Track 3: Smartness and development. Al-Souq: innovating for performance and management Fayruz 2
Nov 10, 2021 11:30 AM - 01:00 PM(Asia/Qatar)
20211110T1130 20211110T1300 Asia/Qatar Hybrid | Track 3 | Session 5. Development Influences - Part 2: Use of collaboration, toolkits, technology & action plans

Case studies on the regeneration of urban areas, development of smart cities, application of spatial and regional planning policies, and avoiding urban sprawl.

NOTE: Speakers marked in * will participate in this hybrid session as a virtual attendee.

Fayruz 2 57th ISOCARP World Planning Congress in Doha, Qatar ajuurinen@xtalks.com

Case studies on the regeneration of urban areas, development of smart cities, application of spatial and regional planning policies, and avoiding urban sprawl.

NOTE: Speakers marked in * will participate in this hybrid session as a virtual attendee.

Towards a comprehensive roadmap for managing the housing sector in QatarView Abstract
Research Paper 11:30 AM - 01:00 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/10 08:30:00 UTC - 2021/11/10 10:00:00 UTC
Qatar has experienced several decades of substantial growth, largely driven by the exploit of natural resources. The growing economy has in turn fuelled immense development and physical change within Qatar, supporting the growing population of people who are an integral part of the emerging employment sectors. For several years now, Qatar had a clear National Housing Program (NHP), moreover Many laws and systems are on-board supporting and controlling the delivery of the housing options for deferent population groups in a segmented manner. Through the existing system, there are many players and governmental entities responsible for regulating, controlling, providing, and managing the housing sector segmentally. This affected the housing market, as well as causing negative impact on built environment and quality of life. In addition, it is important to have a comprehensive roadmap for housing provision, and integrated communities, which is essential to improve quality of life as a national objective as addressed in Qatar national vision 2030. Based on that, the Ministry of Municipality and Environment issued many policies in Qatar national development framework aimed to progressively improve quality of life for citizens and to achieve the goal of being the region’s most liveable urban environment. Moreover and because of the absence of integration between players in the housing market, MME conducted a National Housing Strategy. The strategy aim is to encourage sustainable development by providing strategic framework for delivering a diverse supply of housing options that respond to the needs of its resident; based on population growth and anticipated future demand. The Strategy provides full picture of the housing sector in Qatar and set out how to counter the existing and anticipated challenges by providing a framework to guide planning, development and integrated delivery by having a comprehensive formalization of the housing sector including all segments & players. Additionally, it will fill the existing gap by identifying a sustainable approach to deliver future housing that is aligned to what is needed, when it is required and where it can be provided. Also, it allows more strategic and integrated planning for service providers to deliver supporting infrastructure, services and amenities consistently with the housing opportunities and plans. Based on the abovementioned, this paper will follow the analytical approach for presenting Qatar’s housing experience by describing & analysing the existing housing program, with reference to challenges. And then, it will demonstrate how the new national strategy will help to achieve the national objectives, especially for the housing sector by implementing its policies, , and how this will be crucial in guiding how the State will face and manage the current challenges, and how it will move forward to contribute to the future well-being of its residents, and how it will contribute in achieving the national economic and environmental visions. Besides, the paper will address the benefit of implementing the strategy and its proposed action plans to provide a range of housing options across Qatar, and how this will help Qatar to assess the housing sector and improve it at the right time, by using the optimum mechanisms to meet the community aspirations. Finally, the paper will conclude by summarizing some lessons learned, and recommendations that can be applied for enhancing the housing profiles in many places.
Presenters
HN
Hebatalla Mohamed Tarek Nooreldeen
Housing Planning And Community Facilities Expert, Ministry Of Municipality & Environment
Co-authors
MH
Maryam Hussain
Head Of General Planning Section, Ministry Of Municipality And Environment
Smart and Sustainable Cities: What we know and what we don't?View Abstract
Research Paper 11:30 AM - 01:00 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/10 08:30:00 UTC - 2021/11/10 10:00:00 UTC
• A brief description of the "problem": While research on Smart Sustainable Cities (SSC) have fueled a rapidly expanding scholarly work in recent years, the key trends and future research avenues are still ambiguous. • Background – our review aims to: (1) identify the most influential contributions, (2) mapping the research on smart sustainable cities, (3) visualizing the trends in this field of research through network analysis, (4) highlighting areas for future research. • Reference to two or more scholarly or official works: • de Jong, M., Joss, S., Schraven, D., Zhan, C., & Weijnen, M. (2015). Sustainable–smart–resilient–low carbon–eco–knowledge cities; making sense of a multitude of concepts promoting sustainable urbanization. Journal of Cleaner Production, 109, 25-38. • Bibri, S. E., & Krogstie, J. (2017). On the social shaping dimensions of smart sustainable cities: A study in science, technology, and society. Sustainable Cities and Society, 29, 219-246. • A brief indication of the methods used: This study examines the content of SSC by applying network and bibliometric analyses. Based on data from 312 articles, we analyze the scholarly work to identify and map SSC as an emerging area of research. • An outline of the principal results, outcomes, findings and lessons: Our analysis suggests that SSC is grounded in five distinct clusters, namely implementation, technology, performance, policy, and value. The results of this study help academics and practitioners to navigate the literature on SSC, provide a map of existing scholarly work, and recommend promising avenues for future research. Further, this review provides a holistic examination on SSC issues and challenges and how they are being addressed by identifying, diagnosing, and tackling these challenges. • Finally, a note about the extent to which the work is (or is not) generally applicable: Our article reviews existing literature on what is known on SSC and how we can advance this area of research.
Presenters
BR
Boumediene Ramdani
Associate Professor Of Management, Qatar University
Co-authors
MA
Mahmoud Abdellatif
Assistant Professor, Qatar University
FB
Fateh Belaid
Professor, Lille Catholic University
Rethinking Smart technologies and Inclusiveness in Cities: the case study of Eskişehir Tepebaşı Municipality in TurkeyView Abstract
Case Study Report 11:30 AM - 01:00 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/10 08:30:00 UTC - 2021/11/10 10:00:00 UTC
Planning a smart city is an ambition that requires more than just a vision to change. Strategizing and developing action plans are the first building blocks for such a transformation. Nevertheless, ensuring effective outcomes and sustainability of the transformation calls for adopting an approach that employs smart diagnosis to support decision making. In addition, promoting social and environmental justice as part of the transformation process cannot be achieved without mainstreaming gender sensitivity via effective public participation instruments. According to Ekman (2018), there is a tendency in the milieu of smart cities for the reduction of complexity by placing primacy in planning on information technology, economic profit and top-down political government. He argues that an obvious example of this reduction is the ‘split between the comprehensive, strategically top-down national program for more than a dozen U-cities in South Korea (...) and the main concerns in the most recent anothology as citizen’s right to the digital city (Foth et. Al 2016), which signals the need to emphasize participatory inclusive governance’. Therefore, Ekman (2018) suggests that smart city planning cannot assume a blueprint as a ground for city (trans)formation. Meanwhile, Greco and Crest (2015) call for shifting the focus of the discussion from “how cities can be smarter” to “how intelligent technologies can lead us to rethink the patterns of urban development by making them fair and inclusive, as well as efficient and sustainable”. To this end, this case study report analyses how Tepebaşı Municipality, located in the city of Eskişehir, has demonstrated with its smart urban regeneration project that spanned the period of 66 months how to couple technological advancements with good urban governance to achieve smartness as well as social and environmental justice i.e. a dual approach that involves gender mainstreaming by increasing citizen’s participation in decision making. The case study report adopts an explanatory deductive approach to verify the hypothesis about the positive impacts of smart city planning in overcoming challenges to sustainable development. The explanatory approach is also essential to understanding how the design interventions contribute to achieving social and environmental justice. The adopted integrated approach that is complemented by ICT and smart strategies has catapulted Tepebaşı municipality to the forefront as a model for sustainable smart city. It is the first municipality in Turkey to meet its specific targets for the 17 SDGs of the 2030 agenda. It is also the first municipality in Turkey to deliver its sustainable energy action plan (SEAP) interim report that demonstrated the level of excellency in seven areas. ICT and smart strategies were deployed in several action fields, which are low energy districts, sustainable mobility and integrated infrastructure, and society. The establishment of the ‘Life village’ was a fruit of articulate integration of the citizens’ needs in the planning of the city. The ‘Life Village’ hosts 12 buildings that provide different social services including Alzheimer Care Centers, Disabled Assembly Atelier for mentally-disabled citizens, Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation Center, Nursing Homes for visually impaired citizens, Art Residence, Primary School, Day Care Center, Health Care Center, Nursing Homes for healthy senior citizens, and Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Association Center. The entire village is served with smart grid connectivity, district energy-efficient retrofitting, and distributed renewable energy generation. This model for transformation is replicable since it emphasizes monitoring and evaluating the gradual transformation the city undergoes thus drawing empirical evidence required in future replication processes. To replicate the smart city solutions implemented in Tepebaşı, the Lighthouse projects cooperation manifesto was signed in 2017 which utilises this urban regeneration model that is based on the joint transformation of the districts, urban mobility and infrastructure.
Presenters
MS
Muna Shalan
Advisor, GIZ
MA
Murat Aksu
Director Of European Coordination Center, Eskişehir Tepebaşı Municipality
ADVANCED COGENERATION OPTIONS FOR REINTEGRATING LOCAL ASSETS (AGORA) INTERREG PROJECTView Abstract
Case Study Report 11:30 AM - 01:00 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/10 08:30:00 UTC - 2021/11/10 10:00:00 UTC
The transitional phase in which the Danube Region (DR) cities found themselves after the 2008 economic crisis allowed a window of opportunity to enact positive change on the planning policy level. There have been numerous initiatives in the past aimed to reuse, even temporarily, un-valued physical assets for launching novel forms of economies by a new generation of highly skilled young teams. Yet such initiatives remained disparate or difficult to replicate taking into consideration the large contextual variability surrounding urban settlement development (for instance, wealth, population density, historical development, etc.) and the fact that there is no centralizing tool directly addressing this issue. The biggest challenge remains that of embedding the necessary instruments into governance, creating local capacity and instruments for fast-tracking urban regeneration. Cities need to overcome a spectrum of bottlenecks, which include legal, administrative and organizational, financial, technical, logistical, and expertise related barriers and gaps. AGORA Interreg Project addresses this by deploying and adopting new, creative governance instruments for Public Administrations, in 10 different cities in the Danube Region, thus building their capacity for effectively involving, connecting, and empowering a wide group of stakeholders in the reintegration of vacant buildings and land, public and private, into the productive city value system. Those cities are: ( Regionalverbrand Neckar-Alb -Metzingen, MeBstetten, Rottenburg-, Prague 9, Szarvas, Chisinau, Cluj-Napoca, Sofia, Zenica, Slavonski Brod, Koprivnica, Kranj. We want to achieve substantial change in the process and workflow of PAs at the local level, as well as to launch a transnational policy-learning platform for supporting Danube Region cities in the reintegration and reconnection of local undervalued assets, giving a new sense to abandoned spaces, brownfields, urban areas in decline. The regeneration process will be focused in each city around one of the following thematic clusters: UNUSED/ UNDERUSED AREAS as public spaces’ potential (Valuation of unused public spaces, open and built, as social, educational and/or cultural service hubs; etc.), LARGE-SCALE (post-) INDUSTRIAL AREAS (Recovery and economic valorization of large-scale post-industrial heritage in private or public property), UNUSED/ UNDERUSED AREAS (buildings) (Matchmaking between vacant commercial / business spaces in the city and potential users;). The paper will focus on the outputs of WorkpackageT3, part of the AGORA project. The main outcomes that WPT3 wants to achieve refer to the activation all of the local AGORA Communities and CPs set-up in previous Work packages, and involve them in the co-creation process of conceptual development visions for their city. It will be carried out in parallel in all participating cities and will result in defining the process, tools and roadmap employed for the Co-Design of context specific Regeneration Agendas. A critical analysis and comparison of best cases, examples from cities in Danube region, but also Western examples from Europe is done and gathered in a Co-creation Digital Library. WP T3 activates the local networks and engages them in consolidating their city-building visions upon the knowledge gathered from the Digital Library. Cities produce strategic roadmaps through the adaptation of solutions from the policy instrument to design public services, protocols, methodologies, and instruments supporting the redevelopment of un/underused vacant spaces (post-industrial, public open spaces, and public/private built heritage).
Presenters Serin Geambazu
Associate Professor, Ion Mincu University Of Architecture And Urban Planning
Co-authors Barbara Mušič
Architect, Urban Planner, Researcher And A Project Manager Of EU Projects, Urban Planning Institute Of The Republic Of Slovenia
Andrada-Ioana Lupulescu
Urban Planner, URBASOFIA, Www.urbasofia.eu
Oana Emilia Budau
Urban Planner, Project Manager Of EU Projects, URBASOFIA, Www.urbasofia.eu
Urban sprawl as a regional planning issue on the example of Nizhny NovgorodView Abstract
Research Paper 11:30 AM - 01:00 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/10 08:30:00 UTC - 2021/11/10 10:00:00 UTC
After the collapse of the USSR in 1991, spatial planning at the regional level instantly turned from a specific area of ​​practice-oriented knowledge into an anachronism, unsuitable in the new economic conditions. The initial socio-psychological orientation to the implementation of reforms to weaken government interference in the economy gained popularity, as a result of which the previously existing rules and regional plans developed according to them turned out to be unsuitable. The rethinking of their role in the new conditions was hampered by practical, scientific and educational traditions that developed in the USSR, isolated from global examples and based on their own vision of the goals and objectives of regional spatial planning. The return to regional planning is currently taking place in response to emerging challenges, interpreted within the framework of the scientific schools that have developed in the Soviet Union, first of all, “geographical” and “regional economic”. One of these challenges, widespread in the urban regions of Russia in recent years, has become the observed examples of uncontrolled urban growth due to the development of agricultural, forest and natural lands on their outskirts. The "geographic" school in the Soviet regional planning (‘rayonnaya planirovka’) proceeds from the solution of the problems of the optimal location of production centers, and therefore traditionally presents the territory of the city as an agglomeration. The “regional economic” school is focused on the tasks of ensuring the economic development of the region, which also presupposes an undeniably positive assessment of the impact of the agglomeration effect on the spatial development of the city. In this regard, in Russia in the current conditions, spatial planning on a scale larger than the city is considered exclusively from the standpoint of strategic planning of the socio-economic development of the agglomeration. Such optics of analysis, assessment and planning of urban growth does not take into account the criteria of sustainability and resilience of the urban form, the influence of the spatial organization and transport system of the city on climate change, and ensuring the preservation of natural landscapes and biodiversity. It also does not take into account the possible decline in the population as an objective circumstance for many Russian cities. In order to overcome the identified limitations, taking into account the urgency of the problem of urban sprawl in Russia, we have proposed a set of systemic changes to expand the content and clarify the procedure for implementing regional plans. The proposed changes are considered on the example of the urban region of Nizhny Novgorod, which has signs of the most intensive sprawl among the million-plus cities in Russia. The key proposal is to strengthen the logical link between the regional plan and the planned land use in the periphery of a large city, which found expression in our experimental regional plan. To study the possible consequences of the proposed reform of regional planning, interviews with experts were conducted, from which conclusions were drawn about the advisability of strengthening regional planning to counter urban sprawl in Russia.
Presenters Dmitry Boyko
Director, GeoClever LLC
Infrastructure Accessibility Tool: a move towards policy-as-a-serviceView Abstract
Case Study Report 11:30 AM - 01:00 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/10 08:30:00 UTC - 2021/11/10 10:00:00 UTC
With the development of geospatial technologies and the availability of machine-readable data, local governments constantly increase the share of IT in their total spendings. In the UK only, local governments spend over £1 billion on sourcing and supporting software annually. While digitalisation of governance has been the trend for over 20 years the approach that cities take to that transformation vary significantly. In our presentation, we will focus on technologies in urban spatial planning and land management, in particular, on how GIS-enabled calculations of infrastructure accessibility are used in various governance environments. Core examples analysed include People Near Transit (PNT) used by OECD, and the Public Transport Accessibility Level tool (PTAL) in London; and more comprehensive models that calculate time-travel to multiple travel destinations, such as the Land Use and Public Transport Accessibility Indexing Model in Greater Sydney, the City of Johannesburg’s nodal planning tools, and SaavutettavuusTarkastelut in Helsinki. Finally, the ongoing work on building similar tools for the city of Izhevsk and Johannesburg will be critically reviewed. The results of the analysis demonstrate a split in how these tools are used in policy implementation. It suggests that the different approach to these tools will lead to two models of policy implementation: one leaning towards law-enforcement and the other leaning towards policy-as-a-service, incentivising compliance and thus reducing public spending. Outcomes of the analysis could be valuable for local government authorities, in particular to spatial policymakers, transport planners and software procurement specialists. It could be further used to run a more comprehensive cost-benefit analysis of the different types of software systems that include not only software running costs but law enforcement and compliance. Last but not least, the private sector could use the outcomes to adjust its product strategies and sales.
Presenters
MB
Maria Bobrinskaya
Head Of GIS, NOVAYA
Co-authors
YM
Yuriy Milevskiy
Co-Founder And Managing Director , NOVAYA
Revitalizing the Sidewalks of España Boulevard through a Street Management Plan vis-à-vis Community EmpowermentView Abstract
Research Paper 11:30 AM - 01:00 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/10 08:30:00 UTC - 2021/11/10 10:00:00 UTC
Roads are very critical in the progress of any city or community. Similar to the human body, streets are arteries that ensure the efficient flow and function of the various systems. These allow people and goods to be transported from one place to the next. Aside from access to basic services, utility lines like power and water may run along these engineering infrastructures. The City of Manila – one of the oldest cities, the political capital of the Philippines, and home to numerous educational institutions – has made attempts to address these concerns. Existing land use is mostly residential and mixed-use, wherein lower spaces have been converted into commercial spaces while the upper floors are for private or bedroom areas. High-rise residential developments have sprouted along its major thoroughfares. (MANILA-CLUPZO, 2010) The scope of the study will be along the stretch of España Boulevard, a 2-kilometer secondary road that links Quezon City and Manila. To address the problem, the study will review (1) the present conditions of the pedestrian experience within the site, (2) past and present projects of the national and local government, and (3) pedestrian and vehicular access within the site. This will include the 2005-2020 Manila Comprehensive Land Use Plan and Zoning Ordinance (MCLUPZO) and other on-going developments. Preliminary findings were heavy vehicular traffic, obstructed streets, and flooding are common urban problems, which include España Boulevard. Environmentalists and experts have reasserted that rapid urbanization and climate change has contributed to the worsening situation in cities like Manila. Government mitigations usually include the rehabilitation of roads and dredging of drainages. Still, continuous rising floodwater threatens the safety of stranded residents and students within the area. Adapting the Community Development Framework (Greater Shepparton City, Australia), the study reconciled archival and online data with collective inputs and feedback from public officials and stakeholders. Tactics included focused group discussions with project implementers and representatives from the academe, online questionnaires, and site documentation. Through community engagement, stakeholders of España Boulevard validated these concerns while also realizing the positive features and opportunities of the area for pedestrianization, sustainability, and heritage. The consultation workshop with residents, community and local officials led to the collective vision of: “España Boulevard: to be safe, flood-free, a well-maintained major road, with disciplined pedestrians and drivers, unobstructed sidewalks, green landscaping, efficient utilities, and police visibility.” The study resulted in conceptual designs of the sidewalks of España Boulevard, which were presented to stakeholders. The present pandemic situation was also considered as walking and alternative transportation has helped decongestion said boulevard. The potential of linking tourism and education along the sidewalks were likewise considered through cultural mapping of the study area. Local and community officials were also reminded to consider the following: 1) Effective Governance: Strict implementation of ordinance on unobstructed sidewalks, illegal vending and parking; 2) Public Presence: Unified efforts of police and barangay officials in maintaining the cleanliness, safety and security of streets; and 3) Private participation: Incentives to business and home owners in the maintenance and upkeep of their properties. Learnings of the study are applicable to cities, who have limited space for expansion.
Presenters Felicisimo Jr Tejuco
Faculty Member, University Of Santo Tomas
Pritzker is not enough: Braga Stadium and the city-branding that was notView Abstract
Research Paper 11:30 AM - 01:00 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/10 08:30:00 UTC - 2021/11/10 10:00:00 UTC
It is well known that sports mega-events are widely used as city, even country branding tools: this is the case of UEFA EURO 2004, when Portugal – one of smaller economies of UE – built ten stadiums to receive the most important football championship in Europe. Some Portuguese cities saw the opportunity to promote expansion of urban areas or host international entertainment events; some football clubs saw it as way to update or build new stadiums, with the prospect of use them not as simple sport venue, but as multi-purpose arenas and touristic attraction, as some of its Spanish and English counterparts did: all that appetite was fueled by less demanding financial controls of late 1990’s. With that background, Sporting Club Braga, hometown glory of the homonymous city asked Eduardo Souto de Moura, then an internationally renowned architect, to design a stadium able to host final stage matches of UEFA EURO 2004, adhering strictly to federation higher standards. Souto de Moura lead a team that delivered what is praised as one of his masterworks – and one of the world’s most relevant buildings in the turn of the century, which paved the way to his author win the Pritzker Prize in 2011, maximum honor in the field of Architecture. Despite all that, shortly after the championship, the stadium started to be heavily criticized by SC Braga, its tenant and the City of Braga, its owner: do not bring as much fans as expected; it is not exactly an “indoor facility” but an open landscape feature, which made it sometimes uncomfortable to watch games in cooler periods; do not promote urbanization around it, becoming an isolated structure; and, above anything else, it was the most expensive of UEFA EURO 2004, with the start of lending payments in a strong recession period in Europe. Since then, Braga Stadium is a contentious subject: seventeen years later, city and club has tried to sell the stadium; has proposed to retrofit a smaller, older stadium in downtown to become its home, “leaving” behind the current one and, as final resort, to demolish the existing building to create space for new ventures. This paper explores the intricacies of such process: how a little developed legacy design process, according to Preuss (2008), lead to complete rejection not just of the building, but to all supposed effort to insert Braga in a global network of sports/architecture destination. It also explores the current state, where the club and city intend to build a new stadium answering the same UEFA requirements that Souto de Moura already did in 2004. The study intends to reinforce the importance of planning education for citizens, investors, and officials by detailing a case where little attention was given to long term results and implications of extraordinary investments, as is the case of sports megaevents. It also highlights the importance of collaboration and openness in planning processes that should involve large part of community as stakeholder. The study is part of author’s PhD thesis currently in development and was realized with basis on stakeholder’s interviews, academic and press files research.
Presenters Guilherme Maia
PhD Candidate, Universidade De Coimbra
Collaboration in planning nature-based solutions: Replication tools towards place-based ecologic urban regenerationView Abstract
Case Study Report 11:30 AM - 01:00 PM (Asia/Qatar) 2021/11/10 08:30:00 UTC - 2021/11/10 10:00:00 UTC
The report is presenting part of the results and ongoing work of the EU Horizon2020 project proGIreg (productive Green Infrastructure for post-industrial urban regeneration: Nature for Renewal). ProGIreg project aims to demonstrate the integration of nature-based solutions (NBS) into business models that are economically self-sustaining and provide multiple benefits for the economic, ecological and social regeneration of deprived urban areas suffering from the consequences of de-industrialisation. More specifically, the case-study report will focus on the use of methodological tools for the replication process of the proGIreg initiative from Front Runner Cities (FRC) (Dortmund, Turin, Zagreb, Ningbo) to Follower Cities (FC) (Cascais, Cluj-Napoca, Piraeus, Zenica). The tools have been created starting from the outcomes of experiences and lessons learnt from the FRC implementation process. The Replication Toolkit and the Roadmap, the two replication tools, are being tested for the first time by FC, being potentially replicable by other worldwide cities that struggle with post-industrial areas regeneration. The tools were created to ease the development of Regeneration Urban plans, a transformation strategy focused on generating structural environmental and socio-economic changes through NBS. The Replication Toolkit captures insights, reflections and lessons learnt from the experience of FRC, presented in the forms of recommendations on two levels:(a) Strategic Level - helping in the decision-making process; (b) Operational level - collecting good practices for the transformation of the area and replicable NBS-specific information. The Roadmap is a step by step process (that leverages on the Replication Toolkit), showing potential replicators how to build a coherent strategy towards the integration of NBS in the local context. It is constructed in three distinct stages: (a)Preparatory work;(b) Planning the Urban Regeneration Area Transformation;(c) From co-design to co-implementation. Each stage is divided into blocks, collecting specific steps that help acquire the information to be further used for the elaboration of the tailor-made strategies. The two tools work together, accompanying cities in their journey toward NBS integration and sustainable transformation. The key aspect of this specific replication methodology is that the process is designed as a community-oriented approach, COLLABORATION being the central aspect of delivering meaningful and effective urban regeneration/transformation solutions. The process of urban regeneration through NBS promoted by proGIreg strongly relies on the participatory and co-creation and co-implementation approach, considering the benefits for both the community and the successful implementation of the project. NBS and Regeneration Plans are co-created in multi-stakeholder partnerships, following the quadruple-helix approach: academia (universities and research institutions), governmental institutions (local governments and other public authorities), the private sector and civil society (NGOs and individual citizens). The tools follow four fundamental approaches: (1) Retrospective approach - a critical look at past initiatives, building a coherent set of recommendations to solve concrete problems identified; (2) Iterative approach - the possibility of having multiple throwbacks, iterations, and changes during the path to find a good match between the local needs and the proposed solutions; (3) Incremental approach - a step by step approach that is ensuring a comprehensive and efficient assessment of problems, necessities, solutions towards the creation of the final design; (4) Adaptation - the roadmap and the toolkit have been constructed to be adaptable to each specific context and to allow setting-up tailor-made paths towards Regeneration Urban Plans. The report aims at describing how FC are approaching the constructed replication methodology and how they are being supported throughout the overall process, in order to build a coherent, local-based strategy for the replication and integration of the NBS within the local urban planning context.
Presenters Codruț-Lucian Papina
Urban Planner, URBASOFIA
Oana Emilia Budau
Urban Planner, Project Manager Of EU Projects, URBASOFIA, Www.urbasofia.eu
Co-authors
MO
Margot Olbertz
Research Associate, RWTH Aachen University
Urban Planner, Project Manager of EU projects
,
URBASOFIA, www.urbasofia.eu
Associate Professor of Management
,
Qatar University
Advisor
,
GIZ
Director of European Coordination Center
,
Eskişehir Tepebaşı Municipality
director
,
GeoClever LLC
+ 6 more speakers. View All
 Mario Corbi
ISOCARP - Technical Administrator
 Alexander Antonov
expert in Urban planning
Mr Junji Shibata
Corporate Officer
,
Oriental Consultants Global
Dr Nasim Iranmanesh
Architect & PHD in urban planning
,
Islamic azad university of Tehran
ADMINISTRATION RESEARCHER
,
MOCI
+14 more attendees. View All
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