uses that can lead to the success of these uses. As well, the subsequent data report that a high percentage of respondents strongly agreed to the positive impacts of temporary uses on urban development in a changeable world. Originality/value This paper’s originality pertains to the exploration of the major role for temporary uses in the urban development of cities as it works like living labs for experimenting before long-term investments to achieve social needs with saving the environment via appropriate investments under an adequate legal framework.
Presenters Mohamed Ali Mohamed Khalil
Assistant Professor Of Architecture, Scientific College Of Design & Mansoura University
Co-authors Eman Hanye Mohamed Nasr
Assistant Professor Of Architecture, Mansoura University
Integrated Planning Regions in Trinidad and Tobago: A Strategic Spatial Planning ExperimentView Abstract
Research Paper 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/10/29 08:00:00 UTC - 2021/10/29 09:30:00 UTC
Spatial planning in Trinidad and Tobago is organized in a three tier hierarchical framework where the national level functions in a purely strategic role, the municipal tier is a mix of strategic and project led initiatives under multiple thematic areas, and the third has a distinctly site-specific regulatory role. The intention is that there is coherence and alignment in strategy moving down each level in scale, and that this is made visible in local design forms. The National Spatial Development Strategy (NSDS) completed in 2013, sets out a strategy of harmonised regional development, outlining sectoral policy priorities, the actions needed to implement these and integrated planning regions (IPRs), a new planning instrument to facilitate delivery of national policies at the lower levels. IPRs are sub-national planning zones that traverse the boundaries of existing municipal planning regions, covering areas identified as having strategic economic development potential and/or requiring revitalisation. They are neither accompanied by new administrative structures, nor do they function as service area boundaries. Instead, they provide a new spatial framework which facilitates horizontal and vertical synergies in planning and implementation, clearing some of the obstacles which have hindered working across hard boundaries. As a spatialization of economic development policy IPRs can be thought of as informal planning arenas (Allmendinger and Haughton, 2010). These soft spaces can be new scales in planning to fill gaps (Olesen, 2012) or act as a bridging mechanism between scales. However, to fulfill their role in reshaping areas IPRs must be flexible, yet robust enough to establish a meaningful dialogue with the requirements of local development. The future spatial development of Trinidad and Tobago is directly linked to development trends that have transformed the space thus far, the ability of planning policies to communicate and choreograph spatial directives, and key challenges that lie ahead. Since the adoption of the NSDS in 2013, global agendas such as the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and the New Urban Agenda as well as the local Vision 2030, National Development Strategy of Trinidad and Tobago 2016-2030, have emerged as highly relevant for reshaping policy in response to both recurring and new challenges. As a vulnerable small island developing state (SIDS), changing demographics, an influx of migrants from neighbouring Venezuela, the intensifying effects of climate change, and increasing imbalances between places are just some of the issues to be addressed in an ever evolving planning landscape. Against this background, this research evaluates the function and relevance of the IPR as a policy instrument. It also investigates the fitness of IPRs to support the existing planning framework in responding to the changing societal and policy context. Using a mix of document analysis and interviews with policy makers and regulators, the discussion begins with an examination of IPRs as a ‘rescaling experiment’ containing discursive elements and underlain by political goals (Davoudi and Brooks, 2021). The paper then discusses whether IPRs can influence behaviour within development processes, and what legitimises a scale of spatial policy. Reflecting on the value of multi-scalar approaches to spatial planning, the possibilities for IPRs to bridge the gap between nationally defined strategic priorities and the design and development of sustainable cities, towns and communities are explored. References Allmendinger, Phil, Haughton, Graham (2012). "Post-political Spatial Planning in England: A crisis of consensus?" Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers 37:1, 89-103. Davoudi, Simin, Brooks, Elizabeth (2021). “City-regional imaginaries and politics of rescaling.” Regional Studies 55:1, 52-62. Olesen, Kristian (2012). “Soft spaces as vehicles for neoliberal transformations of strategic spatial planning?” Environment and Planning C: Government and Policy 30, 910-923.
Presenters Sarah Mahadeo
Student Of The Advanced Master In Sustainable Blue Growth (online), University Of Trieste
Co-authors
RS
Renelle Sarjeant
Urban Planning And Design Researcher And Consultant, Public Space Global
The imperceptible stakeholders- Including the natural world within the urban realmView Abstract
Research Paper 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/10/29 08:00:00 UTC - 2021/10/29 09:30:00 UTC
Urban animals are an integral part of the Indian society, both culturally and religiously. The natural world sustains us and the non-human species play a critical role in its wellbeing. Yet the development models for our cities have always ignored these ever present ‘imperceptible stakeholders’ and have prioritized economy over sustainability. This has resulted in global issues like climate change and loss of ecological diversity. Quenching the thirst or hunger of people and animals is considered to be an essential deed and is widely celebrated in many parts of India. From our festivals to the daily rituals, the idea of mutualism has always existed. In an ever transforming and evolving society, it is critical to hold on to the values that helps us sustain our planet. Each and every living being deserves clean and accessible water, food and shelter. The coexistence of the human and natural worlds is what many of the sustainable development goals (SDG) set up by the United Nations (UN) point us to achieve, for a better future of the planet. As urban practitioners, we seldom plan and design for the ‘imperceptible stakeholders’ who are fundamental to the everyday life of our societies. It is critical for us to work with the nature and to be more accommodating of it within our cities. Jaipur, the first planned city of India, by its design had included nature as a strong part of its urban realm. Higher rates of unplanned urbanization since the 1990s has led the city to sprawl manifolds. The urban densities have increased by 41% and the natural greens are reduced by 27%. This new growth has created many conflicts in between the humans and the non-humans. But at the same time the urban animals, trees and other non-human species are loved and even worshipped by the people. This research analyses these strong cultural roots that ties humans with nature. The aim is to come up with a replicable urban design policy framework and guidelines that can help create sustainable and inclusive urban environments. This is done by developing an informed contemporary understanding of the socio-ecological systems of the city of Jaipur. Strategies are formed at city level, locality level and for the urban fringes. The framework proposes inclusion of urban forest corridor networks housing urban animals which also creates an open space structure by linking various low-income group communities to their workplaces. Animal welfare centers are to become a part of the mandatory social infrastructure. The urban fringes are to provide sanctuaries for the stray urban animals who will also help to create healthy forests by fertilizing the soil. New cultural roots can be generated by making the non-human life also visible within the public realm. By understanding our interdependencies with the natural world, we can create cities where the imperceptible stakeholders of today can be the legal citizens of tomorrow. Keywords- Urban animals, urban forests, ecosystem services, socio-ecological systems, sustainable development goals
Presenters Rudra Sharma
Alumnus, School Of Planning And Architecture , New Delhi
Renaissance of small ancient cities: practical experience of local comprehensive tourism planning in ChinaView Abstract
Case Study Report 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/10/29 08:00:00 UTC - 2021/10/29 09:30:00 UTC
The decline and revival of the ancient city is a constant topic. In recent decades, Chinese urban planning scholars had paid more and more attention to the protection, activation and utilization of historical sites, emphasizing the authenticity development of ancient cities. These ideas have been fully reflected in the practice of restoration and development of Lijiang, Pingyao and other large ancient cities. However, China also has a large number of small ancient cities, which are scattered in different parts of the country. Due to the closer connection with the life of local residents and improper development management, there are a lot of problems in the environmental quality, cultural style, management and maintenance and vitality experience of these ancient cities. Promoting the revival of small ancient cities can not only activate the local economy and vitality, but also better meet the growing demand for short-distance tourism in China, and it is also conducive to the display and publicity of characteristic culture. Therefore, using the systematic current situation evaluation and prediction analysis method, this study constructs a planning research and judgment framework suitable for the development of small ancient cities, and discusses a practical case in the southeast coast of China. This paper puts forward an innovative idea of tourism planning to meet the complex development needs of small ancient cities. The planning framework includes the analysis of tourism market and competitive products from the external perspective, as well as the macro, meso and micro tourism resources and support system analysis and planning decision-making from the internal perspective. The analysis from the external perspective can provide important market information for tourism planning and decision-making, and support the scale allocation of tourism development factors. The internal elements are the use of descriptive statistics, spatial pattern, prediction of evolution and other analysis methods, through the systematic analysis of transportation, cultural tourism resources, climate and meteorology, ecological landscape, to clarify the current situation and possible future problems. Finally, the two parts are integrated, focusing on the protection and vitality stimulation of the original atmosphere in the revitalization of the ancient city, organically constructing and positioning the industrial elements of tourism development, and providing planning guidance for tourism environment and activities. Chongwu ancient city, a small coastal sample of Fujian Province in Ming Dynasty, is benefiting from such local practice. The author carried out comprehensive tourism promotion planning for Chongwu ancient city scenic area and gudu wharf area. Although the spatial scope of the planning does not cover the entire administrative area of Chongwu town, the planning still expands the spatial scale to a larger scope, which is conducive to the formulation of more reasonable planning measures. Based on the systematic, multi-scale and multi-element analysis and simulation prediction, the planning puts forward the strategies of tourism linkage inside and outside the ancient city, regional tourism and local traffic organization, function refinement and optimization, as well as the organic integration of cultural elements and activities. At present, the construction of the ancient city has achieved positive results, the number of tourists and the satisfaction of local residents have been improved to a certain extent. This is a positive experience of China's local comprehensive tourism planning, which effectively balances the protection and development of small ancient cities, and is worth sharing and reference.
Presenters
DY
Dan Ye
Tongji University
Co-authors
YY
Yidong Yu
Shanghai Tongji Urban Planning & Design Institute Co. Ltd.
JZ
Jingmei Zhai
School Of Architecture And Urban Planning, Shenyang Jianzhu University
Improving the sense of citizens’ happiness in cold regions during the COVID-19 pandemic blockade through plant color planning — Taking the Harbin Institute of Technology Community as an example. View Abstract
Research Paper 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/10/29 08:00:00 UTC - 2021/10/29 09:30:00 UTC
Harbin is one of the earliest China's cities that conducted color planning. Due to the influence of the cold geographical environment and the culture of immigrants, the urban color has become a cultural phenomenon deeply rooted in the hearts of the local people. Harbin, as one of the most famous gateway cities in China's "One Belt One Road" project, its position in Asia is becoming more and more important. Compared with international metropolises with excellent color planning such as Turin and Paris, Harbin has the potential to develop into a similar city, thererfore research on color planning in Harbin requires greater attention. In particular, Harbin was the center of the pandemic in the first half of 2020 in China. During the lockdown phase of the COVID-19, Plant color landscape was the most common view outside the community window. People had a deeper understanding of the creation of its color atmosphere. In addition, for most of the communities in cold regions such as the Harbin Institute of Technology (HIT) Community, the optimization of the color landscape is essential to improve the sense of the indoor happiness of the residents in the university (especially during the lockdown period due to the pandemic). Although plants are an important part of the sustainable color creation of the community environment, the current researches mostly start from architectural colors and less on plant colors. This article takes the plant landscape in the entrance area of HIT Community as the research object, draws on the perspective of resources dual-evaluation, and comprehensively evaluates the feasibility and necessity of the Community's plant color planning from the perspective of the supply and demand of Community plant colors. On the plant color supply side: select colorful flora that is well adapted to the climate environment of Harbin, use the AHP method to comprehensively evaluate its aesthetics, ecology, impact on residents’ feelings and culture. The color plant clusters with higher scores are selected as the plant resources for color planning. On the demand-side: through the investigation of the plants’ color in the entrance area of the college, it is found that the current campus plant color creation still has the following problems: 1.There is no comprehensive consideration mechanism for the color characteristics of campus community plants; 2. The color plant varieties are less used, the color is relatively single, the style is dark, and the color system is not rich enough; 3. The color landscape management is extensive, the overall effect is not satisfactory, 4. The planting of plants has less consideration for the health and emotional well-being of residents, and there is an urgent need for plant color planning. In the end, this article combines the campus landscape improvement project of HIT Community. Innovatively, use the subject control method to optimize the plant color landscape, improve the recovery effect of plant color landscape on the well-being of the residents in cold regions. It verified the feasibility of plant color planning in cold region communities, and provide practical reference and theoretical support for subsequent research.
Presenters
HX
Huibo Xu
Harbin, Harbin Institute Of Technology
Co-authors
SW
Songtao Wu
Harbin, Harbin Institute Of Technology
WS
Wanqing Su
Harbin Institute Of Technology
YH
Yuqi Hu
School Of Engineering, Boston University
Unlocking the potential of Water Architecture in urban realm of Delhi, IndiaView Abstract
Research Paper 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/10/29 08:00:00 UTC - 2021/10/29 09:30:00 UTC
The paper aims to analyse the trajectories of urban planning of Delhi from the lens of its historic water architecture since 12th C. AD till the present. The expected outcome of the study is to bring to fore the illegibility of a robust system which shows the city has been historically water- conscious as opposed to water- scarce as of today. The study positions the role of historic water architecture in the city in terms of its spatiality, associations with community and possible way forward to strengthen the ‘local’ with respect to response of the built environment. The capital city of India with expanding population puts pressure on water infrastructure. Delhi is rife with issues like scarcity, inequity, poor water quality and exploitation of ground water, making it one of the cities closer to running out of its ground water by 2020 (NITI Aayog, 2018). Delhi has been an imperial capital during a major part of its history. Historical studies have documented the various cities of Delhi. The historic water architecture of Delhi, wherein every historical layer added and enhanced the existing system. This system is currently not understood as a whole in the built environment. A cultural reading of this water-built network influences the way we understand, analyse and provide solutions for conflicts around water in built environment. The nadis (tributaries of Yamuna) of the historic city of Delhi were strong determinants of the urban growth through the ages. The knowledge and wisdom of finding, tapping, harvesting, conveyance as well as managing water defined the subsequent cities of historic Delhi since 12th century AD. As Wescoat (2019) elucidates, the change of perception of nadi to nallah (drain) from the British period onwards indicates a paradigmatic shift towards urban water, which eventually left out the historic water architecture from conscious urban planning of the city. As the post-Independence planning of Delhi dealt with the dichotomies of order and disorder (Wengoborski & Singh, 2013), the historic water architecture; which constituted meaningful urban spaces as nodes of the nature-built-culture nexus; were not recognized as a part formal urban water system. A case in point is of Hauz Shamsi in Mehrauli, which was the water reservoir of early city Dihli-i-Kuhna (Kumar,2007) which tapped the one of the nadis flowing from the Aravalli ridge. Along its whole network, many typologies of water structures came up, defining the water architecture as well as positioning the cultural water network in the core of the city planning. The study uses archival research, mapping, layering, site studies and community perception to understand this complex settlement of Mehrauli. The emphasis is on turning the focus on water to understand the built environment instead of the other way round. The study endaevours to analyse lost linkages, impact of planning processes in post- Independence India and come up with way forward on integration and innovation of water architecture in Mehrauli. Kumar, S., 2007. The emergence of the Delhi Sultanate, 1192-1286. Permanent Black. NITI Aayog., 2018. Composite Water Management Index: Performance of States. New Delhi: NITI Aayog. Wengoborski, Sonja and Singh, Jaspal 2013. Creating the city of Delhi: stories of strong women and weak walls. In: Petersen, Hans-Christian ed. Spaces of the Poor: Perspectives of Cultural Sciences on Urban Slum Areas and their Inhabitants, Mainz Historical Cultural Sciences, Bielefeld: Transcript, pp. 147-168. Wescoat, James L. 2019. From nallah to nadi, stream to sewer to stream: Urban waterscape research in India and the United States. In: Ray, Sugata & Maddipati, Venugopal ed. Water Histories of South Asia, India: Routledge, pp. 135-157.
Presenters Suruchi Shah
PhD Candidate And Assistant Professor, School Of Art And Architecture, Sushant University, India
Suitability assessment of industrial heritage tourism of the towns along Chinese Eastern Railway in Heilongjiang ProvinceView Abstract
Research Paper 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/10/29 08:00:00 UTC - 2021/10/29 09:30:00 UTC
Tourism utilization of industrial heritage is an important way to balance heritage conservation and economic development. Assessment of the developing-utilization suitability is the basis of making strategy of industrial heritage tourism. As a linear cultural heritage running through Northeast China, Chinese Eastern Railway (CER) inherits the regional historical context. Heilongjiang province, which lies at the intersection of three branches of CER, has abundant industrial heritage resources from 1897 to 1952. However, most of the towns along the railroad are facing the dilemma caused by the homogenization of heritage tourism utilization and the heritage destruction caused by idleness. The purpose of this paper is to assess the suitability of industrial heritage tourism development of CER in Heilongjiang Province and put forward proper tactics to ensure long-term sustainability. Most of the existing studies on heritage tourist destinations are mainly based on single heritage and surrounding built environment evaluation, rarely at the regional level. Therefore, this study takes 24 towns along CER in Heilongjiang Province as research samples. Considering the connection between sustainable tourism and heritage protection, this paper puts forward a theoretical framework of sustainable heritage tourism development. Based on the current situation of natural and social environment, industrial heritage spatio-temporal distribution characteristics of the towns, an evaluation model is established by Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) and Delphi method. Five sub-criteria and twenty sub-sub-criteria are obtained by pre-investigation questionnaire and expert interview. Criterion weights are calculated by expert group decision and Entropy Weight Method (EWM) with qualitative and quantitative analysis. Then, based on multi-source data, 24 towns are divided into four categories by GIS analysis and K-means clustering method. The results show the development suitability of each town and the factors that restrict its sustainable tourism development such as heritage resources, natural environment, social environment, transportation accessibility or tourism service facilities. Among the five sub-criteria, “Heritage resources” contributes the most (35%) to the suitability of industrial heritage tourism development, while “tourism service facilities” contributes the least (11%). Based on the results, this paper proposes strategies at three levels: foster complementarity among towns along CER to achieve joint development; Improve municipal infrastructure and public services & facilities, pass on traditional culture and specialty industries to develop towns with distinct characteristics; Refined transformation of industrial heritage. The evaluation process is going to be used in other parts of CER or other linear cultural heritages.
Presenters
QA
QINGLONG AN
School Of Architecture, Harbin Institute Of Technology;Key Laboratory Of Cold Region Urban And Rural Human Settlement Environment Science And Technology , Ministry Of Industry And Information Technology;
Co-authors
ZZ
ZHIQING ZHAO
School Of Architecture, Harbin Institute Of Technology;Key Laboratory Of Cold Region Urban And Rural Human Settlement Environment Science And Technology , Ministry Of Industry And Information Technology
Patterns, Characteristics and Enlightenment of Urban Underground Complex Practices in ChinaView Abstract
Research Paper 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/10/29 08:00:00 UTC - 2021/10/29 09:30:00 UTC
Urban underground complex (UUC) appears in urban underground space with three-dimensional redevelopment of the city. It is a public transit-oriented underground architecture, integrating with more than two functions such as commerce, entertainment, office and parking, etc. As an important part of urban space, UUC assumes part of the urban functions. Also, Independence, connection, and blurred boundaries are the basic features of UUC. It has advantages in effectively alleviating the problems of land tension, traffic congestion, and environmental pollution in urban center, and can improve the quality of urban space and environment. In China, UUC is mainly characterized by large-scale development and rapid construction. However, the theoretical attention related to the planning and design patterns and characteristics of UUC is far from enough, resulting in extensive construction and failure of meeting the needs of users, which is also a waste of resources. Therefore, this article starts with the current construction background of UUCs in China and the demand of rapid urban development. With in-depth interpretation of the connotation of UUC, this article reviews the development and evolution of UUCs, and the planning and design practices in China in the past four decades. Representative UUCs are chosen as case studies. Their development patterns from the macro planning level are summarized. Their connection with the surrounding urban environment at the meso-level are interpreted. At the micro-level, the characteristics of the spatial form, function distribution, circulation organization, and environment construction of UUCs are analyzed. By summarizing the design patterns and characteristics of UUCs, this article tries to get inspirations and propose corresponding planning and design strategies. The research results can provide references and strategic support for the planning, design and development of UUCs, in order to make the city more livable. References: 1. Gideon S., Ojima T., 1996. Geo-Space Urban Design. John Wiley& Sons, Inc, United States. 2. Linhsu T., 1994. Underground Architecture. Shandong Science& Technology Press, Jinan, China.
Presenters Rusi Zeng
School Of Architecture And Design, Southwest Jiaotong University
Co-authors
ZS
Zhongwei Shen
School Of Architecture And Design, Southwest Jiaotong University. College Of Architecture And Urban Planning Of Chongqing Jiaotong University.
Lighting up Urban Gray Space: Design Practice of an All-Aged Community Space Complex under BridgeView Abstract
Case Study Report 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/10/29 08:00:00 UTC - 2021/10/29 09:30:00 UTC
Cities are facing crowding all around the world and it becomes essential to maximize space utilization, especially in urban areas. With the increasing of bridges, more and more “gray space” under bridge emerges. These “gray space” can often become a hotbed of “broken window effect” in urban environment establishment. The design and utilization of space under bridge should be an important content of efficient utilization of urban space and optimization of urban environmental quality, However, the available designs of space under bridge are mostly simple transformation into parking lots, parks or public toilets which can offer some basic public services, and take few account of uniqueness and space utilization efficiency. Kevin Lynch (1984) studied on the space under bridge and raised his concept of the space utilization in his book, Good City Form. Lynch thought the bridges in urban areas should be designed in a more natural way and utilized the space properly. Nannan Zhao (2020) took the urban area of Wuhan as an example, and proposed strategies and suggestions for the utilization of space under bridge, which will help improve the quality and vitality of the space and create high-quality and efficient service-oriented city. It can be seen that previous studies mainly focused on the functionality of the space under bridge, while seldom considered about how to integrate with the local community. Since bridges are more and more common in urban areas, it may be important to add these “gray space” into contemporary community space, which requires planners pay more attention to the inclusiveness in design. Thus, in our design, we considered more about all-aged requirements in community to turn the “gray space” into an all-aged space complex. This paper presents a planning design of the space under bridge in the community with concepts of stereoscopic, inclusive and livable, and takes full consideration of local community demand to build up a sense of community. Following our research on community age structure, space scale under bridge, bridge structure safety and community facilities around, we divided the space under bridge into 4 parts: a LEGOLAND for children, a plastic track for socializing, a fitness area for exercise and a business district alongside the bridge. Also, we used much modern technology such as smart bookstore, intelligent trail, sensor lights and stereo greening to change the “gray space” into dynamic and habitable community outdoor areas, which helps to avoid the “broken window effect” of the “gray space”, as well as relieve the shortage of public space in urban communities. This planning creates an “all-aged space complex” for community members, and is innovative in urban leftover space exploitation, inclusiveness in all-aged residents and community empowerment, and provides reference for increasing demand of exploitation of the space under bridge in the community. References: 1. Kevin Lynch, Good City Form, The MIT Press, 1984 2. Nannan Zhao, Research on Utilization of Space Under Urban Viaduct Under the Sharing Conception, Urbanism and Architecture,2020
Presenters
JW
Jinbai Wang
Senior Engineer, SHANGHAI TONGJI URBAN PLANNING&DESIGN INSTITUTE
Assistant Professor of Architecture
,
Scientific College of Design & Mansoura University
Student of the Advanced Master in Sustainable Blue Growth (online)
,
University of Trieste
Alumnus
,
School of Planning and Architecture , New Delhi
Shanghai Tongji Urban Planning & Design Institute Co. Ltd.
harbin
,
Harbin Institute of Technology
+ 4 more speakers. View All
 Federico Aili
Project Manager
,
ISOCARP Institute – Centre for Urban Excellence
Mr François Vienne
Associate
,
WSP
Ms Olga Chepelianskaia
Founder and Principal Consultant
,
UNICITI
Dr Nasim Iranmanesh
Architect & PHD in urban planning
,
Islamic azad university of Tehran
Ms Ananya Sethi
Senior Architect
,
Better Habitat Foundation
 Munawar Irfaan S
Urban Design graduate
,
School of Planning and Architecture , New Delhi
 Ulrich Graute
Ulrich Graute - International Affairs Consultancy
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