Track 4: Resilience and adaptability. Al-Waha: promoting glocal solutions Virtual Room 2
Oct 29, 2021 04:00 PM - 06:00 PM(Asia/Qatar)
20211029T1600 20211029T1800 Asia/Qatar Virtual Only | Track 4 | Session 2. Green infrastructure for resilient regions

The session focuses on re-thinking sustainability in cities and assessments of urban resilience. Authors argue contemporary cities today need more regenerative and metabolic approaches to mitigate climate changes. Delivered presentations provide scenarios to enhance resiliency and circular systems. They discuss relationships between urban and rural, multifunctionality of open spaces, ecological functions and landscape protection. 

Sustainable development should serve better resiliency provisions for the local economy and disaster mitigation as an anticipatory response to the risk exposure. As emphasized cities need collaborative and participatory approaches and comprehensive governing system, during the session authors evaluate green urban frameworks and major investment programs. Session aims to introduce a baseline for hazards, vulnerability, risk, and resilience and provides ideas and action guide for the practice of territorial spatial planning to mitigate climate changes. 

Virtual Room 2 57th ISOCARP World Planning Congress in Doha, Qatar congress@isocarp.org

The session focuses on re-thinking sustainability in cities and assessments of urban resilience. Authors argue contemporary cities today need more regenerative and metabolic approaches to mitigate climate changes. Delivered presentations provide scenarios to enhance resiliency and circular systems. They discuss relationships between urban and rural, multifunctionality of open spaces, ecological functions and landscape protection. 

Sustainable development should serve better resiliency provisions for the local economy and disaster mitigation as an anticipatory response to the risk exposure. As emphasized cities need collaborative and participatory approaches and comprehensive governing system, during the session authors evaluate green urban frameworks and major investment programs. Session aims to introduce a baseline for hazards, vulnerability, risk, and resilience and provides ideas and action guide for the practice of territorial spatial planning to mitigate climate changes. 

EX-perience NATO. A regenerative and metabolic approach for re-estabilishing sustainability in cities.View Abstract
Research Paper 03:00 PM - 04:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/10/29 12:00:00 UTC - 2021/10/29 13:30:00 UTC
The ex NATO base in Bagnoli, in the province of Naples, represents an opportunity of transformation for the contemporary city, an opportunity to reflect on the possible relationships between the consolidated historical fabric and the wider urban context. It is named “acropolis” of Bagnoli (ref. A.Attademo, E.Formato, M.Russo) for its privileged position in the area, both from an environmental-landscape and architectural-urban point of view; the ex Nato base had various functions over time. The grand opening of the complex took place on 9 May 1940 with the name “Collegio Costanzo Ciano – Institute for the children of the people” (ref. G.Menna) and he was created with the aim of assisting the most disadvantaged populations, a function that never accepted due to the entry into war the day after the inauguration. In 1941, in fact, the area was handed over to the Italian army, becoming both a place of occupation by the Allies and a refuge for war refugees. From 1953 the complex became the headquarters of the NATO command for the Mediterranean until 2013, the year in which the command itself was dismissed and the area assumes the current name of “Ex NATO base”. The military functions that have taken place have led to creation of physical enclosures, which caused the denial of the area to the people and generated complex relationships with the neighborhood and the urban context. These relations caused the neglect of the area, as well as the abandonment of certain areas of the district. The research carried out during the Laboratory of Urbanism held at the Department of Architecture of the University of Naples Federico II,, in the MAPA Course - ‘Laurea Magistrale in Architettura Progettazione Architettonica’, aimed to re-evaluate the peculiarities of the place in order to implement sustainable, open and inclusive development models. (The course carried out during the academic year 2020-2021 was co-taught by Libera Amenta -Urbanism module - and Vincenzo Gioffrè - Landscape module - with the teaching assistance of Marilù Vaccaro). This has been done through an urban metabolism and a multiscale approach (reif. M.Russo). Thus, the regeneration of the neighborhood and the broader context, started from the definition and mapping of the local wastescapes (ref. REPAiR, 2018). These areas became a design opportunity for socio-environmental reconstructions. In this lens, wastescapes could be read as a structuring reference for the reorganization and reconnection of the urban fabric, which is currently highly fragmented. The laboratory was thus an opportunity to carry out an integrated design experience on an urban scale, investigating new reciprocal relationships between urban and rural, multifunctionality of open spaces, ecological functions and landscape protection, also related to water and waste cycles. Results have been projects capable of offering spaces for the production of lasting wealth and spaces which could be adaptive over time. In this way, the research carried out through the laboratory course seeks to re-estabilish added value to the territory, through a reticular and non-hierarchical model. The contribution of this research therefore offers a reflection on the potential of the regenerative approach in the contemporary city, in particular in areas highly at risk of abandonment and depopulation, thanks to laboratory design experiences.
Presenters
LA
Libera Amenta
Researcher, University Of Naples Federico II
Co-authors
MV
Marilù Vaccaro
Dipartimento Di Architettura, Università Degli Studi Di Napoli Federico II
VG
Vincenzo Gioffrè
Dipartimento Di Architettura, Università Degli Studi Di Napoli Federico II
FG
Francesca Garzilli
Dipartimento Di Architettura, Università Degli Studi Di Napoli Federico II
Study on the Joint Construction of Ecological Control and Green Infrastructure in Desertification Area -- a Case Study of Ulan Buh Desert AreaView Abstract
Research Paper 03:00 PM - 04:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/10/29 12:00:00 UTC - 2021/10/29 13:30:00 UTC
In the process of sustainable development, most of China's resource-based cities, especially those in northeast China, are still unable to get rid of the resource exhaustion dilemma. Resilience is an effective way to deepen urban sustainable development (Meerow, S. 2016; Sharifi, A. 2016), Resilience in terms of cities generally refers to the ability to absorb, adapt and respond to changes in an urban system(Kevin C. 2013). However, there is no commonly applied quantitative approaches for measuring and assessing resilience (W.C. Chuang, 2018), and fewer of them take resource-based cities as research object. Therefore, this paper aims to construct an urban resilience assessment model based on the adaptive cycle framework for resource-based cities in Northeast China, which is beneficial for scientific measurement and classified guidance, through which planners could explore a more specific path of resilience transformation. China's resource-based cities have begun to transform from the initial dual structure of resource consumption to urban sustainable development (Sustainable Development Plan for Resources-Based Cities in China 2013–2020). However, in the process of transformation, some resource-based cities in Northeast China have fallen into a bottleneck period. While the problems left over from history have not been solved, new contradictions have emerged gradually, forming complex problems interwoven with ecology, society, economy and urban infrastructure, such as simple industrial structure, huge economic downward pressure, prominent livelihood issues, population loss, high unemployment, fragile ecological environment, inadequate urban infrastructure, and so on. Although some researchers have used quantitative methods to measure the sustainability of resource-based cities(Lu, C.2016; Xia Wu,2020), less attention has been paid to urban resilience. Resilience has emerged as an attractive perspective with respect to cities, often theorized as highly complex, adaptive systems (Batty, 2008; Godschalk, 2003), and the adaptive cycle is a key heuristic model within resilience theory (Fanghan Luo,2018). This theory believes that a dynamic system would undergo four phases (Allen and Holling, 2010), i.e., exploitation (r), conservation (K), release (Ω) and reorganization (α). Some researchers have used this theory to divide the resilience phases of social-ecological systems (Yi Li 2017; Ling Zhang,2021). In terms of research methods, firstly, statistical data of 19 resource-based cities in Northeast China is collected and analyzed. Secondly, the framework of resilience assessment for resource-based cities is constructed, which includes two indicator systems of urban resilience and risk. In the urban resilience indicator system, according to the current problems and transformation goals of resource-based cities in China, combined with resilience characteristics (such as vulnerability, flexibility, robustness and redundancy), the indicators are screened from four aspects of ecology, society, economy and infrastructure. The principal component analysis (PCA) is used to quantify the indicators. Then, the early warning index of China's resource-based cities (released by the National Research Center for Resource Economics of Peking University) is applied as risk indicator. Finally, after the Min-max standardization, the urban resilience and risk indicators are divided into four resilience phases by cluster analysis according to the adaptive cycle theory. The resilience assessment results of 19 resource-based cities in Northeast China is obtained, and the spatial distribution analysis would also be conducted through Geographic Information System(GIS). Then the resilience phases of these cities could be specifically divided, and provide guidance for urban transformation strategies and deepen the sustainable development of resource-based cities in Northeast China. Provide theoretical reference and related data for the same type of research.
Presenters
ZT
Zhuolin Tan
PhD Student , Harbin Institute Of Technology (HIT)
Co-authors
ML
Ming Lu
Harbin Institute Of Technology
CY
Chao Yuan
School Of Design And Environment, National University Of Singapore
ZJ
Zao Jin
Harbin Institute Of Technology
Blue-Green Critical Infrastructure beyond Contingency Planning and Risk Management: Comprehensive Regional Design Strategies for In-between Territories of the Greater Bay Area.View Abstract
Research Paper 03:00 PM - 04:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/10/29 12:00:00 UTC - 2021/10/29 13:30:00 UTC
Green Critical Infrastructure beyond Contingency Planning and Risk Management: Comprehensive Regional Design Strategies for In-between Territories of the Greater Bay Area. The demand for Green Infrastructure (GI) planning has been increasing in the last 30 years in rapidly transforming China. The reoccurring under-researched question is how to define a GI strategy at the Mega-City Cluster scale comprehensively. New approaches to regional planning that prioritize the well-being of people and the livability of settlements at the local scale are problematized. Formulating future-proof design and planning strategies at the regional scale requires the inclusion of In-between Territories binding together high-density and dispersed cities in metropolitan clusters. This study aims to rethink a Green Infrastructure Design Framework for the Greater Bay Area (GBA) in Guangdong Province, China. The growing GBA in China is a challenging opportunity to envision sustainable environmental, social and economic ecologies at the local, regional and cross-border scale. While often overlooked, the In-between Territories engulfing the main 9+2 cities forming the GBA transactional network are crucial for the integration and longevity of the Great Bay Area vision. Inevitably, the GBA development strategy emphasizes the economic and business integration, improved transport connectivity, technological knowledge transfer, synergistic capital, and environmental preservation of the GBA cities network. The 'Outline Development Plan' (ODP) from 2019 for the Guangdong-Hong Kong-Macao Greater Bay Area pledges to advance Ecological Conservation, to support socially just and Healthy Cities in the region. The proposed alternative design framework seeks to establish and protect In-between Territories as the Critical Green Infrastructure and the backbone resource of a world-class urban agglomeration. The GBA is comparable to the global economic interdependence and impact of the San Francisco Bay Area, Greater Tokyo Bay and the Rhine Delta. An environmental, health, or economic crisis in one interlinked city clusters ultimately leads to global systemic repercussions. Given the planetary interrelatedness, a comprehensive design approach of Critical Green Infrastructure allocation and maintenance at the Mega-City scale is not only a local and regional responsibility. Top-down city – network planning approaches alone are inadequate for advancing the sustainable transformation of local-scale human settlements. The challenges for city planning at a mega-city cluster scale are the better integration of Top-down planning strategies and methods for In-between Territories with emerging Bottom-up communities and livelihood ecologies. Further, to enhance Blue-Green urban infrastructure, the urgent challenges are how to blend smart agricultural practices and digital economies in In-Between Territories. Better relationships between Top-down & Bottom-up and the synthesis of Digital and Natural ecologies may reinforce the Urban-Rural transformation to benefit people at the local scale. Moreover, the need for adaptation and resilience planning goes beyond preparing for an unexpected collapse of a mega-city cluster. Instead, a long-term design approach seeks to develop self-perpetuating people and nature-oriented landscapes, supporting Productive Ecologies and continuously evolving the Sustainable Development of In-between Territories at the local, regional and city-cluster scale. Key words: Greater Bay Area, Top-down & Bottom-up design strategies, Sustainable Ecologies, Critical Green Infrastructure, Resilience, Productive Landscapes.
Presenters
DN
Dan Narita
Architect-Urbanist, Independent Researcher
Governance of green infrastructure. An analysis of urban forests in metropolitan areas in MexicoView Abstract
Research Paper 03:00 PM - 04:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/10/29 12:00:00 UTC - 2021/10/29 13:30:00 UTC
The population in Mexico is concentrated in 15 metropolitan areas with more than one million inhabitants; these agglomerations produce more than 75% of the national GDP. Most greenhouse effect gases (GHG) generated in the country come from these cities, consequently, innovative strategies aimed at managing human activities in them are the best possibility to face climate change. In this context, Green Infrastructure (GI) becomes prominent, providing numerous Ecosystem Services (ES) essential for climate change mitigation and adaptation (1). Innovative policies such as those involving active citizen participation in decision-making processes are highly relevant to the adequate management of GI. Governance of GI –with emphasis on citizen involvement, could turn into beneficial effects to deal with the numerous challenges of metropolitan areas (2). The goal of this article is to identify and characterize the citizen initiatives related to the management of urban forests in the Guadalajara Metropolitan Area (GMA) –one of the three most populous agglomerations in the country–, and to determine the ES provided by these greenspaces. While there are many studies on GI in Mexico, this one will shed light on the processes to address the metropolitan scale from a governance approach (3). Metropolitan governance of planning of the GMA has gone through a transformative process in recent years. The creation of the IMEPLAN (Institute of Planning and Management of Guadalajara Metropolitan Area) has been a milestone. This institution identified and referred to urban forests as key elements to address climate change in the POTmet (GMA Territorial Plan). As a result, IMEPLAN proposed the creation of the AMBU (Metropolitan Agency of Urban Forests) responsible for the management of urban forests, which environmental relevance is also an important asset in the Climate Action Plan of the GMA. This institutional structure was leveraged by citizen initiatives and mobilizations that claimed public attention to these green spaces. To identify these citizen initiatives, secondary sources such as newspaper and scientific articles related to metropolitan Guadalajara were consulted. For characterization purposes, fieldwork, as well as public policy programs and plans, were also reviewed. Mapping and interviewing of stakeholders including public officials, members of grassroots movements, and users of urban forests were conducted, too. To precisely focus the study and interviews on the ES framework, Provisioning, Regulating, Cultural and Support services were considered (4). The paper concludes with recommendations on key innovative factors of citizen initiatives for the management of urban forests which promote inclusion and collaboration with social, public, private, and academic sectors. These recommendations may be considered in future metropolitan planning experiences to improve policy action addressing climate change mitigation and adaptation to ultimately building resilience in metropolitan areas. Keywords: Green infrastructure | Metropolitan governance | Metropolitan planning | Climate change (1) Benedict, M. A., & McMahon, E. T. (2001). Green infrastructure: Smart conservation for the 21st century (Vol. Monograph Series). Washington, D.C.: Sprawl Watch Clearinghouse. (2) Wilker, J., Rusche, K., & Rymsa-Fitschen, C. (2016). Improving Participation in Green Infrastructure Planning. Planning Practice & Research, 229-249. doi:10.1080/02697459.2016.1158065 (3) Gerlak, A. K., Elder, A., Pavao-Zuckerman, M., Zuniga-Teran, A., & Sandeford, A. R. (2021). Agency and governance in green infrastructure policy adoption and change. Journal of Environmental Policy & Planning, 1-17. 2:10.1080/1523908X.2021.1910018. (4) Gómez-Baggethun, E., Gren, A., Barton, D. N., Langemeyer, J., McPhearson, T., O'Farrell, P., . . . Kremer, P. (2013). Urban ecosystem services. In T. Elmqvist, M. Fragkias, J. Goodness, B. Günerlap, P. J. Marcoutillo, R. I. McDonald, . . . C. Wilkinson, Urbanization, biodiversity and ecosystem services: Challenges and opportunities (pp. 175-251). Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands. doi:https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-7088-1_11
Presenters
MH
Miryam Hernández Castellanos
Student, University Of Guadalajara - CUAAD
Co-authors Juan Ángel Demerutis Arenas
Professor, University Of Guadalajara - CUAAD
Urban and Rural Areas in the Future: the mode of Territorial Spatial Planning in ChinaView Abstract
Research Paper 03:00 PM - 04:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/10/29 12:00:00 UTC - 2021/10/29 13:30:00 UTC
In China, urban areas and rural areas are usually regarded as different objects, causing the current classification of planning. Urban planning, overall land use planning and special planning, such as environmental, transportation, socio-economic development planning, are generally applied to differentiated goals and objectives. However, to some extent, obvious boundaries among different plans lead to content conflict, organizational inefficiency, and the low degree of their implementation. Therefore, in order to solve the above dilemmas, China’s government began to explore and build a comprehensive governing system for the development and protection of territorial space around 2015. In 2018, relevant suggestions and programs were made clear. At present, China is gradually establishing norms and modes of spatial planning compilation, approval management, and administrative governance. On the one hand, the research of theory and technology provides ideas and action guide for the practice of territorial spatial planning. On the other hand, the review and summary of practical experiences also further optimize the cognition of planners and decision-makers. All these have promoted interdisciplinary integration. This paper uses two research methods to analyze the current mode of territorial spatial planning in China: 1) quantitative and visual analysis methods are used to carry out knowledge mapping of relevant literature, and systematically review the main research contents, so as to explore the characteristics of the current theoretical development and practical promotion of territorial spatial planning from the academic perspective; 2) we analyze the content of planning outcomes by qualitative research method, especially the overall planning mechanism and development protection points of multiple-level planning practice. In summary, we find that there are several characteristics in the research and practice of China's territorial spatial planning, including 1) the integration of multiple plans has become an important basis for guiding the administrative level to formulate its planning content and specific practice; 2) The degree of coincidence of research cooperation network is not high, which indicates that interdisciplinary integration needs to be strengthened; 3) The research focus is more detailed, but the intensity still needs to be improved; 4) The implementation effect of relevant laws and regulations, technical standards and implementation supervision is insufficient; 5) In planning practice, the research and judgment of basic problems still lack the support of big data and computing technology. Future research is necessary to make continuous efforts in expanding the dimension of advanced case analysis abroad, strengthening the discussion on resilience efficiency of territorial spatial planning, deepening theoretical research and carrying out the practical evaluation, promoting the exploration of industry development and education reform, and enabling the use of big data and artificial intelligence analysis technology. Current stage, the general framework of China's territorial spatial planning system has been established, but the experience of governance and practice is still insufficient, and the relevant laws and regulations at all levels need to be further improved. In summary, from the perspective of academic research and planning practice, this paper attempts to outline the current characteristics and point out the direction of the future. Meanwhile, these rich discussions and summaries will also provide experience and reference for the governance of territorial spatial in other parts of the world.
Presenters
YY
Yidong Yu
Shanghai Tongji Urban Planning & Design Institute Co. Ltd.
Co-authors
DY
Dan Ye
Tongji University
XJ
Xiji Jiang
College Of Architecture And Urban Planning, Tongji University
Aquaculture: the thread of the emerging resiliency of coastal area in IndramayuView Abstract
Research Paper 03:00 PM - 04:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/10/29 12:00:00 UTC - 2021/10/29 13:30:00 UTC
Projected as the future Minapolitan area of West Java by Indonesia’s Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries, Indramayu Regency in Indonesia possesses an abundance of coastal resources such as fisheries, mangroves & aquaculture. Yet among 309 villages in Indramayu, 46 are stated to be underdeveloped in 2019, making Indramayu Regency the lowest five among West Java in its Human Development Index. These underdeveloped villages are mostly housing families whose daily earnings are solely based on agriculture or/and fisheries activities located in the coastal part of Indramayu. The critical urgency of economic resilience supported by these natural resources is highlighted by The Spatial and Regional Planning of Indramayu Regency 2011-2031, stating Indramayu as the Regency Strategic Area in order to anchor further development agenda that will secure the wellbeing of its people. This study investigates possibilities in integrating the use of space and design of everyday infrastructure (specifically aquacultures) through sustainable coastal development to serve better resiliency provisions for the local economy and disaster mitigation as an anticipative response to the abrasion risk exposed to coastal Indramayu. The research will be carried out through qualitative and exploratory study starting with the case study done in Karangsong Village as the foundation that will be followed up by an analytical framework evaluating schemes of urban aquaculture facets explored by Grit Buergow in 2014. The explorative evaluation will revolve around resiliency impacts of the water-living culture, water-farming culture, and water-wellbeing culture as the Water Sensitive Urban Design (WSUD) approach to review the readiness of Karangsong Village to adopt the mentioned coastal development. The results should assist stakeholders in regulating urban planning scenarios that enhance resiliency and the circular system of aquaculture cultivation in those underdeveloped villages along with the involvement of communities, which many of whom struggle to maintain reasonable livelihoods. The formulated urban planning scenario will be generally applicable up to the extent of both statutory planning (Building and Environmental Planning) and non-statutory planning (Masterplan) as long as collaborative and participatory approaches are conducted with the affiliated stakeholders.
Presenters
AS
Assy Saffa Sakinah
Junior Urban Designer, Center Of Urban Design Studies
Co-authors
DB
Dionisius Dino Briananto
Urban Designer, Center Of Urban Design Studies
RS
Riardy Sulaiman
Senior Urban Planner, Pusat Studi Urban Desain, Bandung
Kampung dwellers adaptive responses to climate change hazards and tools to increase their resilienceView Abstract
Research Paper 03:00 PM - 04:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/10/29 12:00:00 UTC - 2021/10/29 13:30:00 UTC
According to CRED-UNISDR report (2020), 80 – 90% of natural disasters within the past ten years are related to climate change, i.e. drought, storm, and flood. Flood, for example, has impacted two billion people within the years 1998 – 2017 worldwide. Kampung dwellers, in which most of them are poor, are one of the vulnerable groups in Indonesia. Poorly built houses and located within disaster-prone areas, such as the riverbanks, are two of many reasons for such vulnerability. Originally, some kampung incrementally developed on riverbanks to be near a water resource. Throughout the year, these kampung is most likely to be flooded when heavy rain falls. Lack of permeable spaces and drainage to handle stormwater treatment in the city caused it to flow through kampung alleys finding ways to rivers since it has lower topography. There are reasons behind the poorly built houses: not only their limited affordability but also lack of land tenure since there is a risk of demolition (Wamsler, 2004). On the other hand, it may not be wise to have the kampung dwellers relocated in order to reduce their vulnerability since such an option may result in collapsing their livelihoods (Blaikie et al, 1994). It is thus important to address adaptation as an alternative solution towards disasters, rather than merely relocation without careful consideration. Adaptation can be considered as mitigation since it reduces the risk of disaster by increasing the ability to respond to hazard. An effective mitigation planning therefore needs vulnerability assessment which includes collecting data on population, property loss, economic and resources limitation to recover from disasters, including society attitudes, preparedness, and awareness of disasters. There are wide varieties of tools available for disaster risk reduction planning but the majority are very specific and highly complex in technicality that it requires an expert to assess hazard as well as a vulnerability within a location. UNDRR Disaster Resilience Scorecard for Cities, for example, is useful and quite easy to understand but limited in terms of how practical it can be utilized by communities to increase their capacity, adaptation, and mitigation to disaster events. It is the intention of this paper to modify the scorecard and bring glocal solution to reduce the vulnerability of kampung. This paper tries to explore the extent of flood hazard, vulnerability, and adaptation made by kampung dwellers in the cities of Solo and Cimahi. Further, it also tries to analyze their resilience. Data collected from observation and interviews are descriptively analyzed and shown as indexes resulted from a modified assessment tool from UNDRR Disaster Resilience Scorecard for Cities. It was found that these two kampung have flood hazard with different intensity and hence destructive characters. The floods are experienced due to topography and lack of drainage capacity. Nonetheless, most kampung dwellers have got accustomed to floods and made different kinds of adaptations to lessen the risk of loss. Elevated floors, simple flood gates, and ceramic tiled walls have become retrofitting methods for the kampung dwellers. Results deriving from the tool have shown that it provides a useful baseline for hazards, vulnerability, risk, and resilience in a particular location. Such baseline needs to be followed by further scenarios such as identification and prioritization of plans and acts to increase resilience, i.e. weighing between relocation and adaptation, choosing between structural and nature-based mitigation, and planning for evacuation routes. In the end, disaster is highly site-specific in terms of how it differs among different climate, topography, socio-economic and spatial characters.
Presenters
FI
Fenita Indrasari
Engineer, Ministry Of Public Works And Housing, Republic Of Indonesia
The Practice of Bridging the Belt and Road Initiative and the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals - The Case of SDG11 Sustainable CitiesView Abstract
Research Paper 03:00 PM - 04:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/10/29 12:00:00 UTC - 2021/10/29 13:30:00 UTC
In 2013, China proposed the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI), a Chinese solution to sustainable development. Based on the original BRI, the emphasis on green and sustainability has become a new trend in recent years because of environmental concerns, especially climate change. In this context, the idea of promoting the BRI to connect the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), integrating regional infrastructure projects with the international sustainable development agenda, and realizing the integration of sustainable development concepts and practices have become the main focus of BRI. As the field to conduct sustainable-related activities and actors for growth, the role of cities has been highlighted in BRI in this process. However, less attention has been paid to this aspect. This paper aims to explore current attempts to achieve sustainable urban development in the background of bridging BRI and SDGs. This paper draws on the theories of urban sustainability to explain the role and main issues of sustainable urban development in the current sustainable development agenda based on the practice of SDG11: Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient, and sustainable. The paper explains the background, implementation status, and development trends of BRI and SDG in this area. This paper argues that related practices of achieving urban sustainability are underway as a solution for developing countries. Since the outbreak of COVID-19, China has introduced more policies and experiments to enhance sustainable urban development, testing to apply successful experience to the transformational development of the BRI.
Presenters
YZ
Yang Zhao
PHD Student, University College London
Mechanism of Cross-border Coordination through Regional Planning for Ecological GoalsView Abstract
Research Paper 03:00 PM - 04:30 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/10/29 12:00:00 UTC - 2021/10/29 13:30:00 UTC
At present, the world is facing the common challenge of "sustainable development". Since 2017, the Chinese government has proposed the goal of "High-quality Development", calling for concerted efforts to balance ecological protection and economic growth, refraining from the sole GDP-oriented developing model. Metropolitan areas, in particular, should change the extensive mode of development while balancing protection and development. The goal of green ecology is taken seriously(Bryan B A, et al., 2018). China is currently undergoing a unprecedented urbanization process across the country,and metropolitan circles have become one of the significant symbols of this urbanization process, in which all kinds of cross-border elements interact frequently , space is developed continuously, and space demand for cross-border development encounters collaboration-conflicts and constrains(BODIN Ö, 2017). In that case, state governance patterns transformation is more than required than ever, especially considering urbanization at such a scale not only generates economic miracles but results in annoying patterns of unsustainable development, the conflict is a typical problem that needs to be solved in the process of regional governance's transformation. How to realize cross-border spatial governance from a regional perspective has become a common focus of many disciplines such as economics, planning and administration(Hongtao Yi, et al.,2017). This research focuses on the regional cross-border conflict, building "structure - process " meta-governance model. The study of spatial planning as a coordination tool is committed to solving the defects and functions of regional public governance in China's rapid urbanization areas, and exploring the planning and coordination mechanism in regional collaborative governance. This article mainly answers the following questions: 1) Practical issues of cross-border regional affairs and the dilemma of collective action in ecological issues; 2) Planning Governance Structure of cross-border regions at all levels ; 3) Planning Policy Process of the cross-border regions, the transmission process and interaction of different stakeholders;4) The coordination mechanism in cross-border regional planning,based on the static Planning Governance Structure model and the dynamic Planning Policy Process model;5) Exploration of spatial planning coordination mechanism and governance approaches applicable to cross-border regions such as urban agglomerations, in the context of ecological goals of global sustainable development. This paper selects two typical polycentric urban agglomerations, the Yangtze River Delta region in China and Randstad in the Netherlands, both of which span four provincial administrative units, as spatial objects. This article focuses on the conflict of water system spatial governance in the transboundary region of the Yangtze River Delta and the controversial conservation and ecological restoration of the "Green Heart" and "Green-Blue Delta" in Randstad(Balz V , Zonneveld W, 2018), based on the theory of meta-governance and collaborative governance in the discipline of public management and urban planning. This paper structurally sorts out the regional planning of the two regions from the 1950s to the present, and conducts textual metrological analysis on more than 100 central and local policies and planning texts. In this study, semi-structured interviews and participatory observation will be carried out in government institutions in the Yangtze River Delta region of China. Land use data will be used to conduct a geospatial econometric analysis of regional spatial change and spatial network, and the efficiency loss and mechanism obstacle of regional spatial planning for realizing regional ecological protection goals in China will be found. In the context of the global regionalization process, this study hopes to provide planning solutions that are conducive to the protection of cross-border blue-green space, and provide governance insights for cross-border regional planning of sustainable development.
Presenters
DS
Dong SU
Tsinghua University
Co-authors
JL
Jian Liu
Associate Dean, Tsinghua University
YZ
Yixin Zhang
Tsinghua University
Green urban frameworks in Russian cities: history, methodology and perspectives. Kazan case study.View Abstract
Case Study Report 03:00 PM - 05:00 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/10/29 12:00:00 UTC - 2021/10/29 14:00:00 UTC
Modern Russia inherited the focus on extensive growth from the USSR, where the emphasis in planning was placed on new industrial capacities. The construction of new urban housing is the main priority in Russia now. Several national projects are currently being implemented in Russia, one of which is “Housing and Urban Environment”. It claims for one billion square meters of housing to be built by 2030. Cities’ General plans are aimed primarily at the development of outskirts and natural suburban territories, which contributes to the rapid urban sprawl. The Green Urban Agenda has been implemented for a long time through the efforts of activists and remained outside the attention of the authorities. It was the result of the volunteers’ and the professional community’s consistent work that brought the issue of urban climate adaptation to a new level. Official climate policy is mainly aimed at working with businesses and controlling carbon emissions; national projects are hardly synchronized with each other in matters of protecting natural resources. There is an explosive interest in the creation of blue-green urban frameworks now. A local green deal begins with the planning of recreation facilities and is based on the active position of citizens opposing the development of natural areas. In Russian cities, unlike most European ones, natural environment is still preserved in the urban fabriс. At the same time, there is no federal law that regulates urban green-blue networks. Such norms can be worked out by each region, but still many of them do without it. Green frame planning issues are practically not disclosed in the requirements for general plan elaboration. Russian cities have a great opportunity to learn the lessons from the experience of their European colleagues without harming themselves. Russian experts working in urban development programs have teamed up with the French Landscape Federation and the Russian Ministry of Construction to create a methodology. Three pilot cities Kazan, Yekaterinburg and Krasnodar are working out mechanisms for the design, implementation, maintenance and administrative regulation of a new urbo-ecological framework approach. For Kazan, a city on the Volga River 1000 kilometers east of Moscow, such a global task has become a logical continuation of already implemented projects for the arrangement of recreational, public and natural areas. The city has implemented administrative interdisciplinary Teams to work on natural areas from the stage of discussing the territory for creation or restoration to design, from implementation to subsequent exploitation, to work with city activists, to search for new forms and methods of joint work. Over the past 10 years, Kazan, interacting with activists and environmentalists, has successfully implemented projects from small lakes improvement to the coastal areas strategies. Numerous Examples: Lake Kharovoe; Gorky Park; Uritsky Park; Oak grove; Lake Kaban; creating a strategy for the Kazanka River floodplain; creating a separate map of the natural complex at the level of the city's general plan with maximum protection of existing zones. Now it is necessary to create such a mechanism for the formation of a continuous urban-ecological framework, the main task of which will be to synchronize all urban projects - from the repair of underground communications to the construction of new social and commercial objects. The main value of which will be the residents’ health . And also to give the highest level of priority to this urban mechanism over the existing city planning documents.
Presenters Alexander Antonov
Expert In Urban Planning
Co-authors
YM
Yana Mertsalova
Traffic Control Center Of Moscow Government
DT
Darya Tolovenkova
Deputy Chief Architect Of The City Of Kazan, Kazan City Architecture And Planning Office
Researcher
,
University of Naples Federico II
PhD student
,
Harbin Institute of Technology (HIT)
Architect-Urbanist
,
Independent Researcher
Student
,
University of Guadalajara - CUAAD
Junior Urban Designer
,
Center of Urban Design Studies
+ 5 more speakers. View All
Mr Pedro Garcia
professeur agrégé
,
Université Laval
 Hanna Obracht-Prondzyńska
Assistant Professor
,
University of Gdańsk
Dr Paolo De Martino
Researcher
,
Tu Delft
Dr Michael Karassowitsch
Professor
,
VIT Vellore School of Planning and Architecture
 Olga Jerjomina
ISOCARP - Technical Administrator
Ph.D Student
,
College of architecture and urban planning, Tongji University
Mrs Barbara Mušič
architect, urban planner, researcher and a project manager of EU projects
,
Urban Planning Institute of the Republic of Slovenia
+2 more attendees. View All
Program Navigator
137 hits